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Use of triazolam and alprazolam as premedication for general anesthesia.

Kim D, Lee S, Pyeon T, Jeong S - Korean J Anesthesiol (2015)

Bottom Line: As a memory test, we asked the patients the day after the surgery if they remembered being moved from the ward to the OR, and what object we had shown them in the OR.The postoperative interviews showed that 22.2% of the triazolam-treated patients experienced a loss of memory in the OR, against a 0% memory loss in the alprazolam-treated patients.In comparison with alprazolam 0.5 mg, triazolam 0.25 mg produced a higher incidence of amnesia without causing respiratory depression.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: Triazolam has similar pharmacological properties as other benzodiazepines and is generally used as a sedative to treat insomnia. Alprazolam represents a possible alternative to midazolam for the premedication of surgical patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the anxiolytic, sedative, and amnestic properties of triazolam and alprazolam as pre-anesthetic medications.

Methods: Sixty adult patients were randomly allocated to receive oral triazolam 0.25 mg or alprazolam 0.5 mg one hour prior to surgery. A structured assessment interview was performed in the operating room (OR), the recovery room, and the ward. The levels of anxiety and sedation were assessed on a 7-point scale (0 = relaxation to 6 = very severe anxiety) and a 5-point scale (0 = alert to 4 = lack of responsiveness), respectively. The psychomotor performance was estimated using a digit symbol substitution test. As a memory test, we asked the patients the day after the surgery if they remembered being moved from the ward to the OR, and what object we had shown them in the OR.

Results: There were no significant differences between the groups with respect to anxiety and sedation. The postoperative interviews showed that 22.2% of the triazolam-treated patients experienced a loss of memory in the OR, against a 0% memory loss in the alprazolam-treated patients. In comparison with alprazolam 0.5 mg, triazolam 0.25 mg produced a higher incidence of amnesia without causing respiratory depression.

Conclusions: Oral triazolam 0.25 mg can be an effective preanesthetic medication for psychomotor performance.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Changes in the digit-symbol substitution test (DSST) completion time (mean, SD) relative to time 0 (baseline), as assessed at time A (arrival in the operating room), time P (discharge from the postanesthesia care unit) and time D (discharge from the hospital). *P < 0.05 as compared with Group A.
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Figure 2: Changes in the digit-symbol substitution test (DSST) completion time (mean, SD) relative to time 0 (baseline), as assessed at time A (arrival in the operating room), time P (discharge from the postanesthesia care unit) and time D (discharge from the hospital). *P < 0.05 as compared with Group A.

Mentions: The DSST completion time was significant in the triazolam group (group T) when compared to that of the alprazolam group (group A) at all observed times (A, P and D) (Fig. 2).


Use of triazolam and alprazolam as premedication for general anesthesia.

Kim D, Lee S, Pyeon T, Jeong S - Korean J Anesthesiol (2015)

Changes in the digit-symbol substitution test (DSST) completion time (mean, SD) relative to time 0 (baseline), as assessed at time A (arrival in the operating room), time P (discharge from the postanesthesia care unit) and time D (discharge from the hospital). *P < 0.05 as compared with Group A.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4524932&req=5

Figure 2: Changes in the digit-symbol substitution test (DSST) completion time (mean, SD) relative to time 0 (baseline), as assessed at time A (arrival in the operating room), time P (discharge from the postanesthesia care unit) and time D (discharge from the hospital). *P < 0.05 as compared with Group A.
Mentions: The DSST completion time was significant in the triazolam group (group T) when compared to that of the alprazolam group (group A) at all observed times (A, P and D) (Fig. 2).

Bottom Line: As a memory test, we asked the patients the day after the surgery if they remembered being moved from the ward to the OR, and what object we had shown them in the OR.The postoperative interviews showed that 22.2% of the triazolam-treated patients experienced a loss of memory in the OR, against a 0% memory loss in the alprazolam-treated patients.In comparison with alprazolam 0.5 mg, triazolam 0.25 mg produced a higher incidence of amnesia without causing respiratory depression.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: Triazolam has similar pharmacological properties as other benzodiazepines and is generally used as a sedative to treat insomnia. Alprazolam represents a possible alternative to midazolam for the premedication of surgical patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the anxiolytic, sedative, and amnestic properties of triazolam and alprazolam as pre-anesthetic medications.

Methods: Sixty adult patients were randomly allocated to receive oral triazolam 0.25 mg or alprazolam 0.5 mg one hour prior to surgery. A structured assessment interview was performed in the operating room (OR), the recovery room, and the ward. The levels of anxiety and sedation were assessed on a 7-point scale (0 = relaxation to 6 = very severe anxiety) and a 5-point scale (0 = alert to 4 = lack of responsiveness), respectively. The psychomotor performance was estimated using a digit symbol substitution test. As a memory test, we asked the patients the day after the surgery if they remembered being moved from the ward to the OR, and what object we had shown them in the OR.

Results: There were no significant differences between the groups with respect to anxiety and sedation. The postoperative interviews showed that 22.2% of the triazolam-treated patients experienced a loss of memory in the OR, against a 0% memory loss in the alprazolam-treated patients. In comparison with alprazolam 0.5 mg, triazolam 0.25 mg produced a higher incidence of amnesia without causing respiratory depression.

Conclusions: Oral triazolam 0.25 mg can be an effective preanesthetic medication for psychomotor performance.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus