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Magnetic resonance imaging signs of high intraventricular pressure--comparison of findings in dogs with clinically relevant internal hydrocephalus and asymptomatic dogs with ventriculomegaly.

Laubner S, Ondreka N, Failing K, Kramer M, Schmidt MJ - BMC Vet. Res. (2015)

Bottom Line: Discrimination between clinically relevant hydrocephalus and ventriculomegaly based on MRI findings has not been established yet and is anything but trivial because of the wide variation in ventricular size in different dog breeds and individuals.In addition to the ventricle/brain-index, a number of potential subjective signs of increased intraventricular pressure were recorded and compared between the groups.Other MR imaging findings associated with clinically relevant hydrocephalus were an elevation of the corpus callosum (p < 0.01), dorsoventral flattening of the interthalamic adhesion (p < 0.0001), periventricular edema (p < 0.0001), dilation of the olfactory recesses (p < 0.0001), thinning of the cortical sulci (p < 0.0001) and/or the subarachnoid space (p < 0.0027) and disruption of the internal capsule adjacent to the caudate nucleus (p < 0.0001).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Small Animal Clinic, Justus-Liebig-University, Frankfurter Straße 108, Giessen, 35392, Germany. Steffi.Laubner@vetmed.uni-giessen.de.

ABSTRACT

Background: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of canine brains with enlarged ventricles in asymptomatic dogs were compared to those in dogs with clinically relevant internal hydrocephalus, in order to determine the imaging findings indicative of a relevant increase in intraventricular pressure. Discrimination between clinically relevant hydrocephalus and ventriculomegaly based on MRI findings has not been established yet and is anything but trivial because of the wide variation in ventricular size in different dog breeds and individuals. The MRI scans of the brains of 67 dogs of various breeds, skull conformation and weight were reviewed retrospectively. Based on clinical and imaging findings, the dogs were divided into three groups: a normal group (n = 20), a group with clinically silent ventriculomegaly (n = 25) and a group with severe clinically relevant internal hydrocephalus (n = 22). In addition to the ventricle/brain-index, a number of potential subjective signs of increased intraventricular pressure were recorded and compared between the groups.

Results: The ventricle/brain-index was significantly higher in dogs with relevant hydrocephalus (p < 0.001) and a threshold value of 0.6 was specified as a discriminator between internal hydrocephalus and ventriculomegaly. Other MR imaging findings associated with clinically relevant hydrocephalus were an elevation of the corpus callosum (p < 0.01), dorsoventral flattening of the interthalamic adhesion (p < 0.0001), periventricular edema (p < 0.0001), dilation of the olfactory recesses (p < 0.0001), thinning of the cortical sulci (p < 0.0001) and/or the subarachnoid space (p < 0.0027) and disruption of the internal capsule adjacent to the caudate nucleus (p < 0.0001).

Conclusion: A combination of the abovementioned criteria may support a diagnosis of hydrocephalus that requires treatment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Repeatability analysis. Graphical presentation of the comparison of two measurements of the quantitative measurements in Bland-Altman plots. The differences between the two measurements are plotted against the averages of the differences. Ninety five percent of all differences are within two standard deviations representing an excellent repeatability. Outliers are marked with a black rim
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Fig4: Repeatability analysis. Graphical presentation of the comparison of two measurements of the quantitative measurements in Bland-Altman plots. The differences between the two measurements are plotted against the averages of the differences. Ninety five percent of all differences are within two standard deviations representing an excellent repeatability. Outliers are marked with a black rim

Mentions: The assessment of repeatability is shown in Fig. 4. Ninety-five percent of the differences between the first and second measurement are less than ± 2 standard deviations (SD’s) from the mean difference. The Bland-Altmann analysis revealed significant agreement between the raters.Fig. 4


Magnetic resonance imaging signs of high intraventricular pressure--comparison of findings in dogs with clinically relevant internal hydrocephalus and asymptomatic dogs with ventriculomegaly.

Laubner S, Ondreka N, Failing K, Kramer M, Schmidt MJ - BMC Vet. Res. (2015)

Repeatability analysis. Graphical presentation of the comparison of two measurements of the quantitative measurements in Bland-Altman plots. The differences between the two measurements are plotted against the averages of the differences. Ninety five percent of all differences are within two standard deviations representing an excellent repeatability. Outliers are marked with a black rim
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4522113&req=5

Fig4: Repeatability analysis. Graphical presentation of the comparison of two measurements of the quantitative measurements in Bland-Altman plots. The differences between the two measurements are plotted against the averages of the differences. Ninety five percent of all differences are within two standard deviations representing an excellent repeatability. Outliers are marked with a black rim
Mentions: The assessment of repeatability is shown in Fig. 4. Ninety-five percent of the differences between the first and second measurement are less than ± 2 standard deviations (SD’s) from the mean difference. The Bland-Altmann analysis revealed significant agreement between the raters.Fig. 4

Bottom Line: Discrimination between clinically relevant hydrocephalus and ventriculomegaly based on MRI findings has not been established yet and is anything but trivial because of the wide variation in ventricular size in different dog breeds and individuals.In addition to the ventricle/brain-index, a number of potential subjective signs of increased intraventricular pressure were recorded and compared between the groups.Other MR imaging findings associated with clinically relevant hydrocephalus were an elevation of the corpus callosum (p < 0.01), dorsoventral flattening of the interthalamic adhesion (p < 0.0001), periventricular edema (p < 0.0001), dilation of the olfactory recesses (p < 0.0001), thinning of the cortical sulci (p < 0.0001) and/or the subarachnoid space (p < 0.0027) and disruption of the internal capsule adjacent to the caudate nucleus (p < 0.0001).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Small Animal Clinic, Justus-Liebig-University, Frankfurter Straße 108, Giessen, 35392, Germany. Steffi.Laubner@vetmed.uni-giessen.de.

ABSTRACT

Background: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of canine brains with enlarged ventricles in asymptomatic dogs were compared to those in dogs with clinically relevant internal hydrocephalus, in order to determine the imaging findings indicative of a relevant increase in intraventricular pressure. Discrimination between clinically relevant hydrocephalus and ventriculomegaly based on MRI findings has not been established yet and is anything but trivial because of the wide variation in ventricular size in different dog breeds and individuals. The MRI scans of the brains of 67 dogs of various breeds, skull conformation and weight were reviewed retrospectively. Based on clinical and imaging findings, the dogs were divided into three groups: a normal group (n = 20), a group with clinically silent ventriculomegaly (n = 25) and a group with severe clinically relevant internal hydrocephalus (n = 22). In addition to the ventricle/brain-index, a number of potential subjective signs of increased intraventricular pressure were recorded and compared between the groups.

Results: The ventricle/brain-index was significantly higher in dogs with relevant hydrocephalus (p < 0.001) and a threshold value of 0.6 was specified as a discriminator between internal hydrocephalus and ventriculomegaly. Other MR imaging findings associated with clinically relevant hydrocephalus were an elevation of the corpus callosum (p < 0.01), dorsoventral flattening of the interthalamic adhesion (p < 0.0001), periventricular edema (p < 0.0001), dilation of the olfactory recesses (p < 0.0001), thinning of the cortical sulci (p < 0.0001) and/or the subarachnoid space (p < 0.0027) and disruption of the internal capsule adjacent to the caudate nucleus (p < 0.0001).

Conclusion: A combination of the abovementioned criteria may support a diagnosis of hydrocephalus that requires treatment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus