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Impact of cancer and chemotherapy on autonomic nervous system function and cardiovascular reactivity in young adults with cancer: a case-controlled feasibility study.

Adams SC, Schondorf R, Benoit J, Kilgour RD - BMC Cancer (2015)

Bottom Line: Their results were compared to 12 sex- and age-matched controls.Our feasibility criteria addressed: i) recruitment potential, ii) retention rates, iii) pre-chemotherapy assessment potential, iv) test performance/tolerability, and v) identification and minimizing the influence of potentially confounding medication.According to the CASS, there was evidence of ANS impairment at baseline in 30.8 % of patients, which persisted in 18.2 % of patients at follow-up, compared to 0 % of controls at baseline or follow-up.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Exercise Science, Concordia University, Montreal, QC, Canada. scott.adams@ualberta.ca.

ABSTRACT

Background: Preliminary evidence suggests cancer- and chemotherapy-related autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunction may contribute to the increased cardiovascular (CV) morbidity- and mortality-risks in cancer survivors. However, the reliability of these findings may have been jeopardized by inconsistent participant screening and assessment methods. Therefore, good laboratory practices must be established before the presence and nature of cancer-related autonomic dysfunction can be characterized. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of conducting concurrent ANS and cardiovascular evaluations in young adult cancer patients, according to the following criteria: i) identifying methodological pitfalls and proposing good laboratory practice criteria for ANS testing in cancer, and ii) providing initial physiologic evidence of autonomic perturbations in cancer patients using the composite autonomic scoring scale (CASS).

Methods: Thirteen patients (mixed diagnoses) were assessed immediately before and after 4 cycles of chemotherapy. Their results were compared to 12 sex- and age-matched controls. ANS function was assessed using standardized tests of resting CV (tilt-table, respiratory sinus arrhythmia and Valsalva maneuver) and sudomotor (quantitative sudomotor axon reflex test) reactivity. Cardiovascular reactivity during exercise was assessed using a modified Astrand-Ryhming cycle ergometer protocol. Our feasibility criteria addressed: i) recruitment potential, ii) retention rates, iii) pre-chemotherapy assessment potential, iv) test performance/tolerability, and v) identification and minimizing the influence of potentially confounding medication. T-tests and repeated measures ANOVAs were used to assess between- and within-group differences at baseline and follow-up.

Results: The overall success rate in achieving our feasibility criteria was 98.4 %. According to the CASS, there was evidence of ANS impairment at baseline in 30.8 % of patients, which persisted in 18.2 % of patients at follow-up, compared to 0 % of controls at baseline or follow-up.

Conclusions: Results from our feasibility assessment suggest that the investigation of ANS function in young adult cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy is possible. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to report CASS-based evidence of ANS impairment and sudomotor dysfunction in any cancer population. Moreover, we provide evidence of cancer- and chemotherapy-related parasympathetic dysfunction - as a possible contributor to the pathogenesis of CV disease in cancer survivors.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Subject recruitment and testing
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Fig2: Subject recruitment and testing

Mentions: Thirteen cancer patients and 12 sex-and age-matched controls were tested at T1 (Fig. 2). Subject demographic and medical information is presented in Tables 2, 3 and 4. Study groups were closely matched in gender, age and body mass index. There was a significant difference at T1, t(21) = 2.594, p = 0.017, in weekly physical activity levels (mean ± SD) between the patient (7.5 ± 7.6 MET∙hrs∙week−1) and control groups (26.3 ± 22.9 MET∙hrs∙week−1), respectively. There was also a trend towards significance in T1, t(21) = 2.066, p = 0.051, in Brief Fatigue Inventory scores (mean ± SD; out of a possible 100 a.u.) between the patient (27.3 ± 14.2 a.u.) and control groups (15.5 ± 13.2 a.u.), respectively.Fig. 2


Impact of cancer and chemotherapy on autonomic nervous system function and cardiovascular reactivity in young adults with cancer: a case-controlled feasibility study.

Adams SC, Schondorf R, Benoit J, Kilgour RD - BMC Cancer (2015)

Subject recruitment and testing
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4522971&req=5

Fig2: Subject recruitment and testing
Mentions: Thirteen cancer patients and 12 sex-and age-matched controls were tested at T1 (Fig. 2). Subject demographic and medical information is presented in Tables 2, 3 and 4. Study groups were closely matched in gender, age and body mass index. There was a significant difference at T1, t(21) = 2.594, p = 0.017, in weekly physical activity levels (mean ± SD) between the patient (7.5 ± 7.6 MET∙hrs∙week−1) and control groups (26.3 ± 22.9 MET∙hrs∙week−1), respectively. There was also a trend towards significance in T1, t(21) = 2.066, p = 0.051, in Brief Fatigue Inventory scores (mean ± SD; out of a possible 100 a.u.) between the patient (27.3 ± 14.2 a.u.) and control groups (15.5 ± 13.2 a.u.), respectively.Fig. 2

Bottom Line: Their results were compared to 12 sex- and age-matched controls.Our feasibility criteria addressed: i) recruitment potential, ii) retention rates, iii) pre-chemotherapy assessment potential, iv) test performance/tolerability, and v) identification and minimizing the influence of potentially confounding medication.According to the CASS, there was evidence of ANS impairment at baseline in 30.8 % of patients, which persisted in 18.2 % of patients at follow-up, compared to 0 % of controls at baseline or follow-up.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Exercise Science, Concordia University, Montreal, QC, Canada. scott.adams@ualberta.ca.

ABSTRACT

Background: Preliminary evidence suggests cancer- and chemotherapy-related autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunction may contribute to the increased cardiovascular (CV) morbidity- and mortality-risks in cancer survivors. However, the reliability of these findings may have been jeopardized by inconsistent participant screening and assessment methods. Therefore, good laboratory practices must be established before the presence and nature of cancer-related autonomic dysfunction can be characterized. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of conducting concurrent ANS and cardiovascular evaluations in young adult cancer patients, according to the following criteria: i) identifying methodological pitfalls and proposing good laboratory practice criteria for ANS testing in cancer, and ii) providing initial physiologic evidence of autonomic perturbations in cancer patients using the composite autonomic scoring scale (CASS).

Methods: Thirteen patients (mixed diagnoses) were assessed immediately before and after 4 cycles of chemotherapy. Their results were compared to 12 sex- and age-matched controls. ANS function was assessed using standardized tests of resting CV (tilt-table, respiratory sinus arrhythmia and Valsalva maneuver) and sudomotor (quantitative sudomotor axon reflex test) reactivity. Cardiovascular reactivity during exercise was assessed using a modified Astrand-Ryhming cycle ergometer protocol. Our feasibility criteria addressed: i) recruitment potential, ii) retention rates, iii) pre-chemotherapy assessment potential, iv) test performance/tolerability, and v) identification and minimizing the influence of potentially confounding medication. T-tests and repeated measures ANOVAs were used to assess between- and within-group differences at baseline and follow-up.

Results: The overall success rate in achieving our feasibility criteria was 98.4 %. According to the CASS, there was evidence of ANS impairment at baseline in 30.8 % of patients, which persisted in 18.2 % of patients at follow-up, compared to 0 % of controls at baseline or follow-up.

Conclusions: Results from our feasibility assessment suggest that the investigation of ANS function in young adult cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy is possible. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to report CASS-based evidence of ANS impairment and sudomotor dysfunction in any cancer population. Moreover, we provide evidence of cancer- and chemotherapy-related parasympathetic dysfunction - as a possible contributor to the pathogenesis of CV disease in cancer survivors.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus