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Comparison in dietary patterns derived for the Canadian Newfoundland and Labrador population through two time-separated studies.

Chen Z, Wang PP, Shi L, Zhu Y, Liu L, Gao Z, Woodrow J, Roebothan B - Nutr J (2015)

Bottom Line: The objective of this study is to explore and compare major dietary patterns derived for the Canadian subpopulation residing in Newfoundland and Labrador (NL), through two time-separated studies using an identical method.In this study, we derived and compared the major dietary patterns derived from two independent studies in the NL adult population.A comparison between two time-separated studies suggests that dietary patterns of the NL adult population have remained reasonably stable over almost a decade.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Community Health and Humanities, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, NL, A1B 3V6, Canada. zc1476@mun.ca.

ABSTRACT

Background: While a dietary pattern is often believed to be stable in a population, there is limited research assessing its stability over time. The objective of this study is to explore and compare major dietary patterns derived for the Canadian subpopulation residing in Newfoundland and Labrador (NL), through two time-separated studies using an identical method.

Methods: In this study, we derived and compared the major dietary patterns derived from two independent studies in the NL adult population. The first study was based on the healthy controls from a large population-based case-control study (CCS) in 2005. The second was from a food-frequency questionnaire validation project (FFQVP) conducted in 2012. In both studies, participants were recruited in the same manner and dietary information was collected by an identical self-administered food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Exploratory common factor analysis was conducted to identify major dietary patterns. A comparison was conducted between the two study populations.

Results: Four major dietary patterns were identified: Meat, Vegetables/fruits, Fish, and Grains explaining 22%, 20%, 12% and 9% variance respectively, with a total variance of 63%. Three major dietary patterns were derived for the controls of the CCS: Meat, Plant-based diet, and Fish explaining 24%, 20%, and 10% variance respectively, with a total variance of 54%. As the Plant-based diet pattern derived for the CCS was a combination of the Vegetables/fruits and Grains patterns derived for the FFQVP, no considerable difference in dietary patterns was found between the two studies.

Conclusion: A comparison between two time-separated studies suggests that dietary patterns of the NL adult population have remained reasonably stable over almost a decade.

No MeSH data available.


Participant recruitment for FFQVP and CCS
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Fig1: Participant recruitment for FFQVP and CCS

Mentions: Data from FFQs with 20 continuous blanks or reporting energy intakes outside the range of 500–5000 kcal were excluded [18]. After exclusion, a total of 554 participants of the former population and 192 participants of the current population remained and data provided by them were entered into further analysis (Fig. 1).Fig. 1


Comparison in dietary patterns derived for the Canadian Newfoundland and Labrador population through two time-separated studies.

Chen Z, Wang PP, Shi L, Zhu Y, Liu L, Gao Z, Woodrow J, Roebothan B - Nutr J (2015)

Participant recruitment for FFQVP and CCS
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4522097&req=5

Fig1: Participant recruitment for FFQVP and CCS
Mentions: Data from FFQs with 20 continuous blanks or reporting energy intakes outside the range of 500–5000 kcal were excluded [18]. After exclusion, a total of 554 participants of the former population and 192 participants of the current population remained and data provided by them were entered into further analysis (Fig. 1).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: The objective of this study is to explore and compare major dietary patterns derived for the Canadian subpopulation residing in Newfoundland and Labrador (NL), through two time-separated studies using an identical method.In this study, we derived and compared the major dietary patterns derived from two independent studies in the NL adult population.A comparison between two time-separated studies suggests that dietary patterns of the NL adult population have remained reasonably stable over almost a decade.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Community Health and Humanities, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, NL, A1B 3V6, Canada. zc1476@mun.ca.

ABSTRACT

Background: While a dietary pattern is often believed to be stable in a population, there is limited research assessing its stability over time. The objective of this study is to explore and compare major dietary patterns derived for the Canadian subpopulation residing in Newfoundland and Labrador (NL), through two time-separated studies using an identical method.

Methods: In this study, we derived and compared the major dietary patterns derived from two independent studies in the NL adult population. The first study was based on the healthy controls from a large population-based case-control study (CCS) in 2005. The second was from a food-frequency questionnaire validation project (FFQVP) conducted in 2012. In both studies, participants were recruited in the same manner and dietary information was collected by an identical self-administered food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Exploratory common factor analysis was conducted to identify major dietary patterns. A comparison was conducted between the two study populations.

Results: Four major dietary patterns were identified: Meat, Vegetables/fruits, Fish, and Grains explaining 22%, 20%, 12% and 9% variance respectively, with a total variance of 63%. Three major dietary patterns were derived for the controls of the CCS: Meat, Plant-based diet, and Fish explaining 24%, 20%, and 10% variance respectively, with a total variance of 54%. As the Plant-based diet pattern derived for the CCS was a combination of the Vegetables/fruits and Grains patterns derived for the FFQVP, no considerable difference in dietary patterns was found between the two studies.

Conclusion: A comparison between two time-separated studies suggests that dietary patterns of the NL adult population have remained reasonably stable over almost a decade.

No MeSH data available.