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Expertise effects in cutaneous wind perception.

Pluijms JP, Cañal-Bruland R, Bergmann Tiest WM, Mulder FA, Savelsbergh GJ - Atten Percept Psychophys (2015)

Bottom Line: We examined whether expertise effects are present in cutaneous wind perception.Participants were asked to judge cutaneously perceived wind directions and speeds without having access to any visual or auditory information.Expert sailors (n = 6), trained to make the most effective use of wind characteristics, were compared to less-skilled sailors (n = 6) and to a group of nonsailors (n = 6).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: MOVE Research Institute Amsterdam, Faculty of Human Movement Sciences, VU University Amsterdam, Van der Boechorststraat 9, 1081 BT, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, j.p.pluijms@vu.nl.

ABSTRACT
We examined whether expertise effects are present in cutaneous wind perception. To this end, we presented wind stimuli consisting of different wind directions and speeds in a wind simulator. The wind simulator generated wind stimuli from 16 directions and with three speeds by means of eight automotive wind fans. Participants were asked to judge cutaneously perceived wind directions and speeds without having access to any visual or auditory information. Expert sailors (n = 6), trained to make the most effective use of wind characteristics, were compared to less-skilled sailors (n = 6) and to a group of nonsailors (n = 6). The results indicated that expert sailors outperformed nonsailors in perceiving wind direction (i.e., smaller mean signed errors) when presented with low wind speeds. This suggests that expert sailors are more sensitive in picking up differences in wind direction, particularly when confronted with low wind speeds that demand higher sensitivity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Top view of the wind simulator, including the 16 nominal wind directions (steps of 22.5°) and locations of the eight wind fans. The wind simulator was integrated within a sailing simulator. For the sailing simulator, a real boat, called the laser dinghy, was put in the lab. Participants were seated in the laser dinghy exactly in the middle of the octagonal ring (modified from Verlinden et al., 2013)
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Fig2: Top view of the wind simulator, including the 16 nominal wind directions (steps of 22.5°) and locations of the eight wind fans. The wind simulator was integrated within a sailing simulator. For the sailing simulator, a real boat, called the laser dinghy, was put in the lab. Participants were seated in the laser dinghy exactly in the middle of the octagonal ring (modified from Verlinden et al., 2013)

Mentions: Each wind fan had a diameter of 40 cm and could produce a steady airflow rate between 3 and 6 knots (1.5–3 m/s) in the center of the ring. The fans were positioned at the middle of each side of the octagon and were aimed down at the participant, seated in the center, at an angle of 45 deg. The wind fans were controlled with pulse-width modulation (PWM) using microcontrollers (Arduino) and LabVIEW (National Instruments). In pulse-width modulation, the power supplied to the wind fans is rapidly switched on and off with different ratios of on- and off-times, effectively controlling the fan speed on a continuous scale. The eight wind fans could be activated alone or in pairs (next to each other), which resulted in 16 wind directions. That is, activating each single wind fan generated eight wind directions, and activating two wind fans next to each other, simultaneously and at the same speed, generated eight intermediate wind directions (e.g., activating the N and NE wind fans generated a wind direction of NNE; see Fig. 2).Fig. 2


Expertise effects in cutaneous wind perception.

Pluijms JP, Cañal-Bruland R, Bergmann Tiest WM, Mulder FA, Savelsbergh GJ - Atten Percept Psychophys (2015)

Top view of the wind simulator, including the 16 nominal wind directions (steps of 22.5°) and locations of the eight wind fans. The wind simulator was integrated within a sailing simulator. For the sailing simulator, a real boat, called the laser dinghy, was put in the lab. Participants were seated in the laser dinghy exactly in the middle of the octagonal ring (modified from Verlinden et al., 2013)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4521093&req=5

Fig2: Top view of the wind simulator, including the 16 nominal wind directions (steps of 22.5°) and locations of the eight wind fans. The wind simulator was integrated within a sailing simulator. For the sailing simulator, a real boat, called the laser dinghy, was put in the lab. Participants were seated in the laser dinghy exactly in the middle of the octagonal ring (modified from Verlinden et al., 2013)
Mentions: Each wind fan had a diameter of 40 cm and could produce a steady airflow rate between 3 and 6 knots (1.5–3 m/s) in the center of the ring. The fans were positioned at the middle of each side of the octagon and were aimed down at the participant, seated in the center, at an angle of 45 deg. The wind fans were controlled with pulse-width modulation (PWM) using microcontrollers (Arduino) and LabVIEW (National Instruments). In pulse-width modulation, the power supplied to the wind fans is rapidly switched on and off with different ratios of on- and off-times, effectively controlling the fan speed on a continuous scale. The eight wind fans could be activated alone or in pairs (next to each other), which resulted in 16 wind directions. That is, activating each single wind fan generated eight wind directions, and activating two wind fans next to each other, simultaneously and at the same speed, generated eight intermediate wind directions (e.g., activating the N and NE wind fans generated a wind direction of NNE; see Fig. 2).Fig. 2

Bottom Line: We examined whether expertise effects are present in cutaneous wind perception.Participants were asked to judge cutaneously perceived wind directions and speeds without having access to any visual or auditory information.Expert sailors (n = 6), trained to make the most effective use of wind characteristics, were compared to less-skilled sailors (n = 6) and to a group of nonsailors (n = 6).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: MOVE Research Institute Amsterdam, Faculty of Human Movement Sciences, VU University Amsterdam, Van der Boechorststraat 9, 1081 BT, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, j.p.pluijms@vu.nl.

ABSTRACT
We examined whether expertise effects are present in cutaneous wind perception. To this end, we presented wind stimuli consisting of different wind directions and speeds in a wind simulator. The wind simulator generated wind stimuli from 16 directions and with three speeds by means of eight automotive wind fans. Participants were asked to judge cutaneously perceived wind directions and speeds without having access to any visual or auditory information. Expert sailors (n = 6), trained to make the most effective use of wind characteristics, were compared to less-skilled sailors (n = 6) and to a group of nonsailors (n = 6). The results indicated that expert sailors outperformed nonsailors in perceiving wind direction (i.e., smaller mean signed errors) when presented with low wind speeds. This suggests that expert sailors are more sensitive in picking up differences in wind direction, particularly when confronted with low wind speeds that demand higher sensitivity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus