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Rwandan family medicine residents expanding their training into South Africa: the use of South-South medical electives in enhancing learning experiences.

Flinkenflögel M, Ogunbanjo G, Cubaka VK, De Maeseneer J - BMC Med Educ (2015)

Bottom Line: The residents reported important learning outcomes in four overarching domains namely: medical, organisational, educational, and personal.A reciprocity-framework is needed to increase mutual benefits for Southern universities when students from the North come for electives.We suggest further research on the possibility of supporting South-South electives by Northern colleagues.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Discipline Primary Health Care, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Rwanda, Kigali, Rwanda. Maaike.cotc@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: International medical electives are well-accepted in medical education, with the flow of students generally being North-South. In this article we explore the learning outcomes of Rwandan family medicine residents who completed their final year elective in South Africa. We compare the learning outcomes of this South-South elective to those of North-South electives from the literature.

Methods: In-depth interviews were conducted with Rwandan postgraduate family medicine residents who completed a 4-week elective in South Africa during their final year of training. The interviews were thematically analysed in an inductive way.

Results: The residents reported important learning outcomes in four overarching domains namely: medical, organisational, educational, and personal.

Conclusions: The learning outcomes of the residents in this South-South elective had substantial similarities to findings in literature on learning outcomes of students from the North undertaking electives in the Southern hemisphere. Electives are a useful learning tool, both for Northern students, and students from universities in the South. A reciprocity-framework is needed to increase mutual benefits for Southern universities when students from the North come for electives. We suggest further research on the possibility of supporting South-South electives by Northern colleagues.

No MeSH data available.


The North–south-South elective exchange model. The North–south-South elective model as a way to strengthen Southern universities and to give more students from the South the possibility to experience IME
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Fig1: The North–south-South elective exchange model. The North–south-South elective model as a way to strengthen Southern universities and to give more students from the South the possibility to experience IME

Mentions: The development of North–South-South partnerships, where South-South elective programs are supported by the Northern universities who also send their students to the South (Fig. 1) may be another approach to consider. We see the need for further research to explore the practicality of electives within Africa and models like this suggested N-S-S model. We urge Northern institutes to review their vision and actions for reciprocity when sending students to their Southern colleague institutes.Fig. 1


Rwandan family medicine residents expanding their training into South Africa: the use of South-South medical electives in enhancing learning experiences.

Flinkenflögel M, Ogunbanjo G, Cubaka VK, De Maeseneer J - BMC Med Educ (2015)

The North–south-South elective exchange model. The North–south-South elective model as a way to strengthen Southern universities and to give more students from the South the possibility to experience IME
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4522112&req=5

Fig1: The North–south-South elective exchange model. The North–south-South elective model as a way to strengthen Southern universities and to give more students from the South the possibility to experience IME
Mentions: The development of North–South-South partnerships, where South-South elective programs are supported by the Northern universities who also send their students to the South (Fig. 1) may be another approach to consider. We see the need for further research to explore the practicality of electives within Africa and models like this suggested N-S-S model. We urge Northern institutes to review their vision and actions for reciprocity when sending students to their Southern colleague institutes.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: The residents reported important learning outcomes in four overarching domains namely: medical, organisational, educational, and personal.A reciprocity-framework is needed to increase mutual benefits for Southern universities when students from the North come for electives.We suggest further research on the possibility of supporting South-South electives by Northern colleagues.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Discipline Primary Health Care, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Rwanda, Kigali, Rwanda. Maaike.cotc@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: International medical electives are well-accepted in medical education, with the flow of students generally being North-South. In this article we explore the learning outcomes of Rwandan family medicine residents who completed their final year elective in South Africa. We compare the learning outcomes of this South-South elective to those of North-South electives from the literature.

Methods: In-depth interviews were conducted with Rwandan postgraduate family medicine residents who completed a 4-week elective in South Africa during their final year of training. The interviews were thematically analysed in an inductive way.

Results: The residents reported important learning outcomes in four overarching domains namely: medical, organisational, educational, and personal.

Conclusions: The learning outcomes of the residents in this South-South elective had substantial similarities to findings in literature on learning outcomes of students from the North undertaking electives in the Southern hemisphere. Electives are a useful learning tool, both for Northern students, and students from universities in the South. A reciprocity-framework is needed to increase mutual benefits for Southern universities when students from the North come for electives. We suggest further research on the possibility of supporting South-South electives by Northern colleagues.

No MeSH data available.