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Quantitative Analysis of Adventitious Root Growth Phenotypes in Carnation Stem Cuttings.

Birlanga V, Villanova J, Cano A, Cano EA, Acosta M, Pérez-Pérez JM - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: For some of the new cultivars that are being developed by ornamental breeders, poor adventitious root (AR) formation limits its commercial scaling-up, due to a significant increase in the production costs.We have initiated a genetical-genomics approach to determine the molecular basis of the differences found between carnation cultivars during adventitious rooting.Our study reveals the phenotypic signatures that distinguishes the bad-rooting cultivars and provides the appropriate set-up for the molecular identification of the genes involved in AR development in this species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Instituto de Bioingeniería, Universidad Miguel Hernández, Elche, Spain.

ABSTRACT
Carnation is one of the most important species on the worldwide market of cut flowers. Commercial carnation cultivars are vegetatively propagated from terminal stem cuttings that undergo a rooting and acclimation process. For some of the new cultivars that are being developed by ornamental breeders, poor adventitious root (AR) formation limits its commercial scaling-up, due to a significant increase in the production costs. We have initiated a genetical-genomics approach to determine the molecular basis of the differences found between carnation cultivars during adventitious rooting. The detailed characterization of AR formation in several carnation cultivars differing in their rooting losses has been performed (i) during commercial production at a breeders' rooting station and (ii) on a defined media in a controlled environment. Our study reveals the phenotypic signatures that distinguishes the bad-rooting cultivars and provides the appropriate set-up for the molecular identification of the genes involved in AR development in this species.

No MeSH data available.


Variation in root system architecture among carnation stem cuttings grown in vitro.For each PC, a representative image corresponding to minus or plus two times the standard deviation (−2SD and +2SD) over the mean is shown.
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pone.0133123.g007: Variation in root system architecture among carnation stem cuttings grown in vitro.For each PC, a representative image corresponding to minus or plus two times the standard deviation (−2SD and +2SD) over the mean is shown.

Mentions: To provide some understanding into the observed differences in adventitious rooting between the studied cultivars, we morphometrically characterized root system architectural traits in the base of the stem cuttings of six of these cultivars between 13 and 29 DAP to environmentally-controlled in vitro conditions and without exogenous auxin treatment (see Materials and Methods). For each stem cutting, we gathered quantitative data of 19 previously stablished root system architectural traits [12]. We first reduced the number of studied parameters by partial correlation analysis. Then, iterative PC analysis (see Materials and Methods) allowed us to select for further studies the most relevant parameters, which were related to root network size (RL, RA, RD, RW, ARD and MXR) or root network distribution (RWD, RLD, and RS). Three PCs accounted for 84.7% of the observed variation. PC1 explained 55.3% of the total variance. PC2 and PC3 accounted for 18.1 and 11.3% of the variance, respectively (S4 Table). To visualize the effects of PC1, PC2 and PC3 (S6 Fig) on root architecture, representative images are depicted in Fig 7, where the PC values vary plus or minus two SDs from the mean. PC1 mostly accounted for differences in the size of the root system whereas PC2 and PC3 affected specific attributes of the spatial distribution of the root network.


Quantitative Analysis of Adventitious Root Growth Phenotypes in Carnation Stem Cuttings.

Birlanga V, Villanova J, Cano A, Cano EA, Acosta M, Pérez-Pérez JM - PLoS ONE (2015)

Variation in root system architecture among carnation stem cuttings grown in vitro.For each PC, a representative image corresponding to minus or plus two times the standard deviation (−2SD and +2SD) over the mean is shown.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4521831&req=5

pone.0133123.g007: Variation in root system architecture among carnation stem cuttings grown in vitro.For each PC, a representative image corresponding to minus or plus two times the standard deviation (−2SD and +2SD) over the mean is shown.
Mentions: To provide some understanding into the observed differences in adventitious rooting between the studied cultivars, we morphometrically characterized root system architectural traits in the base of the stem cuttings of six of these cultivars between 13 and 29 DAP to environmentally-controlled in vitro conditions and without exogenous auxin treatment (see Materials and Methods). For each stem cutting, we gathered quantitative data of 19 previously stablished root system architectural traits [12]. We first reduced the number of studied parameters by partial correlation analysis. Then, iterative PC analysis (see Materials and Methods) allowed us to select for further studies the most relevant parameters, which were related to root network size (RL, RA, RD, RW, ARD and MXR) or root network distribution (RWD, RLD, and RS). Three PCs accounted for 84.7% of the observed variation. PC1 explained 55.3% of the total variance. PC2 and PC3 accounted for 18.1 and 11.3% of the variance, respectively (S4 Table). To visualize the effects of PC1, PC2 and PC3 (S6 Fig) on root architecture, representative images are depicted in Fig 7, where the PC values vary plus or minus two SDs from the mean. PC1 mostly accounted for differences in the size of the root system whereas PC2 and PC3 affected specific attributes of the spatial distribution of the root network.

Bottom Line: For some of the new cultivars that are being developed by ornamental breeders, poor adventitious root (AR) formation limits its commercial scaling-up, due to a significant increase in the production costs.We have initiated a genetical-genomics approach to determine the molecular basis of the differences found between carnation cultivars during adventitious rooting.Our study reveals the phenotypic signatures that distinguishes the bad-rooting cultivars and provides the appropriate set-up for the molecular identification of the genes involved in AR development in this species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Instituto de Bioingeniería, Universidad Miguel Hernández, Elche, Spain.

ABSTRACT
Carnation is one of the most important species on the worldwide market of cut flowers. Commercial carnation cultivars are vegetatively propagated from terminal stem cuttings that undergo a rooting and acclimation process. For some of the new cultivars that are being developed by ornamental breeders, poor adventitious root (AR) formation limits its commercial scaling-up, due to a significant increase in the production costs. We have initiated a genetical-genomics approach to determine the molecular basis of the differences found between carnation cultivars during adventitious rooting. The detailed characterization of AR formation in several carnation cultivars differing in their rooting losses has been performed (i) during commercial production at a breeders' rooting station and (ii) on a defined media in a controlled environment. Our study reveals the phenotypic signatures that distinguishes the bad-rooting cultivars and provides the appropriate set-up for the molecular identification of the genes involved in AR development in this species.

No MeSH data available.