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Vitamin D deficiency is associated with increased risk of Alzheimer's disease and dementia: evidence from meta-analysis.

Shen L, Ji HF - Nutr J (2015)

Bottom Line: Results of our meta-analysis showed that subjects with deficient vitamin D status (25(OH)D level < 50 nmol/L) were at increased risk of developing AD by 21% compared with those possessing 25(OH)D level > 50 nmol/L.Similar analysis also found a significantly increased dementia risk in vitamin D deficient subjects.There is no evidence for significant heterogeneity among the included studies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Shandong Provincial Research Center for Bioinformatic Engineering and Technique, School of Life Sciences, Shandong University of Technology, Zibo, 255049, P. R. China.

ABSTRACT

Background: In recent years, the associations between vitamin D status and Alzheimer's disease (AD) and dementia have gained increasing interests. The present meta-analysis was designed to estimate the association between vitamin D deficiency and risk of developing AD and dementia.

Methods: A literature search conducted until February 2015 identified 10 study populations, which were included in the meta-analysis. Pooled risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated with a random-effect model using Stata software package.

Results: Results of our meta-analysis showed that subjects with deficient vitamin D status (25(OH)D level < 50 nmol/L) were at increased risk of developing AD by 21% compared with those possessing 25(OH)D level > 50 nmol/L. Similar analysis also found a significantly increased dementia risk in vitamin D deficient subjects. There is no evidence for significant heterogeneity among the included studies.

Conclusion: Available data indicates that lower vitamin D status may be associated with increased risk of developing AD and dementia. More studies are needed to further confirm the associations and to evaluate the beneficial effects of vitamin D supplementation in preventing AD and dementia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flowchart of selection of the references for inclusion in meta-analysis
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Fig1: Flowchart of selection of the references for inclusion in meta-analysis

Mentions: The study selection flowchart was detailed in Fig. 1. Overall, 526 potentially relevant references were initially identified through database search and 298 were obtained for further screen after duplicates removed. Following initial titles and/or abstracts screening 226 references were excluded. After full text assessment of the remained articles five studies, which include 10 study populations, were identified and included in the present analysis [9, 10, 12–14]. For the five eligible studies, two studies are prospective cohort and three are cross-sectional studies. Five eligible studies were conducted in Denmark, USA, UK, France and Germany, respectively. All included studies were published in English. The years of publication ranged from 2010 to 2015.Fig. 1


Vitamin D deficiency is associated with increased risk of Alzheimer's disease and dementia: evidence from meta-analysis.

Shen L, Ji HF - Nutr J (2015)

Flowchart of selection of the references for inclusion in meta-analysis
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4522102&req=5

Fig1: Flowchart of selection of the references for inclusion in meta-analysis
Mentions: The study selection flowchart was detailed in Fig. 1. Overall, 526 potentially relevant references were initially identified through database search and 298 were obtained for further screen after duplicates removed. Following initial titles and/or abstracts screening 226 references were excluded. After full text assessment of the remained articles five studies, which include 10 study populations, were identified and included in the present analysis [9, 10, 12–14]. For the five eligible studies, two studies are prospective cohort and three are cross-sectional studies. Five eligible studies were conducted in Denmark, USA, UK, France and Germany, respectively. All included studies were published in English. The years of publication ranged from 2010 to 2015.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Results of our meta-analysis showed that subjects with deficient vitamin D status (25(OH)D level < 50 nmol/L) were at increased risk of developing AD by 21% compared with those possessing 25(OH)D level > 50 nmol/L.Similar analysis also found a significantly increased dementia risk in vitamin D deficient subjects.There is no evidence for significant heterogeneity among the included studies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Shandong Provincial Research Center for Bioinformatic Engineering and Technique, School of Life Sciences, Shandong University of Technology, Zibo, 255049, P. R. China.

ABSTRACT

Background: In recent years, the associations between vitamin D status and Alzheimer's disease (AD) and dementia have gained increasing interests. The present meta-analysis was designed to estimate the association between vitamin D deficiency and risk of developing AD and dementia.

Methods: A literature search conducted until February 2015 identified 10 study populations, which were included in the meta-analysis. Pooled risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated with a random-effect model using Stata software package.

Results: Results of our meta-analysis showed that subjects with deficient vitamin D status (25(OH)D level < 50 nmol/L) were at increased risk of developing AD by 21% compared with those possessing 25(OH)D level > 50 nmol/L. Similar analysis also found a significantly increased dementia risk in vitamin D deficient subjects. There is no evidence for significant heterogeneity among the included studies.

Conclusion: Available data indicates that lower vitamin D status may be associated with increased risk of developing AD and dementia. More studies are needed to further confirm the associations and to evaluate the beneficial effects of vitamin D supplementation in preventing AD and dementia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus