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Mosquito species (Diptera, Culicidae) in three ecosystems from the Colombian Andes: identification through DNA barcoding and adult morphology.

Rozo-Lopez P, Mengual X - Zookeys (2015)

Bottom Line: We examined the usefulness of DNA barcodes to discriminate mosquito species from the Neotropics by compiling 1,292 sequences from a total of 133 species and using the tree-based methods of neighbor-joining and maximum likelihood.Both methodologies provided similar results by resolving 105 species of mosquitoes separated into distinct clusters.This study shows the importance of combining classic morphological methodologies with molecular tools to accurately identify mosquitoes from Colombia.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn. An der Immenburg 1, 53121 Bonn, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Colombia, one of the world's megadiverse countries, has a highly diverse mosquito fauna and a high prevalence of mosquito-borne diseases. In order to provide relevant information about the diversity and taxonomy of mosquito species in Colombia and to test the usefulness of DNA barcodes, mosquito species collected at different elevations in the departments of Antioquia and Caldas were identified combining adult morphology and barcode sequences. A total of 22 mosquito species from eight genera were identified using these combined techniques. We generated 77 barcode sequences with 16 species submitted as new country records for public databases. We examined the usefulness of DNA barcodes to discriminate mosquito species from the Neotropics by compiling 1,292 sequences from a total of 133 species and using the tree-based methods of neighbor-joining and maximum likelihood. Both methodologies provided similar results by resolving 105 species of mosquitoes separated into distinct clusters. This study shows the importance of combining classic morphological methodologies with molecular tools to accurately identify mosquitoes from Colombia.

No MeSH data available.


Maximum likelihood tree of the barcoding sequences of mosquito species listed for the Neotropics. Terminal branches have been collapsed in order to save space (see original tree in Suppl. material 7 and 8). Branches in colors indicate non-monophyletic genera. Red clusters represent groups with problems to discriminate species. Names with green asterisk indicate non-monophyletic species. Bootstrap values above 60 (1,000 replicates) are given at the nodes.
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Figure 3: Maximum likelihood tree of the barcoding sequences of mosquito species listed for the Neotropics. Terminal branches have been collapsed in order to save space (see original tree in Suppl. material 7 and 8). Branches in colors indicate non-monophyletic genera. Red clusters represent groups with problems to discriminate species. Names with green asterisk indicate non-monophyletic species. Bootstrap values above 60 (1,000 replicates) are given at the nodes.

Mentions: The likelihood score for the best ML tree was –31,760.30891. The overall topologies of the ML (Fig. 3) and NJ trees compared favorably with exception of Coquillettidia, Culex, and Stegomyia, which resolved as monophyletic clusters. The ML tree revealed 92 species clusters with high bootstrap (95–99). The bootstrap on the remaining 13 species ranged from 65 to 93. ML analysis also recovered 28 species as non-monophyletic groups.


Mosquito species (Diptera, Culicidae) in three ecosystems from the Colombian Andes: identification through DNA barcoding and adult morphology.

Rozo-Lopez P, Mengual X - Zookeys (2015)

Maximum likelihood tree of the barcoding sequences of mosquito species listed for the Neotropics. Terminal branches have been collapsed in order to save space (see original tree in Suppl. material 7 and 8). Branches in colors indicate non-monophyletic genera. Red clusters represent groups with problems to discriminate species. Names with green asterisk indicate non-monophyletic species. Bootstrap values above 60 (1,000 replicates) are given at the nodes.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons-attribution
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4524277&req=5

Figure 3: Maximum likelihood tree of the barcoding sequences of mosquito species listed for the Neotropics. Terminal branches have been collapsed in order to save space (see original tree in Suppl. material 7 and 8). Branches in colors indicate non-monophyletic genera. Red clusters represent groups with problems to discriminate species. Names with green asterisk indicate non-monophyletic species. Bootstrap values above 60 (1,000 replicates) are given at the nodes.
Mentions: The likelihood score for the best ML tree was –31,760.30891. The overall topologies of the ML (Fig. 3) and NJ trees compared favorably with exception of Coquillettidia, Culex, and Stegomyia, which resolved as monophyletic clusters. The ML tree revealed 92 species clusters with high bootstrap (95–99). The bootstrap on the remaining 13 species ranged from 65 to 93. ML analysis also recovered 28 species as non-monophyletic groups.

Bottom Line: We examined the usefulness of DNA barcodes to discriminate mosquito species from the Neotropics by compiling 1,292 sequences from a total of 133 species and using the tree-based methods of neighbor-joining and maximum likelihood.Both methodologies provided similar results by resolving 105 species of mosquitoes separated into distinct clusters.This study shows the importance of combining classic morphological methodologies with molecular tools to accurately identify mosquitoes from Colombia.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn. An der Immenburg 1, 53121 Bonn, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Colombia, one of the world's megadiverse countries, has a highly diverse mosquito fauna and a high prevalence of mosquito-borne diseases. In order to provide relevant information about the diversity and taxonomy of mosquito species in Colombia and to test the usefulness of DNA barcodes, mosquito species collected at different elevations in the departments of Antioquia and Caldas were identified combining adult morphology and barcode sequences. A total of 22 mosquito species from eight genera were identified using these combined techniques. We generated 77 barcode sequences with 16 species submitted as new country records for public databases. We examined the usefulness of DNA barcodes to discriminate mosquito species from the Neotropics by compiling 1,292 sequences from a total of 133 species and using the tree-based methods of neighbor-joining and maximum likelihood. Both methodologies provided similar results by resolving 105 species of mosquitoes separated into distinct clusters. This study shows the importance of combining classic morphological methodologies with molecular tools to accurately identify mosquitoes from Colombia.

No MeSH data available.