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Cognitive Fatigue Destabilizes Economic Decision Making Preferences and Strategies.

Mullette-Gillman OA, Leong RL, Kurnianingsih YA - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: It is common for individuals to engage in taxing cognitive activity for prolonged periods of time, resulting in cognitive fatigue that has the potential to produce significant effects in behaviour and decision making.We separately examined these metrics for alterations within both the gains and losses domains, through the two choice tasks.These results indicate that cognitive fatigue destabilizes economic decision making, resulting in inconsistent preferences and informational strategies that may significantly reduce decision quality.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore; Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience, Neuroscience and Behavioral Disorders Program, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, Singapore, Singapore; SINAPSE Institute for Cognitive Science and Neurotechnologies, Singapore, Singapore.

ABSTRACT

Objective: It is common for individuals to engage in taxing cognitive activity for prolonged periods of time, resulting in cognitive fatigue that has the potential to produce significant effects in behaviour and decision making. We sought to examine whether cognitive fatigue modulates economic decision making.

Methods: We employed a between-subject manipulation design, inducing fatigue through 60 to 90 minutes of taxing cognitive engagement against a control group that watched relaxing videos for a matched period of time. Both before and after the manipulation, participants engaged in two economic decision making tasks (one for gains and one for losses). The analyses focused on two areas of economic decision making--preferences and choice strategies. Uncertainty preferences (risk and ambiguity) were quantified as premium values, defined as the degree and direction in which participants alter the valuation of the gamble in comparison to the certain option. The strategies that each participant engaged in were quantified through a choice strategy metric, which contrasts the degree to which choice behaviour relies upon available satisficing or maximizing information. We separately examined these metrics for alterations within both the gains and losses domains, through the two choice tasks.

Results: The fatigue manipulation resulted in significantly greater levels of reported subjective fatigue, with correspondingly higher levels of reported effort during the cognitively taxing activity. Cognitive fatigue did not alter uncertainty preferences (risk or ambiguity) or informational strategies, in either the gains or losses domains. Rather, cognitive fatigue resulted in greater test-retest variability across most of our economic measures. These results indicate that cognitive fatigue destabilizes economic decision making, resulting in inconsistent preferences and informational strategies that may significantly reduce decision quality.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Choice strategies in the gains and losses domains.Relationship between pre- and post- manipulation independent r-squared values of (A) strategy, (B) rEV and (C) pWIN on trial-by-trial choice behaviour for both fatigue and control groups.
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pone.0132022.g005: Choice strategies in the gains and losses domains.Relationship between pre- and post- manipulation independent r-squared values of (A) strategy, (B) rEV and (C) pWIN on trial-by-trial choice behaviour for both fatigue and control groups.

Mentions: Post-hoc, we noticed a pattern of reduced test-retest correlations within the fatigue group across the economic decision making measures. To quantify this, we used a Fisher’s r-to-z transformation to compare the pre- and post- correlations between fatigue and control groups for each metric (Table 4 and Fig 5).


Cognitive Fatigue Destabilizes Economic Decision Making Preferences and Strategies.

Mullette-Gillman OA, Leong RL, Kurnianingsih YA - PLoS ONE (2015)

Choice strategies in the gains and losses domains.Relationship between pre- and post- manipulation independent r-squared values of (A) strategy, (B) rEV and (C) pWIN on trial-by-trial choice behaviour for both fatigue and control groups.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4521815&req=5

pone.0132022.g005: Choice strategies in the gains and losses domains.Relationship between pre- and post- manipulation independent r-squared values of (A) strategy, (B) rEV and (C) pWIN on trial-by-trial choice behaviour for both fatigue and control groups.
Mentions: Post-hoc, we noticed a pattern of reduced test-retest correlations within the fatigue group across the economic decision making measures. To quantify this, we used a Fisher’s r-to-z transformation to compare the pre- and post- correlations between fatigue and control groups for each metric (Table 4 and Fig 5).

Bottom Line: It is common for individuals to engage in taxing cognitive activity for prolonged periods of time, resulting in cognitive fatigue that has the potential to produce significant effects in behaviour and decision making.We separately examined these metrics for alterations within both the gains and losses domains, through the two choice tasks.These results indicate that cognitive fatigue destabilizes economic decision making, resulting in inconsistent preferences and informational strategies that may significantly reduce decision quality.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore; Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience, Neuroscience and Behavioral Disorders Program, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, Singapore, Singapore; SINAPSE Institute for Cognitive Science and Neurotechnologies, Singapore, Singapore.

ABSTRACT

Objective: It is common for individuals to engage in taxing cognitive activity for prolonged periods of time, resulting in cognitive fatigue that has the potential to produce significant effects in behaviour and decision making. We sought to examine whether cognitive fatigue modulates economic decision making.

Methods: We employed a between-subject manipulation design, inducing fatigue through 60 to 90 minutes of taxing cognitive engagement against a control group that watched relaxing videos for a matched period of time. Both before and after the manipulation, participants engaged in two economic decision making tasks (one for gains and one for losses). The analyses focused on two areas of economic decision making--preferences and choice strategies. Uncertainty preferences (risk and ambiguity) were quantified as premium values, defined as the degree and direction in which participants alter the valuation of the gamble in comparison to the certain option. The strategies that each participant engaged in were quantified through a choice strategy metric, which contrasts the degree to which choice behaviour relies upon available satisficing or maximizing information. We separately examined these metrics for alterations within both the gains and losses domains, through the two choice tasks.

Results: The fatigue manipulation resulted in significantly greater levels of reported subjective fatigue, with correspondingly higher levels of reported effort during the cognitively taxing activity. Cognitive fatigue did not alter uncertainty preferences (risk or ambiguity) or informational strategies, in either the gains or losses domains. Rather, cognitive fatigue resulted in greater test-retest variability across most of our economic measures. These results indicate that cognitive fatigue destabilizes economic decision making, resulting in inconsistent preferences and informational strategies that may significantly reduce decision quality.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus