Limits...
Dentoskeletal features in individuals with ectopic eruption of the permanent maxillary first molar.

Mucedero M, Rozzi M, Cardoni G, Ricchiuti MR, Cozza P - Korean J Orthod (2015)

Bottom Line: The first 265 subjects were included as controls, while the remaining 1,052 subjects included the sample from which the final experimental EEM group was derived.The prevalence of maxillary EEM was 2.5%.EEM may be a risk factor for maxillary arch constriction and severe tooth crowding.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Clinical Sciences and Traslation Medicine, University of Rome "Tor Vergata", Rome, Italy.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The aim of the study was to analyze the prevalence and distribution of ectopic eruption of the permanent maxillary first molar (EEM) in individuals scheduled for orthodontic treatment and to investigate the association of EEM with dental characteristics, maxillary skeletal features, crowding, and other dental anomalies.

Methods: A total of 1,317 individuals were included and randomly divided into two groups. The first 265 subjects were included as controls, while the remaining 1,052 subjects included the sample from which the final experimental EEM group was derived. The mesiodistal (M-D) crown width of the deciduous maxillary second molar and permanent maxillary first molar, maxillary arch length (A-PML), maxillomandibular transverse skeletal relationships (anterior and posterior transverse interarch discrepancies, ATID and PTID), maxillary and mandibular tooth crowding, and the presence of dental anomalies were recorded for each subject, and the statistical significance of differences in these parameters between the EEM and control groups was determined using independent sample t-tests. Chi-square tests were used to compare the prevalence of other dental anomalies between the two groups.

Results: The prevalence of maxillary EEM was 2.5%. The M-D crown widths, ATID and PTID, and tooth crowding were significantly greater, while A-PML was significantly smaller, in the EEM group than in the control group. Only two subjects showed an association between EEM and maxillary lateral incisor anomalies, which included agenesis in one and microdontia in the other.

Conclusions: EEM may be a risk factor for maxillary arch constriction and severe tooth crowding.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Study flow chart. EEM, Ectopic eruption of the permanent maxillary first molar; y, years; m, months.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4524958&req=5

Figure 1: Study flow chart. EEM, Ectopic eruption of the permanent maxillary first molar; y, years; m, months.

Mentions: According to the methodology of previous studies,1619 the study sample was randomly divided into two groups. The first 265 subjects, including 128 boys and 137 girls, were used as controls; the reference values for all examined parameters were calculated for this group. The remaining 1,052 subjects, including 500 boys and 552 girls with a mean age of 8 years and 3 months ± 1 year and 4 months, comprised the sample from which the final experimental group was derived; this group was investigated for the presence of EEM. In total, 26 subjects, including 14 boys and 12 girls with a mean age of 8 years and 2 months ± 9 months, were diagnosed with EEM in the experimental group and were identified as the EEM group (Figure 1). EEM was identified when the permanent first molar was initially blocked from complete eruption by the adjacent primary molar, which showed premature resorption on its distal surface (Figure 2). Two possible evolutions of EEM may follow: a reversible type, wherein the permanent molar frees itself and erupts to normal occlusion, and an irreversible type.21920 These two forms were not distinguished in the present study for the early mean age of the sample. The unilateral or bilateral intraosseous ectopic position of the permanent first molar was evaluated on panoramic radiographs.


Dentoskeletal features in individuals with ectopic eruption of the permanent maxillary first molar.

Mucedero M, Rozzi M, Cardoni G, Ricchiuti MR, Cozza P - Korean J Orthod (2015)

Study flow chart. EEM, Ectopic eruption of the permanent maxillary first molar; y, years; m, months.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4524958&req=5

Figure 1: Study flow chart. EEM, Ectopic eruption of the permanent maxillary first molar; y, years; m, months.
Mentions: According to the methodology of previous studies,1619 the study sample was randomly divided into two groups. The first 265 subjects, including 128 boys and 137 girls, were used as controls; the reference values for all examined parameters were calculated for this group. The remaining 1,052 subjects, including 500 boys and 552 girls with a mean age of 8 years and 3 months ± 1 year and 4 months, comprised the sample from which the final experimental group was derived; this group was investigated for the presence of EEM. In total, 26 subjects, including 14 boys and 12 girls with a mean age of 8 years and 2 months ± 9 months, were diagnosed with EEM in the experimental group and were identified as the EEM group (Figure 1). EEM was identified when the permanent first molar was initially blocked from complete eruption by the adjacent primary molar, which showed premature resorption on its distal surface (Figure 2). Two possible evolutions of EEM may follow: a reversible type, wherein the permanent molar frees itself and erupts to normal occlusion, and an irreversible type.21920 These two forms were not distinguished in the present study for the early mean age of the sample. The unilateral or bilateral intraosseous ectopic position of the permanent first molar was evaluated on panoramic radiographs.

Bottom Line: The first 265 subjects were included as controls, while the remaining 1,052 subjects included the sample from which the final experimental EEM group was derived.The prevalence of maxillary EEM was 2.5%.EEM may be a risk factor for maxillary arch constriction and severe tooth crowding.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Clinical Sciences and Traslation Medicine, University of Rome "Tor Vergata", Rome, Italy.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The aim of the study was to analyze the prevalence and distribution of ectopic eruption of the permanent maxillary first molar (EEM) in individuals scheduled for orthodontic treatment and to investigate the association of EEM with dental characteristics, maxillary skeletal features, crowding, and other dental anomalies.

Methods: A total of 1,317 individuals were included and randomly divided into two groups. The first 265 subjects were included as controls, while the remaining 1,052 subjects included the sample from which the final experimental EEM group was derived. The mesiodistal (M-D) crown width of the deciduous maxillary second molar and permanent maxillary first molar, maxillary arch length (A-PML), maxillomandibular transverse skeletal relationships (anterior and posterior transverse interarch discrepancies, ATID and PTID), maxillary and mandibular tooth crowding, and the presence of dental anomalies were recorded for each subject, and the statistical significance of differences in these parameters between the EEM and control groups was determined using independent sample t-tests. Chi-square tests were used to compare the prevalence of other dental anomalies between the two groups.

Results: The prevalence of maxillary EEM was 2.5%. The M-D crown widths, ATID and PTID, and tooth crowding were significantly greater, while A-PML was significantly smaller, in the EEM group than in the control group. Only two subjects showed an association between EEM and maxillary lateral incisor anomalies, which included agenesis in one and microdontia in the other.

Conclusions: EEM may be a risk factor for maxillary arch constriction and severe tooth crowding.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus