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'Nano-impacts': An Electrochemical Technique for Nanoparticle Sizing in Optically Opaque Solutions.

Toh HS, Compton RG - ChemistryOpen (2015)

Bottom Line: Using the 'nano-impacts' method, silver nanoparticles were successfully detected and sized in the model opaque medium.The results obtained compared well with those using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), an ex situ method for nanoparticle size determination.The ability to use the 'nano-impacts' method in media unmeasurable to competitor techniques confers a significant advantage on the electrochemical approach.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Physical & Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Oxford University South Parks Rd, Oxford, OX1 3QZ, UK.

ABSTRACT
Typical laser-dependent methods such as nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) are not able to detect nanoparticles in an optically opaque medium due to scattering or absorption of light. Here, the electrochemical technique of 'nano-impacts' was used to detect nanoparticles in solution in the presence of high levels of alumina particulates causing a milky white suspension. Using the 'nano-impacts' method, silver nanoparticles were successfully detected and sized in the model opaque medium. The results obtained compared well with those using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), an ex situ method for nanoparticle size determination. The ability to use the 'nano-impacts' method in media unmeasurable to competitor techniques confers a significant advantage on the electrochemical approach.

No MeSH data available.


Histogram showing the size distribution of the citrate-capped silver nanoparticles obtained from the chronoamperomogram.
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fig04: Histogram showing the size distribution of the citrate-capped silver nanoparticles obtained from the chronoamperomogram.

Mentions: In total, 498 spikes were recorded from 28 scans. The size distribution is depicted in Figure 4. The average radius of the nanoparticles was calculated to be 13.8±2.2 nm. This is in excellent agreement with the TEM sizing of 14.6±2.1 nm of the same batch of nanoparticles.8 It can be concluded that the nanoparticles sizes are consistent and that ‘nano-impact’ experiments can be performed in opaque medium.


'Nano-impacts': An Electrochemical Technique for Nanoparticle Sizing in Optically Opaque Solutions.

Toh HS, Compton RG - ChemistryOpen (2015)

Histogram showing the size distribution of the citrate-capped silver nanoparticles obtained from the chronoamperomogram.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4522173&req=5

fig04: Histogram showing the size distribution of the citrate-capped silver nanoparticles obtained from the chronoamperomogram.
Mentions: In total, 498 spikes were recorded from 28 scans. The size distribution is depicted in Figure 4. The average radius of the nanoparticles was calculated to be 13.8±2.2 nm. This is in excellent agreement with the TEM sizing of 14.6±2.1 nm of the same batch of nanoparticles.8 It can be concluded that the nanoparticles sizes are consistent and that ‘nano-impact’ experiments can be performed in opaque medium.

Bottom Line: Using the 'nano-impacts' method, silver nanoparticles were successfully detected and sized in the model opaque medium.The results obtained compared well with those using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), an ex situ method for nanoparticle size determination.The ability to use the 'nano-impacts' method in media unmeasurable to competitor techniques confers a significant advantage on the electrochemical approach.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Physical & Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Oxford University South Parks Rd, Oxford, OX1 3QZ, UK.

ABSTRACT
Typical laser-dependent methods such as nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) are not able to detect nanoparticles in an optically opaque medium due to scattering or absorption of light. Here, the electrochemical technique of 'nano-impacts' was used to detect nanoparticles in solution in the presence of high levels of alumina particulates causing a milky white suspension. Using the 'nano-impacts' method, silver nanoparticles were successfully detected and sized in the model opaque medium. The results obtained compared well with those using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), an ex situ method for nanoparticle size determination. The ability to use the 'nano-impacts' method in media unmeasurable to competitor techniques confers a significant advantage on the electrochemical approach.

No MeSH data available.