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Ebola a reality of modern Public Health; need for Surveillance, Preparedness and Response Training for Health Workers and other multidisciplinary teams: a case for Uganda.

Bazeyo W, Bagonza J, Halage A, Okure G, Mugagga M, Musoke R, Tumwebaze M, Tusiime S, Ssendagire S, Nabukenya I, Pande S, Aanyu C, Etajak S, Rutebemberwa E - Pan Afr Med J (2015)

Bottom Line: It is possible that lack of community understanding of the epidemic and lack of institutional memory and inexperienced health workers could have led to the rapid spread of the disease.Evaluation results demonstrated a gain in knowledge and skills.Epidemic Preparedness and Response plans were also developed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Public Health, Makerere University College of Health sciences.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: West Africa is experiencing the largest ever reported Ebola outbreak. Over 20,000 people have been infected of which about 9000 have died. It is possible that lack of community understanding of the epidemic and lack of institutional memory and inexperienced health workers could have led to the rapid spread of the disease. In this paper, we share Uganda's experiences on how the capacity of health workers and other multidisciplinary teams can be improved in preparing and responding to Ebola outbreaks.

Methods: Makerere University School of Public Health in collaboration with the Ministry of Health and the African Field Epidemiology Network (AFENET), trained health care workers and other multidisciplinary teams from six border districts of Uganda so as to increase their alertness and response capabilities towards Ebola. We used participatory training methods to impart knowledge and skills and guided participants to develop district epidemic response plans. Communities were sensitized about Ebola through mass media, IEC materials, and infection control and prevention materials were distributed in districts.

Results: We trained 210 health workers and 120 other multidisciplinary team members on Ebola surveillance, preparedness and response. Evaluation results demonstrated a gain in knowledge and skills. Communities were sensitized about Ebola and Districts received person protective equipments and items for infection prevention. Epidemic Preparedness and Response plans were also developed.

Conclusion: Training of multidisciplinary teams improves the country's preparedness, alertness and response capabilities in controlling Ebola. West African countries experiencing Ebola outbreaks could draw lessons from the Uganda experience to contain the outbreak.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Participant demonstrating PPE removal process under the guidance of the facilitator
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Figure 0004: Participant demonstrating PPE removal process under the guidance of the facilitator

Mentions: During the course of training it was noted that the topics that were highlighted as most relevant and applicable to participants’ work include:- a) Infection Prevention in Health care settings b) Developing Epidemic Preparedness and Response (EPR) Plans c) Management of Ebola d) Standard precautions for infection control e) Alert and surveillance, specimen collection, processing, packaging and shipping f) Mixing Jik/chlorine/bleach/Chlorex for elimination of germs g) Reconstituting Chlorine solution for infection control h) PPE dressing and undressing procedures i) Implementation EPR Plans j) Barrier nursing and care of patients k) Clinical management of Ebola l) Disease surveillance m) Hand washing n) Case definitions (Figure 3, Figure 4)


Ebola a reality of modern Public Health; need for Surveillance, Preparedness and Response Training for Health Workers and other multidisciplinary teams: a case for Uganda.

Bazeyo W, Bagonza J, Halage A, Okure G, Mugagga M, Musoke R, Tumwebaze M, Tusiime S, Ssendagire S, Nabukenya I, Pande S, Aanyu C, Etajak S, Rutebemberwa E - Pan Afr Med J (2015)

Participant demonstrating PPE removal process under the guidance of the facilitator
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4524909&req=5

Figure 0004: Participant demonstrating PPE removal process under the guidance of the facilitator
Mentions: During the course of training it was noted that the topics that were highlighted as most relevant and applicable to participants’ work include:- a) Infection Prevention in Health care settings b) Developing Epidemic Preparedness and Response (EPR) Plans c) Management of Ebola d) Standard precautions for infection control e) Alert and surveillance, specimen collection, processing, packaging and shipping f) Mixing Jik/chlorine/bleach/Chlorex for elimination of germs g) Reconstituting Chlorine solution for infection control h) PPE dressing and undressing procedures i) Implementation EPR Plans j) Barrier nursing and care of patients k) Clinical management of Ebola l) Disease surveillance m) Hand washing n) Case definitions (Figure 3, Figure 4)

Bottom Line: It is possible that lack of community understanding of the epidemic and lack of institutional memory and inexperienced health workers could have led to the rapid spread of the disease.Evaluation results demonstrated a gain in knowledge and skills.Epidemic Preparedness and Response plans were also developed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Public Health, Makerere University College of Health sciences.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: West Africa is experiencing the largest ever reported Ebola outbreak. Over 20,000 people have been infected of which about 9000 have died. It is possible that lack of community understanding of the epidemic and lack of institutional memory and inexperienced health workers could have led to the rapid spread of the disease. In this paper, we share Uganda's experiences on how the capacity of health workers and other multidisciplinary teams can be improved in preparing and responding to Ebola outbreaks.

Methods: Makerere University School of Public Health in collaboration with the Ministry of Health and the African Field Epidemiology Network (AFENET), trained health care workers and other multidisciplinary teams from six border districts of Uganda so as to increase their alertness and response capabilities towards Ebola. We used participatory training methods to impart knowledge and skills and guided participants to develop district epidemic response plans. Communities were sensitized about Ebola through mass media, IEC materials, and infection control and prevention materials were distributed in districts.

Results: We trained 210 health workers and 120 other multidisciplinary team members on Ebola surveillance, preparedness and response. Evaluation results demonstrated a gain in knowledge and skills. Communities were sensitized about Ebola and Districts received person protective equipments and items for infection prevention. Epidemic Preparedness and Response plans were also developed.

Conclusion: Training of multidisciplinary teams improves the country's preparedness, alertness and response capabilities in controlling Ebola. West African countries experiencing Ebola outbreaks could draw lessons from the Uganda experience to contain the outbreak.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus