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Introduction to Starting Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy: Proper Insertion, Complete Observation, and Appropriate Photographing.

Park KS - Clin Endosc (2015)

Bottom Line: Mastering the basics of endoscopy is very important because when this process is imprecise or performed incorrectly, it can severely affect a patient's health or life.Although there are several guidelines and studies that consider these basics, there are still no standard recommendations for endoscopy in Korea.In this review, basic points, including proper endoscope insertion, precise observation without blind spots, and appropriate photographing, for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy will be discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Diagnostic upper gastrointestinal endoscopy is the most basic of endoscopy procedures and is the technique that trainee doctors first learn. Mastering the basics of endoscopy is very important because when this process is imprecise or performed incorrectly, it can severely affect a patient's health or life. Although there are several guidelines and studies that consider these basics, there are still no standard recommendations for endoscopy in Korea. In this review, basic points, including proper endoscope insertion, precise observation without blind spots, and appropriate photographing, for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy will be discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Grips in the endoscopic procedure. (A) Two-finger method, in which the ring and little fingers hold the endoscope and the index and middle fingers operate the suction and aspiration valves. (B) Three-finger method, in which the middle, ring, and little fingers hold the endoscope and only the index finger is used for the suction and aspiration valves. Adapted from Lee,13 with permission from EndoTODAY.
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Figure 1: Grips in the endoscopic procedure. (A) Two-finger method, in which the ring and little fingers hold the endoscope and the index and middle fingers operate the suction and aspiration valves. (B) Three-finger method, in which the middle, ring, and little fingers hold the endoscope and only the index finger is used for the suction and aspiration valves. Adapted from Lee,13 with permission from EndoTODAY.

Mentions: One of the most difficult things for inexperienced endoscopists is endoscope insertion. Although several endoscopy-related texts are available, few give detailed guidance on insertion methods. One website, although not published literature, is well organized and contains content based on extensive experience and the opinions of several experts, to which I refer here.13 The most important point for proper insertion is for the operator to have a stable posture. Although the method of gripping the endoscope is not thought to directly affect procedural results, long-term continued use of a grip that is not suited to the operator can cause problems in the finger joints and prevent a stable examination. Commonly used endoscope grips include the two-finger method, in which the ring and little fingers hold the endoscope and the index and middle fingers operate the suction and aspiration valves, or the three-finger method, in which the middle, ring, and little fingers hold the endoscope and only the index finger is used for the suction and aspiration valves (Fig. 1). For operators with small hands, because the two-finger method leads to insufficient endoscope stability and can easily cause problems of the wrist and arm, the three-finger method is more appropriate. In the three-finger method, temporary switching to the two-finger method is simple for when the two valves have to be used at the same time.


Introduction to Starting Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy: Proper Insertion, Complete Observation, and Appropriate Photographing.

Park KS - Clin Endosc (2015)

Grips in the endoscopic procedure. (A) Two-finger method, in which the ring and little fingers hold the endoscope and the index and middle fingers operate the suction and aspiration valves. (B) Three-finger method, in which the middle, ring, and little fingers hold the endoscope and only the index finger is used for the suction and aspiration valves. Adapted from Lee,13 with permission from EndoTODAY.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4522417&req=5

Figure 1: Grips in the endoscopic procedure. (A) Two-finger method, in which the ring and little fingers hold the endoscope and the index and middle fingers operate the suction and aspiration valves. (B) Three-finger method, in which the middle, ring, and little fingers hold the endoscope and only the index finger is used for the suction and aspiration valves. Adapted from Lee,13 with permission from EndoTODAY.
Mentions: One of the most difficult things for inexperienced endoscopists is endoscope insertion. Although several endoscopy-related texts are available, few give detailed guidance on insertion methods. One website, although not published literature, is well organized and contains content based on extensive experience and the opinions of several experts, to which I refer here.13 The most important point for proper insertion is for the operator to have a stable posture. Although the method of gripping the endoscope is not thought to directly affect procedural results, long-term continued use of a grip that is not suited to the operator can cause problems in the finger joints and prevent a stable examination. Commonly used endoscope grips include the two-finger method, in which the ring and little fingers hold the endoscope and the index and middle fingers operate the suction and aspiration valves, or the three-finger method, in which the middle, ring, and little fingers hold the endoscope and only the index finger is used for the suction and aspiration valves (Fig. 1). For operators with small hands, because the two-finger method leads to insufficient endoscope stability and can easily cause problems of the wrist and arm, the three-finger method is more appropriate. In the three-finger method, temporary switching to the two-finger method is simple for when the two valves have to be used at the same time.

Bottom Line: Mastering the basics of endoscopy is very important because when this process is imprecise or performed incorrectly, it can severely affect a patient's health or life.Although there are several guidelines and studies that consider these basics, there are still no standard recommendations for endoscopy in Korea.In this review, basic points, including proper endoscope insertion, precise observation without blind spots, and appropriate photographing, for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy will be discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Diagnostic upper gastrointestinal endoscopy is the most basic of endoscopy procedures and is the technique that trainee doctors first learn. Mastering the basics of endoscopy is very important because when this process is imprecise or performed incorrectly, it can severely affect a patient's health or life. Although there are several guidelines and studies that consider these basics, there are still no standard recommendations for endoscopy in Korea. In this review, basic points, including proper endoscope insertion, precise observation without blind spots, and appropriate photographing, for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy will be discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus