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Recent Advances in Voltammetry.

Batchelor-McAuley C, Kätelhön E, Barnes EO, Compton RG, Laborda E, Molina A - ChemistryOpen (2015)

Bottom Line: The transformation over the last decade of the level of modelling and simulation of experiments has realised major advances such that electrochemical techniques can be fully developed and applied to real chemical problems of distinct complexity.This review focuses on the topic areas of: multistep electrochemical processes, voltammetry in ionic liquids, the development and interpretation of theories of electron transfer (Butler-Volmer and Marcus-Hush), advances in voltammetric pulse techniques, stochastic random walk models of diffusion, the influence of migration under conditions of low support, voltammetry at rough and porous electrodes, and nanoparticle electrochemistry.The review of the latter field encompasses both the study of nanoparticle-modified electrodes, including stripping voltammetry and the new technique of 'nano-impacts'.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemistry, Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, University of Oxford South Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3QZ, UK.

ABSTRACT
Recent progress in the theory and practice of voltammetry is surveyed and evaluated. The transformation over the last decade of the level of modelling and simulation of experiments has realised major advances such that electrochemical techniques can be fully developed and applied to real chemical problems of distinct complexity. This review focuses on the topic areas of: multistep electrochemical processes, voltammetry in ionic liquids, the development and interpretation of theories of electron transfer (Butler-Volmer and Marcus-Hush), advances in voltammetric pulse techniques, stochastic random walk models of diffusion, the influence of migration under conditions of low support, voltammetry at rough and porous electrodes, and nanoparticle electrochemistry. The review of the latter field encompasses both the study of nanoparticle-modified electrodes, including stripping voltammetry and the new technique of 'nano-impacts'.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic representation of solution potential profiles under conditions of high (solid line) and low (dashed line) support. The dotted lines represent the zone of electron transfer extending from the electrode surface out a certain distance into solution.
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fig16: Schematic representation of solution potential profiles under conditions of high (solid line) and low (dashed line) support. The dotted lines represent the zone of electron transfer extending from the electrode surface out a certain distance into solution.

Mentions: The first reason is to prevent ohmic drop.26 The driving force behind electron transfer is the potential difference between the electrode and the point in solution where electron transfer takes place, . The bulk solution, far from the electrode, has some fixed potential . If the potential drop between and occurs over a distance greater than the electron tunneling distance for electron transfer (outside the zone of electron transfer, ZET) then the full driving force will not be felt; the potential difference is lowered as a result of ohmic drop. If a large amount of excess electrolyte is added to efficiently dissipate excess charge, the distance over which the drop between and occurs is compressed to a distance much smaller than the ZET. This being the case, the electron transfer is then driven by the maximum potential difference, . This is exemplified schematically in Figure 16.


Recent Advances in Voltammetry.

Batchelor-McAuley C, Kätelhön E, Barnes EO, Compton RG, Laborda E, Molina A - ChemistryOpen (2015)

Schematic representation of solution potential profiles under conditions of high (solid line) and low (dashed line) support. The dotted lines represent the zone of electron transfer extending from the electrode surface out a certain distance into solution.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4522172&req=5

fig16: Schematic representation of solution potential profiles under conditions of high (solid line) and low (dashed line) support. The dotted lines represent the zone of electron transfer extending from the electrode surface out a certain distance into solution.
Mentions: The first reason is to prevent ohmic drop.26 The driving force behind electron transfer is the potential difference between the electrode and the point in solution where electron transfer takes place, . The bulk solution, far from the electrode, has some fixed potential . If the potential drop between and occurs over a distance greater than the electron tunneling distance for electron transfer (outside the zone of electron transfer, ZET) then the full driving force will not be felt; the potential difference is lowered as a result of ohmic drop. If a large amount of excess electrolyte is added to efficiently dissipate excess charge, the distance over which the drop between and occurs is compressed to a distance much smaller than the ZET. This being the case, the electron transfer is then driven by the maximum potential difference, . This is exemplified schematically in Figure 16.

Bottom Line: The transformation over the last decade of the level of modelling and simulation of experiments has realised major advances such that electrochemical techniques can be fully developed and applied to real chemical problems of distinct complexity.This review focuses on the topic areas of: multistep electrochemical processes, voltammetry in ionic liquids, the development and interpretation of theories of electron transfer (Butler-Volmer and Marcus-Hush), advances in voltammetric pulse techniques, stochastic random walk models of diffusion, the influence of migration under conditions of low support, voltammetry at rough and porous electrodes, and nanoparticle electrochemistry.The review of the latter field encompasses both the study of nanoparticle-modified electrodes, including stripping voltammetry and the new technique of 'nano-impacts'.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemistry, Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, University of Oxford South Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3QZ, UK.

ABSTRACT
Recent progress in the theory and practice of voltammetry is surveyed and evaluated. The transformation over the last decade of the level of modelling and simulation of experiments has realised major advances such that electrochemical techniques can be fully developed and applied to real chemical problems of distinct complexity. This review focuses on the topic areas of: multistep electrochemical processes, voltammetry in ionic liquids, the development and interpretation of theories of electron transfer (Butler-Volmer and Marcus-Hush), advances in voltammetric pulse techniques, stochastic random walk models of diffusion, the influence of migration under conditions of low support, voltammetry at rough and porous electrodes, and nanoparticle electrochemistry. The review of the latter field encompasses both the study of nanoparticle-modified electrodes, including stripping voltammetry and the new technique of 'nano-impacts'.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus