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Combined Video-Assisted Thoracic Surgery and Posterior Spinal Surgery for the Treatment of Dumbbell Tumor of the First Thoracic Nerve Root.

Ohya J, Miyoshi K, Kitagawa T, Sato Y, Maehara T, Mikami Y - Asian Spine J (2015)

Bottom Line: Surgeons should be cautious, especially when performing a surgical procedure for a dumbbell tumor of the T1 nerve root because the tumor is anatomically located adjacent to important organs and because the T1 nerve root composes the lower trunk of the brachial plexus with the eighth cervical nerve root.We first performed video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) to release the organs anteriorly and then performed posterior spinal surgery in the prone position.The combined VATS and posterior spinal surgery may become a standard surgical procedure for the treatment of dumbbell tumors of the T1 nerve root.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. ; Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Yokohama Rosai Hospital, Yokohama, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Although several cases of a dumbbell tumor of thoracic nerve roots have been reported, reports on the surgical procedures for a dumbbell tumor of the first thoracic (T1) nerve root are rare. Surgeons should be cautious, especially when performing a surgical procedure for a dumbbell tumor of the T1 nerve root because the tumor is anatomically located adjacent to important organs and because the T1 nerve root composes the lower trunk of the brachial plexus with the eighth cervical nerve root. We present cases with dumbbell tumors of the T1 nerve root that were treated with combined surgical treatment to remove the tumor. We first performed video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) to release the organs anteriorly and then performed posterior spinal surgery in the prone position. The combined VATS and posterior spinal surgery may become a standard surgical procedure for the treatment of dumbbell tumors of the T1 nerve root.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

T2-weighted axial and coronal magnetic resonance image (MRI). (A) Axial MRI at T1-2 level, (B) coronal MRI.
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Figure 1: T2-weighted axial and coronal magnetic resonance image (MRI). (A) Axial MRI at T1-2 level, (B) coronal MRI.

Mentions: An 18-year-old woman presented with a 2 month history of numbness and motor weakness in her left upper extremity. She was referred to Yokohama Rosai Hospital after she was diagnosed with a dumbbell tumor of the thoracic spine. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a dumbbell-shaped, left foraminal and paravertebral tumor at the T1-T2 level (Fig. 1). An imaging study revealed a dumbbell tumor of the left T1 nerve root (Eden type IV). Computed tomography angiography revealed a dumbbell tumor of the left T1 nerve root, which was attached to the left vertebral and subclavian arteries and extended into the thoracic cavity (Fig. 2).


Combined Video-Assisted Thoracic Surgery and Posterior Spinal Surgery for the Treatment of Dumbbell Tumor of the First Thoracic Nerve Root.

Ohya J, Miyoshi K, Kitagawa T, Sato Y, Maehara T, Mikami Y - Asian Spine J (2015)

T2-weighted axial and coronal magnetic resonance image (MRI). (A) Axial MRI at T1-2 level, (B) coronal MRI.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4522451&req=5

Figure 1: T2-weighted axial and coronal magnetic resonance image (MRI). (A) Axial MRI at T1-2 level, (B) coronal MRI.
Mentions: An 18-year-old woman presented with a 2 month history of numbness and motor weakness in her left upper extremity. She was referred to Yokohama Rosai Hospital after she was diagnosed with a dumbbell tumor of the thoracic spine. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a dumbbell-shaped, left foraminal and paravertebral tumor at the T1-T2 level (Fig. 1). An imaging study revealed a dumbbell tumor of the left T1 nerve root (Eden type IV). Computed tomography angiography revealed a dumbbell tumor of the left T1 nerve root, which was attached to the left vertebral and subclavian arteries and extended into the thoracic cavity (Fig. 2).

Bottom Line: Surgeons should be cautious, especially when performing a surgical procedure for a dumbbell tumor of the T1 nerve root because the tumor is anatomically located adjacent to important organs and because the T1 nerve root composes the lower trunk of the brachial plexus with the eighth cervical nerve root.We first performed video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) to release the organs anteriorly and then performed posterior spinal surgery in the prone position.The combined VATS and posterior spinal surgery may become a standard surgical procedure for the treatment of dumbbell tumors of the T1 nerve root.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. ; Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Yokohama Rosai Hospital, Yokohama, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Although several cases of a dumbbell tumor of thoracic nerve roots have been reported, reports on the surgical procedures for a dumbbell tumor of the first thoracic (T1) nerve root are rare. Surgeons should be cautious, especially when performing a surgical procedure for a dumbbell tumor of the T1 nerve root because the tumor is anatomically located adjacent to important organs and because the T1 nerve root composes the lower trunk of the brachial plexus with the eighth cervical nerve root. We present cases with dumbbell tumors of the T1 nerve root that were treated with combined surgical treatment to remove the tumor. We first performed video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) to release the organs anteriorly and then performed posterior spinal surgery in the prone position. The combined VATS and posterior spinal surgery may become a standard surgical procedure for the treatment of dumbbell tumors of the T1 nerve root.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus