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Giant Solitary Anterior Cervical Canal Neurofibroma: Case Report and Surgical Technique.

Idowu OE, Atobatele KM, Soyemi SO - Asian Spine J (2015)

Bottom Line: When the large lesion is ventrally located to the spinal cord, an anterolateral approach may not be ideal due to various technical challenges.In this report, we describe a case of intradural extramedullary GSACCN located at the cervical region extending from the axis to the sixth cervical vertebrae.Here we also describe a posterior technique successfully used to resect the tumour.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Neurosurgery Division, Department of Surgery, Lagos State University College of Medicine and Lagos State University Teaching Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria.

ABSTRACT
Giant solitary anterior cervical canal neurofibroma (GSACCN) is rarely reported in the literature. When the large lesion is ventrally located to the spinal cord, an anterolateral approach may not be ideal due to various technical challenges. In this report, we describe a case of intradural extramedullary GSACCN located at the cervical region extending from the axis to the sixth cervical vertebrae. Here we also describe a posterior technique successfully used to resect the tumour. Therefore, the posterior approach by En bloc decompressive laminectomy and laminoplasty might be used to adequately treat the lesion.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Preoperative T1-weighted magnetic resonance image of the patient.
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Figure 1: Preoperative T1-weighted magnetic resonance image of the patient.

Mentions: Cervical 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging showed an intradural and extramedullary tumour ventral to the spinal cord extending from the axis to the sixth cervical vertebrae, with the adjoining cord thinned and pushed posteriorly (Fig. 1). Subsequently he had an uneventful total tumour resection. Postoperative period was also uneventful with progressive neurological improvement with neurorehabilitation. Resected specimen histology was consistent with NFs (Fig. 2).


Giant Solitary Anterior Cervical Canal Neurofibroma: Case Report and Surgical Technique.

Idowu OE, Atobatele KM, Soyemi SO - Asian Spine J (2015)

Preoperative T1-weighted magnetic resonance image of the patient.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4522452&req=5

Figure 1: Preoperative T1-weighted magnetic resonance image of the patient.
Mentions: Cervical 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging showed an intradural and extramedullary tumour ventral to the spinal cord extending from the axis to the sixth cervical vertebrae, with the adjoining cord thinned and pushed posteriorly (Fig. 1). Subsequently he had an uneventful total tumour resection. Postoperative period was also uneventful with progressive neurological improvement with neurorehabilitation. Resected specimen histology was consistent with NFs (Fig. 2).

Bottom Line: When the large lesion is ventrally located to the spinal cord, an anterolateral approach may not be ideal due to various technical challenges.In this report, we describe a case of intradural extramedullary GSACCN located at the cervical region extending from the axis to the sixth cervical vertebrae.Here we also describe a posterior technique successfully used to resect the tumour.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Neurosurgery Division, Department of Surgery, Lagos State University College of Medicine and Lagos State University Teaching Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria.

ABSTRACT
Giant solitary anterior cervical canal neurofibroma (GSACCN) is rarely reported in the literature. When the large lesion is ventrally located to the spinal cord, an anterolateral approach may not be ideal due to various technical challenges. In this report, we describe a case of intradural extramedullary GSACCN located at the cervical region extending from the axis to the sixth cervical vertebrae. Here we also describe a posterior technique successfully used to resect the tumour. Therefore, the posterior approach by En bloc decompressive laminectomy and laminoplasty might be used to adequately treat the lesion.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus