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Improving the Endoscopic Detection Rate in Patients with Early Gastric Cancer.

Moon HS - Clin Endosc (2015)

Bottom Line: Endoscopists should ideally possess both sufficient knowledge of the endoscopic gastrointestinal disease findings and an appropriate attitude.Before performing endoscopy, the endoscopist must identify several risk factors of gastric cancer, including the patient's age, comorbidities, and drug history, a family history of gastric cancer, previous endoscopic findings of atrophic gastritis or intestinal metaplasia, and a history of previous endoscopic treatments.During endoscopic examination, the macroscopic appearance is very important for the diagnosis of early gastric cancer; therefore, the endoscopist should have a consistent and organized endoscope processing technique and the ability to comprehensively investigate the entire stomach, even blind spots.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Chungnam National University School of Medicine, Daejeon, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Endoscopists should ideally possess both sufficient knowledge of the endoscopic gastrointestinal disease findings and an appropriate attitude. Before performing endoscopy, the endoscopist must identify several risk factors of gastric cancer, including the patient's age, comorbidities, and drug history, a family history of gastric cancer, previous endoscopic findings of atrophic gastritis or intestinal metaplasia, and a history of previous endoscopic treatments. During endoscopic examination, the macroscopic appearance is very important for the diagnosis of early gastric cancer; therefore, the endoscopist should have a consistent and organized endoscope processing technique and the ability to comprehensively investigate the entire stomach, even blind spots.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Endoscopic findings of various early gastric cancer (EGC) lesions in the blind spot areas. (A) A flat erythematous lesion (EGC 0-IIb) at the cardia. (B) An irregular flat lesion (EGC 0-IIb) in the posterior wall of the upper body. (C) A disrupted mucosal fold (EGC 0-IIc) in the greater curvature of the upper body. (D) A discolored flat lesion (EGC 0-IIb) in the posterior wall of the lower body. (E) A reddish flat lesion (EGC 0-IIb) in the P-ring. (F) A well-demarcated depressed lesion (EGC 0-IIc) in the lesser curvature of the antrum.
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Figure 1: Endoscopic findings of various early gastric cancer (EGC) lesions in the blind spot areas. (A) A flat erythematous lesion (EGC 0-IIb) at the cardia. (B) An irregular flat lesion (EGC 0-IIb) in the posterior wall of the upper body. (C) A disrupted mucosal fold (EGC 0-IIc) in the greater curvature of the upper body. (D) A discolored flat lesion (EGC 0-IIb) in the posterior wall of the lower body. (E) A reddish flat lesion (EGC 0-IIb) in the P-ring. (F) A well-demarcated depressed lesion (EGC 0-IIc) in the lesser curvature of the antrum.

Mentions: A recent analysis of the endoscopic miss rate of 103 patients with EGC and high-grade dysplasia revealed that the miss rate of lesions in the esophagogastric junction area was statistically high (p=0.022), while lesions in the upper gastric area were relatively more frequently missed than those in the lower gastric and antral areas.11 It is well known that the blind spots of upper gastric endoscopy are the cardia, greater curvature of the upper part, posterior area of the body, pyloric area, and lesser curvature of the antrum (Fig. 1).


Improving the Endoscopic Detection Rate in Patients with Early Gastric Cancer.

Moon HS - Clin Endosc (2015)

Endoscopic findings of various early gastric cancer (EGC) lesions in the blind spot areas. (A) A flat erythematous lesion (EGC 0-IIb) at the cardia. (B) An irregular flat lesion (EGC 0-IIb) in the posterior wall of the upper body. (C) A disrupted mucosal fold (EGC 0-IIc) in the greater curvature of the upper body. (D) A discolored flat lesion (EGC 0-IIb) in the posterior wall of the lower body. (E) A reddish flat lesion (EGC 0-IIb) in the P-ring. (F) A well-demarcated depressed lesion (EGC 0-IIc) in the lesser curvature of the antrum.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4522419&req=5

Figure 1: Endoscopic findings of various early gastric cancer (EGC) lesions in the blind spot areas. (A) A flat erythematous lesion (EGC 0-IIb) at the cardia. (B) An irregular flat lesion (EGC 0-IIb) in the posterior wall of the upper body. (C) A disrupted mucosal fold (EGC 0-IIc) in the greater curvature of the upper body. (D) A discolored flat lesion (EGC 0-IIb) in the posterior wall of the lower body. (E) A reddish flat lesion (EGC 0-IIb) in the P-ring. (F) A well-demarcated depressed lesion (EGC 0-IIc) in the lesser curvature of the antrum.
Mentions: A recent analysis of the endoscopic miss rate of 103 patients with EGC and high-grade dysplasia revealed that the miss rate of lesions in the esophagogastric junction area was statistically high (p=0.022), while lesions in the upper gastric area were relatively more frequently missed than those in the lower gastric and antral areas.11 It is well known that the blind spots of upper gastric endoscopy are the cardia, greater curvature of the upper part, posterior area of the body, pyloric area, and lesser curvature of the antrum (Fig. 1).

Bottom Line: Endoscopists should ideally possess both sufficient knowledge of the endoscopic gastrointestinal disease findings and an appropriate attitude.Before performing endoscopy, the endoscopist must identify several risk factors of gastric cancer, including the patient's age, comorbidities, and drug history, a family history of gastric cancer, previous endoscopic findings of atrophic gastritis or intestinal metaplasia, and a history of previous endoscopic treatments.During endoscopic examination, the macroscopic appearance is very important for the diagnosis of early gastric cancer; therefore, the endoscopist should have a consistent and organized endoscope processing technique and the ability to comprehensively investigate the entire stomach, even blind spots.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Chungnam National University School of Medicine, Daejeon, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Endoscopists should ideally possess both sufficient knowledge of the endoscopic gastrointestinal disease findings and an appropriate attitude. Before performing endoscopy, the endoscopist must identify several risk factors of gastric cancer, including the patient's age, comorbidities, and drug history, a family history of gastric cancer, previous endoscopic findings of atrophic gastritis or intestinal metaplasia, and a history of previous endoscopic treatments. During endoscopic examination, the macroscopic appearance is very important for the diagnosis of early gastric cancer; therefore, the endoscopist should have a consistent and organized endoscope processing technique and the ability to comprehensively investigate the entire stomach, even blind spots.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus