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How Does Physical Activity Intervention Improve Self-Esteem and Self-Concept in Children and Adolescents? Evidence from a Meta-Analysis.

Liu M, Wu L, Ming Q - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: There was no significant effect of intervention of physical activity alone on any outcomes in non-RCTs, as well as in studies with intervention of physical activity combined with other strategies.Meta-regression analysis revealed that higher treatment effects were associated with setting of intervention in RCTs (β = 0.31, 95%CI: 0.07 to 0.55, p = 0.013).And there is a stronger association with school-based and gymnasium-based intervention compared with other settings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Medical Psychological Institute, Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, 410011, China; School of Education, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan, Hunan, 411201, China.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis for the effects of physical activity intervention on self-esteem and self-concept in children and adolescents, and to identify moderator variables by meta-regression.

Design: A meta-analysis and meta-regression.

Method: Relevant studies were identified through a comprehensive search of electronic databases. Study inclusion criteria were: (1) intervention should be supervised physical activity, (2) reported sufficient data to estimate pooled effect sizes of physical activity intervention on self-esteem or self-concept, (3) participants' ages ranged from 3 to 20 years, and (4) a control or comparison group was included. For each study, study design, intervention design and participant characteristics were extracted. R software (version 3.1.3) and Stata (version 12.0) were used to synthesize effect sizes and perform moderation analyses for determining moderators.

Results: Twenty-five randomized controlled trial (RCT) studies and 13 non-randomized controlled trial (non-RCT) studies including a total of 2991 cases were identified. Significant positive effects were found in RCTs for intervention of physical activity alone on general self outcomes (Hedges' g = 0.29, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.14 to 0.45; p = 0.001), self-concept (Hedges' g = 0.49, 95%CI: 0.10 to 0.88, p = 0.014) and self-worth (Hedges' g = 0.31, 95%CI: 0.13 to 0.49, p = 0.005). There was no significant effect of intervention of physical activity alone on any outcomes in non-RCTs, as well as in studies with intervention of physical activity combined with other strategies. Meta-regression analysis revealed that higher treatment effects were associated with setting of intervention in RCTs (β = 0.31, 95%CI: 0.07 to 0.55, p = 0.013).

Conclusion: Intervention of physical activity alone is associated with increased self-concept and self-worth in children and adolescents. And there is a stronger association with school-based and gymnasium-based intervention compared with other settings.

No MeSH data available.


Flow chart of article screening process.
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pone.0134804.g001: Flow chart of article screening process.

Mentions: After article screening, 38 studies with 39 reports (one study[50] reported results stratified by gender) including 2991 participants (1683 in treatment group and 1308 in control group) fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were included in the final analysis (Fig 1). Most of included studies were conducted in the United States (N = 18), and others were conducted in various countries including: Australia (N = 4), United Kingdom (N = 3), China (N = 2), Netherlands (N = 2), Sweden (N = 2), Canada (N = 1), Germany (N = 1), Israel (N = 1), Portugal (N = 1), South Africa (N = 1), Spain (N = 1), and Switzerland (N = 1).


How Does Physical Activity Intervention Improve Self-Esteem and Self-Concept in Children and Adolescents? Evidence from a Meta-Analysis.

Liu M, Wu L, Ming Q - PLoS ONE (2015)

Flow chart of article screening process.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4524727&req=5

pone.0134804.g001: Flow chart of article screening process.
Mentions: After article screening, 38 studies with 39 reports (one study[50] reported results stratified by gender) including 2991 participants (1683 in treatment group and 1308 in control group) fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were included in the final analysis (Fig 1). Most of included studies were conducted in the United States (N = 18), and others were conducted in various countries including: Australia (N = 4), United Kingdom (N = 3), China (N = 2), Netherlands (N = 2), Sweden (N = 2), Canada (N = 1), Germany (N = 1), Israel (N = 1), Portugal (N = 1), South Africa (N = 1), Spain (N = 1), and Switzerland (N = 1).

Bottom Line: There was no significant effect of intervention of physical activity alone on any outcomes in non-RCTs, as well as in studies with intervention of physical activity combined with other strategies.Meta-regression analysis revealed that higher treatment effects were associated with setting of intervention in RCTs (β = 0.31, 95%CI: 0.07 to 0.55, p = 0.013).And there is a stronger association with school-based and gymnasium-based intervention compared with other settings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Medical Psychological Institute, Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, 410011, China; School of Education, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan, Hunan, 411201, China.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis for the effects of physical activity intervention on self-esteem and self-concept in children and adolescents, and to identify moderator variables by meta-regression.

Design: A meta-analysis and meta-regression.

Method: Relevant studies were identified through a comprehensive search of electronic databases. Study inclusion criteria were: (1) intervention should be supervised physical activity, (2) reported sufficient data to estimate pooled effect sizes of physical activity intervention on self-esteem or self-concept, (3) participants' ages ranged from 3 to 20 years, and (4) a control or comparison group was included. For each study, study design, intervention design and participant characteristics were extracted. R software (version 3.1.3) and Stata (version 12.0) were used to synthesize effect sizes and perform moderation analyses for determining moderators.

Results: Twenty-five randomized controlled trial (RCT) studies and 13 non-randomized controlled trial (non-RCT) studies including a total of 2991 cases were identified. Significant positive effects were found in RCTs for intervention of physical activity alone on general self outcomes (Hedges' g = 0.29, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.14 to 0.45; p = 0.001), self-concept (Hedges' g = 0.49, 95%CI: 0.10 to 0.88, p = 0.014) and self-worth (Hedges' g = 0.31, 95%CI: 0.13 to 0.49, p = 0.005). There was no significant effect of intervention of physical activity alone on any outcomes in non-RCTs, as well as in studies with intervention of physical activity combined with other strategies. Meta-regression analysis revealed that higher treatment effects were associated with setting of intervention in RCTs (β = 0.31, 95%CI: 0.07 to 0.55, p = 0.013).

Conclusion: Intervention of physical activity alone is associated with increased self-concept and self-worth in children and adolescents. And there is a stronger association with school-based and gymnasium-based intervention compared with other settings.

No MeSH data available.