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Biomechanical analysis of wrapping of the moderately dilated ascending aorta.

Plonek T, Rylski B, Dumanski A, Siedlaczek P, Kustrzycki W - J Cardiothorac Surg (2015)

Bottom Line: The finite elements analysis showed that the stress exerted on the outer surface of the ascending aorta in the wrapping model (0.05-0.8 MPa) was similar to that observed in the normal aorta (0.03-0.7 MPa) and was lower than in the model of a moderately dilated aorta (0.06-1.4 MPa).The stress on the inner surface of the ascending aorta ranged from 0.2 MPa to 0.4 MPa in the model of the normal aorta, from 0.3 to 1.3 MPa in the model of the dilated aorta and from 0.05 MPa to 0.4 MPa in the wrapping model.The results of this study suggest that the aortic wall is subjected to similar stress following a wrapping procedure to the one present in the normal aorta.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cardiac Surgery, Wroclaw Medical University, Borowska 213, 50-556, Wroclaw, Poland. tomaszplonek@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: External wrapping is a surgical method performed to prevent the dilatation of the aorta and to decrease the risk of its dissection and rupture. However, it is also believed to cause degeneration of the aortic wall. A biomechanical analysis was thus performed to assess the stress of the aortic wall subjected to external wrapping.

Methods: A stress analysis using the finite elements method was carried out on three models: a non-dilated aorta, a moderately dilated aorta and a wrapped aorta. The models were subjected to a pulsatile flow (120/80 mmHg) and a systolic aortic annulus motion of 11 mm.

Results: The finite elements analysis showed that the stress exerted on the outer surface of the ascending aorta in the wrapping model (0.05-0.8 MPa) was similar to that observed in the normal aorta (0.03-0.7 MPa) and was lower than in the model of a moderately dilated aorta (0.06-1.4 MPa). The stress on the inner surface of the ascending aorta ranged from 0.2 MPa to 0.4 MPa in the model of the normal aorta, from 0.3 to 1.3 MPa in the model of the dilated aorta and from 0.05 MPa to 0.4 MPa in the wrapping model.

Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that the aortic wall is subjected to similar stress following a wrapping procedure to the one present in the normal aorta.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Stress distribution on the inner surface of the aorta. a – normal aorta, (b) – aortic aneurysm, (c) – external wrapping
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Fig5: Stress distribution on the inner surface of the aorta. a – normal aorta, (b) – aortic aneurysm, (c) – external wrapping

Mentions: In all the models, the highest values of stress were noticed in the distal part of the ascending aorta, at the junction with the aortic arch. The highest values of stress on the inner surface of the ascending aorta were observed in the aneurysm model (0.3–1.3 MPa). They ranged from 0.2 MPa to 0.4 MPa in the model of the normal aorta and from 0.05 MPa to 0.4 MPa in the aortic wrapping model. The stress values in the aortic wall underneath the vascular prosthesis in the aortic wrapping model were lower than in the model of the normal aorta. There was a 0.1 MPa difference between the stress values around the edges of the vascular prosthesis in the aortic wrapping model (0.2 MPa in the wrapped portion of the aorta vs. 0.3 MPa in the nonwrapped aorta). The graphical presentation of the stress distribution on the inner surface of the ascending aorta in all models is shown in Fig. 5.Fig. 5


Biomechanical analysis of wrapping of the moderately dilated ascending aorta.

Plonek T, Rylski B, Dumanski A, Siedlaczek P, Kustrzycki W - J Cardiothorac Surg (2015)

Stress distribution on the inner surface of the aorta. a – normal aorta, (b) – aortic aneurysm, (c) – external wrapping
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4522071&req=5

Fig5: Stress distribution on the inner surface of the aorta. a – normal aorta, (b) – aortic aneurysm, (c) – external wrapping
Mentions: In all the models, the highest values of stress were noticed in the distal part of the ascending aorta, at the junction with the aortic arch. The highest values of stress on the inner surface of the ascending aorta were observed in the aneurysm model (0.3–1.3 MPa). They ranged from 0.2 MPa to 0.4 MPa in the model of the normal aorta and from 0.05 MPa to 0.4 MPa in the aortic wrapping model. The stress values in the aortic wall underneath the vascular prosthesis in the aortic wrapping model were lower than in the model of the normal aorta. There was a 0.1 MPa difference between the stress values around the edges of the vascular prosthesis in the aortic wrapping model (0.2 MPa in the wrapped portion of the aorta vs. 0.3 MPa in the nonwrapped aorta). The graphical presentation of the stress distribution on the inner surface of the ascending aorta in all models is shown in Fig. 5.Fig. 5

Bottom Line: The finite elements analysis showed that the stress exerted on the outer surface of the ascending aorta in the wrapping model (0.05-0.8 MPa) was similar to that observed in the normal aorta (0.03-0.7 MPa) and was lower than in the model of a moderately dilated aorta (0.06-1.4 MPa).The stress on the inner surface of the ascending aorta ranged from 0.2 MPa to 0.4 MPa in the model of the normal aorta, from 0.3 to 1.3 MPa in the model of the dilated aorta and from 0.05 MPa to 0.4 MPa in the wrapping model.The results of this study suggest that the aortic wall is subjected to similar stress following a wrapping procedure to the one present in the normal aorta.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cardiac Surgery, Wroclaw Medical University, Borowska 213, 50-556, Wroclaw, Poland. tomaszplonek@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: External wrapping is a surgical method performed to prevent the dilatation of the aorta and to decrease the risk of its dissection and rupture. However, it is also believed to cause degeneration of the aortic wall. A biomechanical analysis was thus performed to assess the stress of the aortic wall subjected to external wrapping.

Methods: A stress analysis using the finite elements method was carried out on three models: a non-dilated aorta, a moderately dilated aorta and a wrapped aorta. The models were subjected to a pulsatile flow (120/80 mmHg) and a systolic aortic annulus motion of 11 mm.

Results: The finite elements analysis showed that the stress exerted on the outer surface of the ascending aorta in the wrapping model (0.05-0.8 MPa) was similar to that observed in the normal aorta (0.03-0.7 MPa) and was lower than in the model of a moderately dilated aorta (0.06-1.4 MPa). The stress on the inner surface of the ascending aorta ranged from 0.2 MPa to 0.4 MPa in the model of the normal aorta, from 0.3 to 1.3 MPa in the model of the dilated aorta and from 0.05 MPa to 0.4 MPa in the wrapping model.

Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that the aortic wall is subjected to similar stress following a wrapping procedure to the one present in the normal aorta.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus