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Variation in the X:Autosome Distribution of Male-Biased Genes among Drosophila melanogaster Tissues and Its Relationship with Dosage Compensation.

Huylmans AK, Parsch J - Genome Biol Evol (2015)

Bottom Line: Previous studies of Drosophila melanogaster found a general paucity of male-biased genes on the X chromosome, although this is mainly limited to comparisons of whole flies or body segments containing the reproductive organs.The brain and head also differ from other tissues in that their male-biased genes are significantly closer to binding sites of the dosage compensation complex.We propose that the interplay of dosage compensation and sex-specific regulation can explain the observed differences between tissues and reconcile disparate results reported in previous studies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Biology, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Planegg, Germany.

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Degree of male-biased expression for the MBG in each data set (table 1). The Y axis shows the percentage of MBG that fall into each expression category.
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evv117-F3: Degree of male-biased expression for the MBG in each data set (table 1). The Y axis shows the percentage of MBG that fall into each expression category.

Mentions: In the above analyses, all MBG were placed in one category, regardless of the extent of their male-biased expression. However, within the MBG there are some striking differences among tissues in the degree of male-biased expression. For the brain and head data sets, only a small proportion of genes (5–20%) show more than a 2-fold male bias in their expression. For all of the other data sets, this proportion is higher, ranging from 30% to 90% (fig. 3). Similarly, the proportion of genes with greater than 4- or 6-fold male bias is less in the brain and head than in all other tissues (fig. 3).Fig. 3.—


Variation in the X:Autosome Distribution of Male-Biased Genes among Drosophila melanogaster Tissues and Its Relationship with Dosage Compensation.

Huylmans AK, Parsch J - Genome Biol Evol (2015)

Degree of male-biased expression for the MBG in each data set (table 1). The Y axis shows the percentage of MBG that fall into each expression category.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4524484&req=5

evv117-F3: Degree of male-biased expression for the MBG in each data set (table 1). The Y axis shows the percentage of MBG that fall into each expression category.
Mentions: In the above analyses, all MBG were placed in one category, regardless of the extent of their male-biased expression. However, within the MBG there are some striking differences among tissues in the degree of male-biased expression. For the brain and head data sets, only a small proportion of genes (5–20%) show more than a 2-fold male bias in their expression. For all of the other data sets, this proportion is higher, ranging from 30% to 90% (fig. 3). Similarly, the proportion of genes with greater than 4- or 6-fold male bias is less in the brain and head than in all other tissues (fig. 3).Fig. 3.—

Bottom Line: Previous studies of Drosophila melanogaster found a general paucity of male-biased genes on the X chromosome, although this is mainly limited to comparisons of whole flies or body segments containing the reproductive organs.The brain and head also differ from other tissues in that their male-biased genes are significantly closer to binding sites of the dosage compensation complex.We propose that the interplay of dosage compensation and sex-specific regulation can explain the observed differences between tissues and reconcile disparate results reported in previous studies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Biology, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Planegg, Germany.

Show MeSH