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Posterior fossa ependymoblastoma diagnosed in the second month of life: uneventful 12 years survival after gross total resection followed by chemotherapy.

Due-Tønnessen BJ, Egge A, Lundar T, Krossnes B, Stensvold E, Due-Tønnessen P, Brandal P - Springerplus (2015)

Bottom Line: We report on an infant who underwent gross total resection (GTR) of a posterior fossa ependymoblastoma in the second month of life followed by chemotherapy with uneventful long-term survival for 12 years.Postoperative radiotherapy has been considered obligate to have a chance for prolonged survival, but is inadvisable in infants.To our knowledge, this is the first reported long-term survival in an infant treated for ependymoblastoma.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, Oslo University Hospital, Postboks 4950, Nydalen, 0424 Oslo, Norway.

ABSTRACT
We report on an infant who underwent gross total resection (GTR) of a posterior fossa ependymoblastoma in the second month of life followed by chemotherapy with uneventful long-term survival for 12 years. Postoperative radiotherapy has been considered obligate to have a chance for prolonged survival, but is inadvisable in infants. To our knowledge, this is the first reported long-term survival in an infant treated for ependymoblastoma.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A PNET-like tumor with true rosettes is seen in the HE-stained section (a). The true rosettes are positive for vimentin (b) and negative for GFAP (c). The Ki-67 labelling index is about 90% (d).
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Fig3: A PNET-like tumor with true rosettes is seen in the HE-stained section (a). The true rosettes are positive for vimentin (b) and negative for GFAP (c). The Ki-67 labelling index is about 90% (d).

Mentions: The histological examination revealed a malignant small cell tumor with several true multilayered rosettes (Fig. 3a). The rosettes were postitive for vimentin (Fig. 3b), but negative for GFAP (Fig. 3c) and synaptophysin. The tumor was also focally positive for cytokeratin. The Ki-67 labelling index was about 90% in the most cellular areas (Fig. 3d). The tumor was diagnosed as an ependymoblastoma.Fig. 3


Posterior fossa ependymoblastoma diagnosed in the second month of life: uneventful 12 years survival after gross total resection followed by chemotherapy.

Due-Tønnessen BJ, Egge A, Lundar T, Krossnes B, Stensvold E, Due-Tønnessen P, Brandal P - Springerplus (2015)

A PNET-like tumor with true rosettes is seen in the HE-stained section (a). The true rosettes are positive for vimentin (b) and negative for GFAP (c). The Ki-67 labelling index is about 90% (d).
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4522267&req=5

Fig3: A PNET-like tumor with true rosettes is seen in the HE-stained section (a). The true rosettes are positive for vimentin (b) and negative for GFAP (c). The Ki-67 labelling index is about 90% (d).
Mentions: The histological examination revealed a malignant small cell tumor with several true multilayered rosettes (Fig. 3a). The rosettes were postitive for vimentin (Fig. 3b), but negative for GFAP (Fig. 3c) and synaptophysin. The tumor was also focally positive for cytokeratin. The Ki-67 labelling index was about 90% in the most cellular areas (Fig. 3d). The tumor was diagnosed as an ependymoblastoma.Fig. 3

Bottom Line: We report on an infant who underwent gross total resection (GTR) of a posterior fossa ependymoblastoma in the second month of life followed by chemotherapy with uneventful long-term survival for 12 years.Postoperative radiotherapy has been considered obligate to have a chance for prolonged survival, but is inadvisable in infants.To our knowledge, this is the first reported long-term survival in an infant treated for ependymoblastoma.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, Oslo University Hospital, Postboks 4950, Nydalen, 0424 Oslo, Norway.

ABSTRACT
We report on an infant who underwent gross total resection (GTR) of a posterior fossa ependymoblastoma in the second month of life followed by chemotherapy with uneventful long-term survival for 12 years. Postoperative radiotherapy has been considered obligate to have a chance for prolonged survival, but is inadvisable in infants. To our knowledge, this is the first reported long-term survival in an infant treated for ependymoblastoma.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus