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The Epidemiological Scale of Alzheimer's Disease.

Cornutiu G - J Clin Med Res (2015)

Bottom Line: The rise in incidence and prevalence with age is known, but interesting to see is that the incidence and prevalence do not rise in a parallel manner with age as simple logic would assume.These numbers raise concerns about the evolution of the disease.Regarding mild cognitive impairment (MCI)/AD ratio, only about 1 in 2 people get AD (raising?) issues about the pathogenic disease relatedness.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Clinic of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy, University of Oradea, 26 Louis Pasteur Street, 410154 Oradea, Bihor, Romania. Email: g_cornutiu@yahoo.com.

ABSTRACT
Alzheimer's disease (AD) has increased from a few cases in a country at the beginning of the 20th century to an incidence of recording a case every 7 seconds in the world. From a rare disease it has reached the top 8 of major health problems in the world. One of the epidemiological problems of AD is the fact that authors from different countries use different reporting units. Some report numbers to 100,000 inhabitants, others to 1,000 inhabitants and others report the total number of cases in a country. Standardization of these reports is strictly necessary. The rise in incidence and prevalence with age is known, but interesting to see is that the incidence and prevalence do not rise in a parallel manner with age as simple logic would assume. Between the ages of 60 and 90, the incidence in men increases two times and in women 41 times, prevalence increase in men is 55.25-fold and in women 77-fold. Regarding the women/men ratio, the incidence is 20.5-fold increased, and prevalence is merely 1.3936-fold increased. These numbers raise concerns about the evolution of the disease. Regarding mild cognitive impairment (MCI)/AD ratio, only about 1 in 2 people get AD (raising?) issues about the pathogenic disease relatedness.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The variation of AD incidence in age groups during two periods of time [28].
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Figure 1: The variation of AD incidence in age groups during two periods of time [28].

Mentions: In this study regarding the prevalence on two time segments and on age groups (Fig. 1), we notice that the first period 1980 - 1994, the ratio of the prevalence at the age of 80 and at the age of 50 - 59 is of 18.54 and for the period 1994 - 2006 the same ratio is of 19.85. In both cases, the curve rises sharply after the age of 60 but amplitude of the growing prevalence is not time consistent. The relation of AD prevalence with the age groups is unanimously accepted [29]. There is a classical appreciation made by Doodys [30] according to which in USA, AD had a prevalence of 12% for > 65 years old, 23% for > 75 years old and 47% for > 85 years old in 2010. Even if these numbers cannot be found in other geographical areas and in another time segment, they have big suggestive and guiding power, without taking away too much of the rigor science imposes, but which is at the same time dynamic. In fact, the static numbers pointed out, from the temporal point of view, they give the estimation of a moment, the phenomenon is best described by evolution curves, and it is the ratio between photography and film.


The Epidemiological Scale of Alzheimer's Disease.

Cornutiu G - J Clin Med Res (2015)

The variation of AD incidence in age groups during two periods of time [28].
© Copyright Policy - open access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4522981&req=5

Figure 1: The variation of AD incidence in age groups during two periods of time [28].
Mentions: In this study regarding the prevalence on two time segments and on age groups (Fig. 1), we notice that the first period 1980 - 1994, the ratio of the prevalence at the age of 80 and at the age of 50 - 59 is of 18.54 and for the period 1994 - 2006 the same ratio is of 19.85. In both cases, the curve rises sharply after the age of 60 but amplitude of the growing prevalence is not time consistent. The relation of AD prevalence with the age groups is unanimously accepted [29]. There is a classical appreciation made by Doodys [30] according to which in USA, AD had a prevalence of 12% for > 65 years old, 23% for > 75 years old and 47% for > 85 years old in 2010. Even if these numbers cannot be found in other geographical areas and in another time segment, they have big suggestive and guiding power, without taking away too much of the rigor science imposes, but which is at the same time dynamic. In fact, the static numbers pointed out, from the temporal point of view, they give the estimation of a moment, the phenomenon is best described by evolution curves, and it is the ratio between photography and film.

Bottom Line: The rise in incidence and prevalence with age is known, but interesting to see is that the incidence and prevalence do not rise in a parallel manner with age as simple logic would assume.These numbers raise concerns about the evolution of the disease.Regarding mild cognitive impairment (MCI)/AD ratio, only about 1 in 2 people get AD (raising?) issues about the pathogenic disease relatedness.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Clinic of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy, University of Oradea, 26 Louis Pasteur Street, 410154 Oradea, Bihor, Romania. Email: g_cornutiu@yahoo.com.

ABSTRACT
Alzheimer's disease (AD) has increased from a few cases in a country at the beginning of the 20th century to an incidence of recording a case every 7 seconds in the world. From a rare disease it has reached the top 8 of major health problems in the world. One of the epidemiological problems of AD is the fact that authors from different countries use different reporting units. Some report numbers to 100,000 inhabitants, others to 1,000 inhabitants and others report the total number of cases in a country. Standardization of these reports is strictly necessary. The rise in incidence and prevalence with age is known, but interesting to see is that the incidence and prevalence do not rise in a parallel manner with age as simple logic would assume. Between the ages of 60 and 90, the incidence in men increases two times and in women 41 times, prevalence increase in men is 55.25-fold and in women 77-fold. Regarding the women/men ratio, the incidence is 20.5-fold increased, and prevalence is merely 1.3936-fold increased. These numbers raise concerns about the evolution of the disease. Regarding mild cognitive impairment (MCI)/AD ratio, only about 1 in 2 people get AD (raising?) issues about the pathogenic disease relatedness.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus