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Ebola a reality of modern Public Health; need for Surveillance, Preparedness and Response Training for Health Workers and other multidisciplinary teams: a case for Uganda.

Bazeyo W, Bagonza J, Halage A, Okure G, Mugagga M, Musoke R, Tumwebaze M, Tusiime S, Ssendagire S, Nabukenya I, Pande S, Aanyu C, Etajak S, Rutebemberwa E - Pan Afr Med J (2015)

Bottom Line: It is possible that lack of community understanding of the epidemic and lack of institutional memory and inexperienced health workers could have led to the rapid spread of the disease.Evaluation results demonstrated a gain in knowledge and skills.Epidemic Preparedness and Response plans were also developed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Public Health, Makerere University College of Health sciences.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: West Africa is experiencing the largest ever reported Ebola outbreak. Over 20,000 people have been infected of which about 9000 have died. It is possible that lack of community understanding of the epidemic and lack of institutional memory and inexperienced health workers could have led to the rapid spread of the disease. In this paper, we share Uganda's experiences on how the capacity of health workers and other multidisciplinary teams can be improved in preparing and responding to Ebola outbreaks.

Methods: Makerere University School of Public Health in collaboration with the Ministry of Health and the African Field Epidemiology Network (AFENET), trained health care workers and other multidisciplinary teams from six border districts of Uganda so as to increase their alertness and response capabilities towards Ebola. We used participatory training methods to impart knowledge and skills and guided participants to develop district epidemic response plans. Communities were sensitized about Ebola through mass media, IEC materials, and infection control and prevention materials were distributed in districts.

Results: We trained 210 health workers and 120 other multidisciplinary team members on Ebola surveillance, preparedness and response. Evaluation results demonstrated a gain in knowledge and skills. Communities were sensitized about Ebola and Districts received person protective equipments and items for infection prevention. Epidemic Preparedness and Response plans were also developed.

Conclusion: Training of multidisciplinary teams improves the country's preparedness, alertness and response capabilities in controlling Ebola. West African countries experiencing Ebola outbreaks could draw lessons from the Uganda experience to contain the outbreak.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

During the radio talk show at a Radio station in Tororo
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Figure 0002: During the radio talk show at a Radio station in Tororo

Mentions: Community engagement Radio talk show Three facilitators, and the district health educator were hosted on live call-in Health talked shows in both Tororo District In Kabale, the talk show was held at Radio West (FM 94.3) from 7PM to 9PM these being the pick time for the communities to be attending or listening to news and local informative programs. In Kisoro and Kasese districts radio the talk shows were held at voice of Muhabura 88.9 FM and Radio Messiah 97.5 FM respectively. These radio talk shows have in the past shown to be effective in mobilising the communities for a common goal [16]. The facilitators were given an opportunity talk about Ebola facts. Thereafter, the lines was then a live question and answer session with the listeners (Figure 2).


Ebola a reality of modern Public Health; need for Surveillance, Preparedness and Response Training for Health Workers and other multidisciplinary teams: a case for Uganda.

Bazeyo W, Bagonza J, Halage A, Okure G, Mugagga M, Musoke R, Tumwebaze M, Tusiime S, Ssendagire S, Nabukenya I, Pande S, Aanyu C, Etajak S, Rutebemberwa E - Pan Afr Med J (2015)

During the radio talk show at a Radio station in Tororo
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4524909&req=5

Figure 0002: During the radio talk show at a Radio station in Tororo
Mentions: Community engagement Radio talk show Three facilitators, and the district health educator were hosted on live call-in Health talked shows in both Tororo District In Kabale, the talk show was held at Radio West (FM 94.3) from 7PM to 9PM these being the pick time for the communities to be attending or listening to news and local informative programs. In Kisoro and Kasese districts radio the talk shows were held at voice of Muhabura 88.9 FM and Radio Messiah 97.5 FM respectively. These radio talk shows have in the past shown to be effective in mobilising the communities for a common goal [16]. The facilitators were given an opportunity talk about Ebola facts. Thereafter, the lines was then a live question and answer session with the listeners (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: It is possible that lack of community understanding of the epidemic and lack of institutional memory and inexperienced health workers could have led to the rapid spread of the disease.Evaluation results demonstrated a gain in knowledge and skills.Epidemic Preparedness and Response plans were also developed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Public Health, Makerere University College of Health sciences.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: West Africa is experiencing the largest ever reported Ebola outbreak. Over 20,000 people have been infected of which about 9000 have died. It is possible that lack of community understanding of the epidemic and lack of institutional memory and inexperienced health workers could have led to the rapid spread of the disease. In this paper, we share Uganda's experiences on how the capacity of health workers and other multidisciplinary teams can be improved in preparing and responding to Ebola outbreaks.

Methods: Makerere University School of Public Health in collaboration with the Ministry of Health and the African Field Epidemiology Network (AFENET), trained health care workers and other multidisciplinary teams from six border districts of Uganda so as to increase their alertness and response capabilities towards Ebola. We used participatory training methods to impart knowledge and skills and guided participants to develop district epidemic response plans. Communities were sensitized about Ebola through mass media, IEC materials, and infection control and prevention materials were distributed in districts.

Results: We trained 210 health workers and 120 other multidisciplinary team members on Ebola surveillance, preparedness and response. Evaluation results demonstrated a gain in knowledge and skills. Communities were sensitized about Ebola and Districts received person protective equipments and items for infection prevention. Epidemic Preparedness and Response plans were also developed.

Conclusion: Training of multidisciplinary teams improves the country's preparedness, alertness and response capabilities in controlling Ebola. West African countries experiencing Ebola outbreaks could draw lessons from the Uganda experience to contain the outbreak.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus