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The Real Cost of "Cosmetic Tourism" Cost Analysis Study of "Cosmetic Tourism" Complications Presenting to a Public Hospital.

Livingston R, Berlund P, Eccles-Smith J, Sawhney R - Eplasty (2015)

Bottom Line: The overall financial burden of the complication to the hospital was AUD$151 172.52.In the cases presented in this study, it appears that care falls on the patient local hospital and home country to deal with the complications from their surgery abroad.This incurs a financial cost to that hospital in addition to redirecting medical resources that would otherwise be utilized for treating noncosmetic complications, without any remuneration to the local provider.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Queensland, Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery Registrar Gold Coast University Hospital, Queensland, Australia.

ABSTRACT
"Cosmetic Tourism," the process of traveling overseas for cosmetic procedures, is an expanding global phenomenon. The model of care by which these services are delivered can limit perioperative assessment and postoperative follow-up. Our aim was to establish the number and type of complications being treated by a secondary referral hospital resulting from "cosmetic tourism" and the cost that has been incurred by the hospital in a 1-year period. Retrospective cost analysis and chart review of patients admitted to the hospital between the financial year of 2012 and 2013 were performed. Twelve "cosmetic tourism" patients presented to the hospital, requiring admission during the study period. Breast augmentation was the most common procedure and infected prosthesis was the most common complication (n = 4). Complications ranged from infection, pulmonary embolism to penile necrosis. The average cost of treating these patients was $AUD 12 597.71. The overall financial burden of the complication to the hospital was AUD$151 172.52. The "cosmetic tourism" model of care appears to be, in some cases, suboptimal for patients and their regional hospitals. In the cases presented in this study, it appears that care falls on the patient local hospital and home country to deal with the complications from their surgery abroad. This incurs a financial cost to that hospital in addition to redirecting medical resources that would otherwise be utilized for treating noncosmetic complications, without any remuneration to the local provider.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Organisms isolated in infected cases.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Figure 2: Organisms isolated in infected cases.

Mentions: The complications treated were varied, ranging from nipple or penile necrosis to pulmonary embolism (Fig 1). The most common complication was infected implants after breast augmentation (n = 4). The infective organisms found were mainly streptococci and staphylococci species (Fig 2). A fungus was isolated in 1 patient. Multiresistant organisms were not common (n = 1).


The Real Cost of "Cosmetic Tourism" Cost Analysis Study of "Cosmetic Tourism" Complications Presenting to a Public Hospital.

Livingston R, Berlund P, Eccles-Smith J, Sawhney R - Eplasty (2015)

Organisms isolated in infected cases.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4522144&req=5

Figure 2: Organisms isolated in infected cases.
Mentions: The complications treated were varied, ranging from nipple or penile necrosis to pulmonary embolism (Fig 1). The most common complication was infected implants after breast augmentation (n = 4). The infective organisms found were mainly streptococci and staphylococci species (Fig 2). A fungus was isolated in 1 patient. Multiresistant organisms were not common (n = 1).

Bottom Line: The overall financial burden of the complication to the hospital was AUD$151 172.52.In the cases presented in this study, it appears that care falls on the patient local hospital and home country to deal with the complications from their surgery abroad.This incurs a financial cost to that hospital in addition to redirecting medical resources that would otherwise be utilized for treating noncosmetic complications, without any remuneration to the local provider.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Queensland, Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery Registrar Gold Coast University Hospital, Queensland, Australia.

ABSTRACT
"Cosmetic Tourism," the process of traveling overseas for cosmetic procedures, is an expanding global phenomenon. The model of care by which these services are delivered can limit perioperative assessment and postoperative follow-up. Our aim was to establish the number and type of complications being treated by a secondary referral hospital resulting from "cosmetic tourism" and the cost that has been incurred by the hospital in a 1-year period. Retrospective cost analysis and chart review of patients admitted to the hospital between the financial year of 2012 and 2013 were performed. Twelve "cosmetic tourism" patients presented to the hospital, requiring admission during the study period. Breast augmentation was the most common procedure and infected prosthesis was the most common complication (n = 4). Complications ranged from infection, pulmonary embolism to penile necrosis. The average cost of treating these patients was $AUD 12 597.71. The overall financial burden of the complication to the hospital was AUD$151 172.52. The "cosmetic tourism" model of care appears to be, in some cases, suboptimal for patients and their regional hospitals. In the cases presented in this study, it appears that care falls on the patient local hospital and home country to deal with the complications from their surgery abroad. This incurs a financial cost to that hospital in addition to redirecting medical resources that would otherwise be utilized for treating noncosmetic complications, without any remuneration to the local provider.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus