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Simultaneous Esophageal and Gastric Metastases from Lung Cancer.

Park JY, Hong SW, Lee JY, Kim JH, Kang JW, Lee HW, Im JP - Clin Endosc (2015)

Bottom Line: During the treatment period, dysphagia and melena newly developed.Upper GI endoscopy revealed geographic erosion at the distal esophagus and multiple volcano-shaped ulcers on the stomach body.Endoscopic biopsy was performed for each lesion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
We report of a patient with metastatic adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and stomach from lung cancer. The patient was a 68-year-old man receiving radiotherapy and chemotherapy for stage IV lung cancer, without metastases to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract at the time of the initial diagnosis. During the treatment period, dysphagia and melena newly developed. Upper GI endoscopy revealed geographic erosion at the distal esophagus and multiple volcano-shaped ulcers on the stomach body. Endoscopic biopsy was performed for each lesion. To determine whether the lesions were primary esophageal and gastric cancer masses or metastases from the lung cancer, histopathological testing including immunohistochemical staining was performed, and metastasis from lung cancer was confirmed. The disease progressed despite chemotherapy, and the patient died 5 months after the diagnosis of lung cancer. This is a case report of metastatic adenocarcinoma in the esophagus and stomach, which are very rare sites of spread for lung cancer.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Endoscopic findings showing gastrointestinal metastases. (A) Geographic erosion is observed at the distal esophagus 35 cm from the upper incisors, with epithelial break and mild hemorrhagic change. There is no evidence of active bleeding. (B-D) The stomach shows numerous volcano-shaped sessile masses with central umbilication, which vary in size.
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Figure 1: Endoscopic findings showing gastrointestinal metastases. (A) Geographic erosion is observed at the distal esophagus 35 cm from the upper incisors, with epithelial break and mild hemorrhagic change. There is no evidence of active bleeding. (B-D) The stomach shows numerous volcano-shaped sessile masses with central umbilication, which vary in size.

Mentions: During a regular visit to the outpatient clinic, the patient complained of newly developed melena and dysphagia. To evaluate the GI tract, EGD was performed, and this revealed multiple lesions in the esophagus and stomach. Geographic erosion with epithelial break and mild hemorrhagic change without evidence of active bleeding was discovered at the distal esophagus, 35 cm from the upper incisors. Multiple volcano-shaped sessile masses with umbilication at the central portion were scattered through the entire stomach, from the fundus to the proximal antrum, measuring 0.5 (the smallest) to 5 cm (the largest) (Fig. 1).


Simultaneous Esophageal and Gastric Metastases from Lung Cancer.

Park JY, Hong SW, Lee JY, Kim JH, Kang JW, Lee HW, Im JP - Clin Endosc (2015)

Endoscopic findings showing gastrointestinal metastases. (A) Geographic erosion is observed at the distal esophagus 35 cm from the upper incisors, with epithelial break and mild hemorrhagic change. There is no evidence of active bleeding. (B-D) The stomach shows numerous volcano-shaped sessile masses with central umbilication, which vary in size.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4522427&req=5

Figure 1: Endoscopic findings showing gastrointestinal metastases. (A) Geographic erosion is observed at the distal esophagus 35 cm from the upper incisors, with epithelial break and mild hemorrhagic change. There is no evidence of active bleeding. (B-D) The stomach shows numerous volcano-shaped sessile masses with central umbilication, which vary in size.
Mentions: During a regular visit to the outpatient clinic, the patient complained of newly developed melena and dysphagia. To evaluate the GI tract, EGD was performed, and this revealed multiple lesions in the esophagus and stomach. Geographic erosion with epithelial break and mild hemorrhagic change without evidence of active bleeding was discovered at the distal esophagus, 35 cm from the upper incisors. Multiple volcano-shaped sessile masses with umbilication at the central portion were scattered through the entire stomach, from the fundus to the proximal antrum, measuring 0.5 (the smallest) to 5 cm (the largest) (Fig. 1).

Bottom Line: During the treatment period, dysphagia and melena newly developed.Upper GI endoscopy revealed geographic erosion at the distal esophagus and multiple volcano-shaped ulcers on the stomach body.Endoscopic biopsy was performed for each lesion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
We report of a patient with metastatic adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and stomach from lung cancer. The patient was a 68-year-old man receiving radiotherapy and chemotherapy for stage IV lung cancer, without metastases to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract at the time of the initial diagnosis. During the treatment period, dysphagia and melena newly developed. Upper GI endoscopy revealed geographic erosion at the distal esophagus and multiple volcano-shaped ulcers on the stomach body. Endoscopic biopsy was performed for each lesion. To determine whether the lesions were primary esophageal and gastric cancer masses or metastases from the lung cancer, histopathological testing including immunohistochemical staining was performed, and metastasis from lung cancer was confirmed. The disease progressed despite chemotherapy, and the patient died 5 months after the diagnosis of lung cancer. This is a case report of metastatic adenocarcinoma in the esophagus and stomach, which are very rare sites of spread for lung cancer.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus