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Muscle co-activity tuning in Parkinsonian hand movement: disease-specific changes at behavioral and cerebral level.

van der Stouwe AM, Toxopeus CM, de Jong BM, Yavuz P, Valsan G, Conway BA, Leenders KL, Maurits NM - Front Hum Neurosci (2015)

Bottom Line: In healthy subjects, composite movements recruited the striatum and cortical areas comprising bilaterally the supplementary motor area and premotor cortex, contralateral medial prefrontal cortex, primary motor cortex, primary visual cortex, and ipsilateral superior parietal cortex.Compared to healthy subjects, PD patients showed decreased activation of the striatum and cortical areas in composite movement, while performing worse at behavioral level.As singular movement performance was only slightly compromised, we interpret this as a reflection of increased visuospatial processing, possibly as a compensational mechanism.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen Groningen, Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
We investigated simple directional hand movements based on different degrees of muscle co-activity, at behavioral and cerebral level in healthy subjects and Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. We compared "singular" movements, dominated by the activity of one agonist muscle, to "composite" movements, requiring conjoint activity of multiple muscles, in a center-out (right hand) step-tracking task. Behavioral parameters were obtained by EMG and kinematic recordings. fMRI was used to investigate differences in underlying brain activations between PD patients (N = 12) and healthy (age-matched) subjects (N = 18). In healthy subjects, composite movements recruited the striatum and cortical areas comprising bilaterally the supplementary motor area and premotor cortex, contralateral medial prefrontal cortex, primary motor cortex, primary visual cortex, and ipsilateral superior parietal cortex. Contrarily, the ipsilateral cerebellum was more involved in singular movements. This striking dichotomy between striatal and cortical recruitment vs. cerebellar involvement was considered to reflect the complementary roles of these areas in motor control, in which the basal ganglia are involved in movement selection and the cerebellum in movement optimization. Compared to healthy subjects, PD patients showed decreased activation of the striatum and cortical areas in composite movement, while performing worse at behavioral level. This implies that PD patients are especially impaired on tasks requiring highly tuned muscle co-activity. Singular movement, on the other hand, was characterized by a combination of increased activation of the ipsilateral parietal cortex and left cerebellum. As singular movement performance was only slightly compromised, we interpret this as a reflection of increased visuospatial processing, possibly as a compensational mechanism.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

fMRI results: differences between healthy subjects and Parkinson patients. Increased activations (SPM T-maps) for the two comparisons between composite and singular step-track movements. Green activations: PD < HC, purple activations: PD > HC. Basal ganglia: 1, left striatal cluster; 2, thalamic/pulvinar cluster. Cerebellum: 1, anterior cerebellum; 2, posterior cerebellum; Cortex: 1, medial prefrontal (BA9); 2, supplementary motor area (BA6); 3, (dorsal) premotor cortex; 4, primary motor cortex (BA4); 5, primary sensory cortex (BA2); 6, superior parietal cortex (BA7). Differences in activations between groups were investigated by using exclusive masks (at threshold level p = 0.05). For visualization purposes, all activations are shown above a threshold level of p = 0.01 (uncorrected), without a restriction of cluster size (k). The z-coordinates indicate the position of the shown transversal planes relative to the AC–PC plane. Activations were rendered on the standard anatomical (ch2) template of MRICron (Rorden et al., 2007). L, Left hemisphere.
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Figure 5: fMRI results: differences between healthy subjects and Parkinson patients. Increased activations (SPM T-maps) for the two comparisons between composite and singular step-track movements. Green activations: PD < HC, purple activations: PD > HC. Basal ganglia: 1, left striatal cluster; 2, thalamic/pulvinar cluster. Cerebellum: 1, anterior cerebellum; 2, posterior cerebellum; Cortex: 1, medial prefrontal (BA9); 2, supplementary motor area (BA6); 3, (dorsal) premotor cortex; 4, primary motor cortex (BA4); 5, primary sensory cortex (BA2); 6, superior parietal cortex (BA7). Differences in activations between groups were investigated by using exclusive masks (at threshold level p = 0.05). For visualization purposes, all activations are shown above a threshold level of p = 0.01 (uncorrected), without a restriction of cluster size (k). The z-coordinates indicate the position of the shown transversal planes relative to the AC–PC plane. Activations were rendered on the standard anatomical (ch2) template of MRICron (Rorden et al., 2007). L, Left hemisphere.

Mentions: Comparing the patterns of brain activations between groups using exclusive masking, revealed that for composite movements (Composite > Singular) patients showed decreased activations in the left ventral striatum (Figure 5 and Table 4). In patients compared to healthy subjects, decreased cortical activation was also found in the SMA and bilateral (pre-) motor areas, the contralateral medial prefrontal and ipsilateral superior parietal cortex, while increased activation was seen mid temporally. For the comparison Singular > Composite, patients had decreased activation in the contralateral ventro-lateral thalamus. They showed increased activations in a cluster of the right pulvinar, extending to the bilateral anterior thalamus and dorsal caudate. The comparison Singular > Composite showed increased activations in patients distributed over the ipsilateral dorsal PMC, superior parietal and contralateral posterior cerebellum (lobule VI).


Muscle co-activity tuning in Parkinsonian hand movement: disease-specific changes at behavioral and cerebral level.

van der Stouwe AM, Toxopeus CM, de Jong BM, Yavuz P, Valsan G, Conway BA, Leenders KL, Maurits NM - Front Hum Neurosci (2015)

fMRI results: differences between healthy subjects and Parkinson patients. Increased activations (SPM T-maps) for the two comparisons between composite and singular step-track movements. Green activations: PD < HC, purple activations: PD > HC. Basal ganglia: 1, left striatal cluster; 2, thalamic/pulvinar cluster. Cerebellum: 1, anterior cerebellum; 2, posterior cerebellum; Cortex: 1, medial prefrontal (BA9); 2, supplementary motor area (BA6); 3, (dorsal) premotor cortex; 4, primary motor cortex (BA4); 5, primary sensory cortex (BA2); 6, superior parietal cortex (BA7). Differences in activations between groups were investigated by using exclusive masks (at threshold level p = 0.05). For visualization purposes, all activations are shown above a threshold level of p = 0.01 (uncorrected), without a restriction of cluster size (k). The z-coordinates indicate the position of the shown transversal planes relative to the AC–PC plane. Activations were rendered on the standard anatomical (ch2) template of MRICron (Rorden et al., 2007). L, Left hemisphere.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Show All Figures
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Figure 5: fMRI results: differences between healthy subjects and Parkinson patients. Increased activations (SPM T-maps) for the two comparisons between composite and singular step-track movements. Green activations: PD < HC, purple activations: PD > HC. Basal ganglia: 1, left striatal cluster; 2, thalamic/pulvinar cluster. Cerebellum: 1, anterior cerebellum; 2, posterior cerebellum; Cortex: 1, medial prefrontal (BA9); 2, supplementary motor area (BA6); 3, (dorsal) premotor cortex; 4, primary motor cortex (BA4); 5, primary sensory cortex (BA2); 6, superior parietal cortex (BA7). Differences in activations between groups were investigated by using exclusive masks (at threshold level p = 0.05). For visualization purposes, all activations are shown above a threshold level of p = 0.01 (uncorrected), without a restriction of cluster size (k). The z-coordinates indicate the position of the shown transversal planes relative to the AC–PC plane. Activations were rendered on the standard anatomical (ch2) template of MRICron (Rorden et al., 2007). L, Left hemisphere.
Mentions: Comparing the patterns of brain activations between groups using exclusive masking, revealed that for composite movements (Composite > Singular) patients showed decreased activations in the left ventral striatum (Figure 5 and Table 4). In patients compared to healthy subjects, decreased cortical activation was also found in the SMA and bilateral (pre-) motor areas, the contralateral medial prefrontal and ipsilateral superior parietal cortex, while increased activation was seen mid temporally. For the comparison Singular > Composite, patients had decreased activation in the contralateral ventro-lateral thalamus. They showed increased activations in a cluster of the right pulvinar, extending to the bilateral anterior thalamus and dorsal caudate. The comparison Singular > Composite showed increased activations in patients distributed over the ipsilateral dorsal PMC, superior parietal and contralateral posterior cerebellum (lobule VI).

Bottom Line: In healthy subjects, composite movements recruited the striatum and cortical areas comprising bilaterally the supplementary motor area and premotor cortex, contralateral medial prefrontal cortex, primary motor cortex, primary visual cortex, and ipsilateral superior parietal cortex.Compared to healthy subjects, PD patients showed decreased activation of the striatum and cortical areas in composite movement, while performing worse at behavioral level.As singular movement performance was only slightly compromised, we interpret this as a reflection of increased visuospatial processing, possibly as a compensational mechanism.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen Groningen, Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
We investigated simple directional hand movements based on different degrees of muscle co-activity, at behavioral and cerebral level in healthy subjects and Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. We compared "singular" movements, dominated by the activity of one agonist muscle, to "composite" movements, requiring conjoint activity of multiple muscles, in a center-out (right hand) step-tracking task. Behavioral parameters were obtained by EMG and kinematic recordings. fMRI was used to investigate differences in underlying brain activations between PD patients (N = 12) and healthy (age-matched) subjects (N = 18). In healthy subjects, composite movements recruited the striatum and cortical areas comprising bilaterally the supplementary motor area and premotor cortex, contralateral medial prefrontal cortex, primary motor cortex, primary visual cortex, and ipsilateral superior parietal cortex. Contrarily, the ipsilateral cerebellum was more involved in singular movements. This striking dichotomy between striatal and cortical recruitment vs. cerebellar involvement was considered to reflect the complementary roles of these areas in motor control, in which the basal ganglia are involved in movement selection and the cerebellum in movement optimization. Compared to healthy subjects, PD patients showed decreased activation of the striatum and cortical areas in composite movement, while performing worse at behavioral level. This implies that PD patients are especially impaired on tasks requiring highly tuned muscle co-activity. Singular movement, on the other hand, was characterized by a combination of increased activation of the ipsilateral parietal cortex and left cerebellum. As singular movement performance was only slightly compromised, we interpret this as a reflection of increased visuospatial processing, possibly as a compensational mechanism.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus