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Ultrasmall cationic superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as nontoxic and efficient MRI contrast agent and magnetic-targeting tool.

Uchiyama MK, Toma SH, Rodrigues SF, Shimada AL, Loiola RA, Cervantes Rodríguez HJ, Oliveira PV, Luz MS, Rabbani SR, Toma HE, Poliselli Farsky SH, Araki K - Int J Nanomedicine (2015)

Bottom Line: The nanoparticles are cleared from kidneys and bladder in few days, whereas the complete elimination from liver and spleen occurred only after 4 weeks.In addition, they were readily concentrated in rat thigh by a magnet showing its potential as magnetically targeted carriers of therapeutic and diagnostic agents.Summarizing, cationic ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are nontoxic and efficient magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents useful as platform for the development of new materials for application in theranostics.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Supramolecular Chemistry and Nanotechnology, Department of Fundamental Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Fully dispersible, cationic ultrasmall (7 nm diameter) superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, exhibiting high relaxivity (178 mM(-1)s(-1) in 0.47 T) and no acute or subchronic toxicity in Wistar rats, were studied and their suitability as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging and material for development of new diagnostic and treatment tools demonstrated. After intravenous injection (10 mg/kg body weight), they circulated throughout the vascular system causing no microhemorrhage or thrombus, neither inflammatory processes at the mesentery vascular bed and hepatic sinusoids (leukocyte rolling, adhesion, or migration as evaluated by intravital microscopy), but having been spontaneously concentrated in the liver, spleen, and kidneys, they caused strong negative contrast. The nanoparticles are cleared from kidneys and bladder in few days, whereas the complete elimination from liver and spleen occurred only after 4 weeks. Ex vivo studies demonstrated that cationic ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles caused no effects on hepatic and renal enzymes dosage as well as on leukocyte count. In addition, they were readily concentrated in rat thigh by a magnet showing its potential as magnetically targeted carriers of therapeutic and diagnostic agents. Summarizing, cationic ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are nontoxic and efficient magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents useful as platform for the development of new materials for application in theranostics.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Typical series of MRI images of a Wistar rat treated with 50 mg/kg of cat-USPIOs as a function of time from zero up to 140 days after IV administration, highlighting the contrast in liver and spleen.Notes: The negative contrast in the left thigh is due to the accumulation of cat-USPIOs induced by a magnet placed on that local for 2 hours after IV injection. The liver and the spleen are indicated by a yellow rectangle; and a blue circle indicates the negative contrast in the thigh.Abbreviations: cat-USPIOs, cationic ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles; MRI, magnetic resonance imaging; IV, intravenous.
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f3-ijn-10-4731: Typical series of MRI images of a Wistar rat treated with 50 mg/kg of cat-USPIOs as a function of time from zero up to 140 days after IV administration, highlighting the contrast in liver and spleen.Notes: The negative contrast in the left thigh is due to the accumulation of cat-USPIOs induced by a magnet placed on that local for 2 hours after IV injection. The liver and the spleen are indicated by a yellow rectangle; and a blue circle indicates the negative contrast in the thigh.Abbreviations: cat-USPIOs, cationic ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles; MRI, magnetic resonance imaging; IV, intravenous.

Mentions: A typical sequence of MRI images of a rat is shown in Figures 2 and 3. Notice in the control slice that the kidneys (yellow circles in Figure 2A), and also liver and spleen (yellow rectangle in Figure 3), appear as bright regions. The lower lateral region of abdominal cavity appears as a darker region due to the presence of air in between or inside organs. Thus, intestines and lungs appear as black areas due to the air inside. However, after injection of cat-USPIOs, there is an increase of dark areas in the upper abdominal cavity as they concentrate in the kidneys (Figure 2A), liver, and also possibly in the spleen (Figure 3), as described for other SPIOs.13,26,27 Nevertheless, no other organs seem to concentrate magnetite nanoparticles. The injection was carried out through the cannulated femoral vein, slowly for 10 minutes, to avoid any damage caused by fast injection or exceedingly high local concentration of magnetite nanoparticles.


Ultrasmall cationic superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as nontoxic and efficient MRI contrast agent and magnetic-targeting tool.

Uchiyama MK, Toma SH, Rodrigues SF, Shimada AL, Loiola RA, Cervantes Rodríguez HJ, Oliveira PV, Luz MS, Rabbani SR, Toma HE, Poliselli Farsky SH, Araki K - Int J Nanomedicine (2015)

Typical series of MRI images of a Wistar rat treated with 50 mg/kg of cat-USPIOs as a function of time from zero up to 140 days after IV administration, highlighting the contrast in liver and spleen.Notes: The negative contrast in the left thigh is due to the accumulation of cat-USPIOs induced by a magnet placed on that local for 2 hours after IV injection. The liver and the spleen are indicated by a yellow rectangle; and a blue circle indicates the negative contrast in the thigh.Abbreviations: cat-USPIOs, cationic ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles; MRI, magnetic resonance imaging; IV, intravenous.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4524456&req=5

f3-ijn-10-4731: Typical series of MRI images of a Wistar rat treated with 50 mg/kg of cat-USPIOs as a function of time from zero up to 140 days after IV administration, highlighting the contrast in liver and spleen.Notes: The negative contrast in the left thigh is due to the accumulation of cat-USPIOs induced by a magnet placed on that local for 2 hours after IV injection. The liver and the spleen are indicated by a yellow rectangle; and a blue circle indicates the negative contrast in the thigh.Abbreviations: cat-USPIOs, cationic ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles; MRI, magnetic resonance imaging; IV, intravenous.
Mentions: A typical sequence of MRI images of a rat is shown in Figures 2 and 3. Notice in the control slice that the kidneys (yellow circles in Figure 2A), and also liver and spleen (yellow rectangle in Figure 3), appear as bright regions. The lower lateral region of abdominal cavity appears as a darker region due to the presence of air in between or inside organs. Thus, intestines and lungs appear as black areas due to the air inside. However, after injection of cat-USPIOs, there is an increase of dark areas in the upper abdominal cavity as they concentrate in the kidneys (Figure 2A), liver, and also possibly in the spleen (Figure 3), as described for other SPIOs.13,26,27 Nevertheless, no other organs seem to concentrate magnetite nanoparticles. The injection was carried out through the cannulated femoral vein, slowly for 10 minutes, to avoid any damage caused by fast injection or exceedingly high local concentration of magnetite nanoparticles.

Bottom Line: The nanoparticles are cleared from kidneys and bladder in few days, whereas the complete elimination from liver and spleen occurred only after 4 weeks.In addition, they were readily concentrated in rat thigh by a magnet showing its potential as magnetically targeted carriers of therapeutic and diagnostic agents.Summarizing, cationic ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are nontoxic and efficient magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents useful as platform for the development of new materials for application in theranostics.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Supramolecular Chemistry and Nanotechnology, Department of Fundamental Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Fully dispersible, cationic ultrasmall (7 nm diameter) superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, exhibiting high relaxivity (178 mM(-1)s(-1) in 0.47 T) and no acute or subchronic toxicity in Wistar rats, were studied and their suitability as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging and material for development of new diagnostic and treatment tools demonstrated. After intravenous injection (10 mg/kg body weight), they circulated throughout the vascular system causing no microhemorrhage or thrombus, neither inflammatory processes at the mesentery vascular bed and hepatic sinusoids (leukocyte rolling, adhesion, or migration as evaluated by intravital microscopy), but having been spontaneously concentrated in the liver, spleen, and kidneys, they caused strong negative contrast. The nanoparticles are cleared from kidneys and bladder in few days, whereas the complete elimination from liver and spleen occurred only after 4 weeks. Ex vivo studies demonstrated that cationic ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles caused no effects on hepatic and renal enzymes dosage as well as on leukocyte count. In addition, they were readily concentrated in rat thigh by a magnet showing its potential as magnetically targeted carriers of therapeutic and diagnostic agents. Summarizing, cationic ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are nontoxic and efficient magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents useful as platform for the development of new materials for application in theranostics.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus