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A case of blowout fracture of the orbital floor in early childhood.

Sugamata A, Yoshizawa N - Int Med Case Rep J (2015)

Bottom Line: The patient was treated conservatively due to the absence of abnormal limitation of eye movement or enophthalmos.The patient did not develop any complications that necessitated later surgical intervention.We herein present our case and the details of six other cases reported in the literature, and discuss their etiology, diagnosis, and treatment methods.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Tokyo Medical University Hachioji Medical Center, Tokyo, Japan.

ABSTRACT
There are few reports of blowout fractures of the orbital floor in children younger than 5 years of age; in a search of the literature, we found only six reported cases which revealed the exact age, correct diagnosis, and treatment. We herein report the case of a 3-year-old boy with a blowout fracture of the orbital floor. Computed tomography showed a pure blowout fracture of the left orbital floor with a slight dislocation of the orbital contents. The patient was treated conservatively due to the absence of abnormal limitation of eye movement or enophthalmos. The patient did not develop any complications that necessitated later surgical intervention. Computed tomography at 6 months after the injury showed the regeneration of the orbital floor in the area of the fracture and no abnormalities in the left maxillary sinus. We herein present our case and the details of six other cases reported in the literature, and discuss their etiology, diagnosis, and treatment methods.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Computed tomography of a boy of 3 years and 3 months of age showing a pure blowout fracture of the left orbital floor with a slight dislocation of orbital contents.Note: There was no abnormality in his ocular movement.
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f1-imcrj-8-155: Computed tomography of a boy of 3 years and 3 months of age showing a pure blowout fracture of the left orbital floor with a slight dislocation of orbital contents.Note: There was no abnormality in his ocular movement.

Mentions: A boy of 3 years and 3 months of age was reported to have fallen from the front child seat of a bicycle. The boy’s mother reported no history of loss of consciousness or vomiting. The boy was taken to the neurosurgery section of a local hospital. A computed tomography (CT) scan was performed at the local hospital and showed a pure blowout fracture of the left orbital floor with a slight dislocation of the orbital contents. No brain abnormalities were observed. He was referred by the local hospital with an indication for surgery to repair his blowout fracture on the same day. A facial examination revealed no abnormalities with the exception of a small subcutaneous ecchymosis in the left lower eyelid. A medical examination revealed that there was no abnormal limitation of eye movement or enophthalmos (Figure 1). A fundoscopy also revealed no abnormal findings in the vitreous body or the retina. Due to the lack of clinical symptoms, we selected the conservative option of observation without surgery. The patient did not develop any complications that necessitated later surgical intervention.


A case of blowout fracture of the orbital floor in early childhood.

Sugamata A, Yoshizawa N - Int Med Case Rep J (2015)

Computed tomography of a boy of 3 years and 3 months of age showing a pure blowout fracture of the left orbital floor with a slight dislocation of orbital contents.Note: There was no abnormality in his ocular movement.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4524468&req=5

f1-imcrj-8-155: Computed tomography of a boy of 3 years and 3 months of age showing a pure blowout fracture of the left orbital floor with a slight dislocation of orbital contents.Note: There was no abnormality in his ocular movement.
Mentions: A boy of 3 years and 3 months of age was reported to have fallen from the front child seat of a bicycle. The boy’s mother reported no history of loss of consciousness or vomiting. The boy was taken to the neurosurgery section of a local hospital. A computed tomography (CT) scan was performed at the local hospital and showed a pure blowout fracture of the left orbital floor with a slight dislocation of the orbital contents. No brain abnormalities were observed. He was referred by the local hospital with an indication for surgery to repair his blowout fracture on the same day. A facial examination revealed no abnormalities with the exception of a small subcutaneous ecchymosis in the left lower eyelid. A medical examination revealed that there was no abnormal limitation of eye movement or enophthalmos (Figure 1). A fundoscopy also revealed no abnormal findings in the vitreous body or the retina. Due to the lack of clinical symptoms, we selected the conservative option of observation without surgery. The patient did not develop any complications that necessitated later surgical intervention.

Bottom Line: The patient was treated conservatively due to the absence of abnormal limitation of eye movement or enophthalmos.The patient did not develop any complications that necessitated later surgical intervention.We herein present our case and the details of six other cases reported in the literature, and discuss their etiology, diagnosis, and treatment methods.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Tokyo Medical University Hachioji Medical Center, Tokyo, Japan.

ABSTRACT
There are few reports of blowout fractures of the orbital floor in children younger than 5 years of age; in a search of the literature, we found only six reported cases which revealed the exact age, correct diagnosis, and treatment. We herein report the case of a 3-year-old boy with a blowout fracture of the orbital floor. Computed tomography showed a pure blowout fracture of the left orbital floor with a slight dislocation of the orbital contents. The patient was treated conservatively due to the absence of abnormal limitation of eye movement or enophthalmos. The patient did not develop any complications that necessitated later surgical intervention. Computed tomography at 6 months after the injury showed the regeneration of the orbital floor in the area of the fracture and no abnormalities in the left maxillary sinus. We herein present our case and the details of six other cases reported in the literature, and discuss their etiology, diagnosis, and treatment methods.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus