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Control of a Supernumerary Robotic Hand by Foot: An Experimental Study in Virtual Reality.

Abdi E, Burdet E, Bouri M, Bleuler H - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: In the operational theater, the surgical team could highly benefit from a robotic supplementary hand under the surgeon's full control.Participants' performance improved within a few minutes of practice without any specific difficulty to complete the tasks.These results suggest that a combination of practice and appropriate tasks can enhance the learning process for controlling a robotic hand by foot.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Robotic Systems Laboratory, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne, Switzerland.

ABSTRACT
In the operational theater, the surgical team could highly benefit from a robotic supplementary hand under the surgeon's full control. The surgeon may so become more autonomous; this may reduce communication errors with the assistants and take over difficult tasks such as holding tools without tremor. In this paper, we therefore examine the possibility to control a third robotic hand with one foot's movements. Three experiments in virtual reality were designed to assess the feasibility of this control strategy, the learning curve of the subjects in different tasks and the coordination of foot movements with the two natural hands. Results show that the limbs are moved simultaneously, in parallel rather than serially. Participants' performance improved within a few minutes of practice without any specific difficulty to complete the tasks. Subjective assessment by the subjects indicated that controlling a third hand by foot has been easy and required only negligible physical and mental efforts. The sense of ownership was reported to improve through the experiments. The mental burden was not directly related to the level of motion required by a task, but depended on the type of activity and practice. The most difficult task was moving two hands and foot in opposite directions. These results suggest that a combination of practice and appropriate tasks can enhance the learning process for controlling a robotic hand by foot.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Histogram of the time to reach the three targets.0ms corresponds to the time of reaching the first target.
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pone.0134501.g003: Histogram of the time to reach the three targets.0ms corresponds to the time of reaching the first target.

Mentions: Participants were free to choose the sequence of touching the rectangles i.e. a subject could start with touching the right rectangle, then continue with touching the left rectangle and the middle one or they could choose any other sequence. Fig 3 shows the distribution of times to reach the three targets. A first hypothesis is that to simplify computation of the movement, the subjects would move the virtual hands in a definite order. If the movements of the three hands would be carried out serially, we would see separated distributions of the arrival to each target. In contrast the overlap of the temporal distributions of reaching the three targets suggests that there is no priority in the sequence of limb actions, and the movements of the three limbs are carried out in parallel.


Control of a Supernumerary Robotic Hand by Foot: An Experimental Study in Virtual Reality.

Abdi E, Burdet E, Bouri M, Bleuler H - PLoS ONE (2015)

Histogram of the time to reach the three targets.0ms corresponds to the time of reaching the first target.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4520700&req=5

pone.0134501.g003: Histogram of the time to reach the three targets.0ms corresponds to the time of reaching the first target.
Mentions: Participants were free to choose the sequence of touching the rectangles i.e. a subject could start with touching the right rectangle, then continue with touching the left rectangle and the middle one or they could choose any other sequence. Fig 3 shows the distribution of times to reach the three targets. A first hypothesis is that to simplify computation of the movement, the subjects would move the virtual hands in a definite order. If the movements of the three hands would be carried out serially, we would see separated distributions of the arrival to each target. In contrast the overlap of the temporal distributions of reaching the three targets suggests that there is no priority in the sequence of limb actions, and the movements of the three limbs are carried out in parallel.

Bottom Line: In the operational theater, the surgical team could highly benefit from a robotic supplementary hand under the surgeon's full control.Participants' performance improved within a few minutes of practice without any specific difficulty to complete the tasks.These results suggest that a combination of practice and appropriate tasks can enhance the learning process for controlling a robotic hand by foot.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Robotic Systems Laboratory, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne, Switzerland.

ABSTRACT
In the operational theater, the surgical team could highly benefit from a robotic supplementary hand under the surgeon's full control. The surgeon may so become more autonomous; this may reduce communication errors with the assistants and take over difficult tasks such as holding tools without tremor. In this paper, we therefore examine the possibility to control a third robotic hand with one foot's movements. Three experiments in virtual reality were designed to assess the feasibility of this control strategy, the learning curve of the subjects in different tasks and the coordination of foot movements with the two natural hands. Results show that the limbs are moved simultaneously, in parallel rather than serially. Participants' performance improved within a few minutes of practice without any specific difficulty to complete the tasks. Subjective assessment by the subjects indicated that controlling a third hand by foot has been easy and required only negligible physical and mental efforts. The sense of ownership was reported to improve through the experiments. The mental burden was not directly related to the level of motion required by a task, but depended on the type of activity and practice. The most difficult task was moving two hands and foot in opposite directions. These results suggest that a combination of practice and appropriate tasks can enhance the learning process for controlling a robotic hand by foot.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus