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Experience of group conversations in rehabilitation medicine: methodological approach and pilot study.

Perin C, Beghi M, Cerri CG, Peroni F, Viganò B, Cornaggia CM - J Med Person (2015)

Bottom Line: Supportive interventions decreased while elements of sharing progressively increased, leading to progressive increased consciousness of both self and the disease.The group of professionals found that being together allowed them to distinguish performance as the use of their technical skills from understanding the other and his/her experience as part of their own, and not only linked to the disease.The professionals' reflections on their experiences led to the emergence of two possible ways of looking at a patient: as somebody other than me or somebody other like me.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery and Translational Medicine, University of Milano Bicocca, Via Cadore 48, 20052 Monza, Italy ; Cognitive Neurorehabilitation, "Zucchi" Clinical Institute, P.Za Madonnina 1, Carate Brianza, Italy.

ABSTRACT

The restoring of equilibrium after a traumatic event makes it possible to give a new significance to patients' existence, and healthcare professionals simultaneously find themselves very close to questions of pain and disability. For these reasons, we introduced weekly group meetings of healthcare professionals and patients suffering from vascular, traumatic or neurological accidents, and meetings of professionals only at the Neurocognitive Rehabilitation Day Hospital of the University of Milan Bicocca. The aim of this paper is to identify possible indicators of changes in patients' existence through a conversational analysis, describing the experience at the light of methodological approach and reporting the results of a pilot observational study. The patient meetings began in October 2011 and led to a process of greater closeness and trust that was expressed by means of words, gestures, emotional participation, and non-verbal communication. The pilot considers the evolution of indicators in a sample of 14 patients for a period of 9 months and a timeframe of 3 months. Supportive interventions decreased while elements of sharing progressively increased, leading to progressive increased consciousness of both self and the disease. The group of professionals found that being together allowed them to distinguish performance as the use of their technical skills from understanding the other and his/her experience as part of their own, and not only linked to the disease. The professionals' reflections on their experiences led to the emergence of two possible ways of looking at a patient: as somebody other than me or somebody other like me.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Respect of the conversation rules (turns and politeness)
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4522023&req=5

Fig1: Respect of the conversation rules (turns and politeness)

Mentions: In videotape recording every intervention was marked in line with the described above indicators. Tables 2 and 3 and Figs. 1 and 2 report the mean of recorded interventions in four specific phases: baseline, 3-month follow-up, 6-month follow-up and 9-month follow-up.Table 2


Experience of group conversations in rehabilitation medicine: methodological approach and pilot study.

Perin C, Beghi M, Cerri CG, Peroni F, Viganò B, Cornaggia CM - J Med Person (2015)

Respect of the conversation rules (turns and politeness)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4522023&req=5

Fig1: Respect of the conversation rules (turns and politeness)
Mentions: In videotape recording every intervention was marked in line with the described above indicators. Tables 2 and 3 and Figs. 1 and 2 report the mean of recorded interventions in four specific phases: baseline, 3-month follow-up, 6-month follow-up and 9-month follow-up.Table 2

Bottom Line: Supportive interventions decreased while elements of sharing progressively increased, leading to progressive increased consciousness of both self and the disease.The group of professionals found that being together allowed them to distinguish performance as the use of their technical skills from understanding the other and his/her experience as part of their own, and not only linked to the disease.The professionals' reflections on their experiences led to the emergence of two possible ways of looking at a patient: as somebody other than me or somebody other like me.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery and Translational Medicine, University of Milano Bicocca, Via Cadore 48, 20052 Monza, Italy ; Cognitive Neurorehabilitation, "Zucchi" Clinical Institute, P.Za Madonnina 1, Carate Brianza, Italy.

ABSTRACT

The restoring of equilibrium after a traumatic event makes it possible to give a new significance to patients' existence, and healthcare professionals simultaneously find themselves very close to questions of pain and disability. For these reasons, we introduced weekly group meetings of healthcare professionals and patients suffering from vascular, traumatic or neurological accidents, and meetings of professionals only at the Neurocognitive Rehabilitation Day Hospital of the University of Milan Bicocca. The aim of this paper is to identify possible indicators of changes in patients' existence through a conversational analysis, describing the experience at the light of methodological approach and reporting the results of a pilot observational study. The patient meetings began in October 2011 and led to a process of greater closeness and trust that was expressed by means of words, gestures, emotional participation, and non-verbal communication. The pilot considers the evolution of indicators in a sample of 14 patients for a period of 9 months and a timeframe of 3 months. Supportive interventions decreased while elements of sharing progressively increased, leading to progressive increased consciousness of both self and the disease. The group of professionals found that being together allowed them to distinguish performance as the use of their technical skills from understanding the other and his/her experience as part of their own, and not only linked to the disease. The professionals' reflections on their experiences led to the emergence of two possible ways of looking at a patient: as somebody other than me or somebody other like me.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus