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Effect of Ecological Restoration on Body Condition of a Predator.

González-Tokman D, Martínez-Garza C - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: We predicted (1) better body condition in spiders of conserved and restored sites, compared to disturbed sites, and (2) better body condition in plots with maximal intervention than in plots with minimal intervention.We discuss how different life histories and environmental pressures, such as food availability, parasitism, and competition for resources can explain our contrasting findings in male and female spiders.By studying animal physiology in restoration experiments it is possible to understand the mechanistic basis of ecological and evolutionary processes that determine success of ecological restoration.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centro de Investigación en Biodiversidad y Conservación, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos. Cuernavaca, Morelos, México; Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología, Cátedras CONACYT, México, D. F., México.

ABSTRACT
Ecological restoration attempts to recover the structure and function of ecosystems that have been degraded by human activities. A crucial test of ecosystem recovery would be to determine whether individuals in restored environments are as healthy as those in conserved environments. However, the impact of restoration on physiology of terrestrial animals has never been tested. Here, we evaluated the effect of two restoration methods on body condition measured as body size, body mass, lipid and muscle content of the spider Nephila clavipes in a tropical dry forest that has suffered chronic disturbance due to cattle grazing. We used experimental plots that had been excluded from disturbance by cattle grazing during eight years. Plots were either planted with native trees (i. e. maximal intervention), or only excluded from disturbance (i. e. minimal intervention), and were compared with control conserved (remnants of original forest) and disturbed plots (where cattle is allowed to graze). We predicted (1) better body condition in spiders of conserved and restored sites, compared to disturbed sites, and (2) better body condition in plots with maximal intervention than in plots with minimal intervention. The first prediction was not supported in males or females, and the second prediction was only supported in females: body dry mass was higher in planted than in conserved plots for spiders of both sexes and also higher that in disturbed plots for males, suggesting that plantings are providing more resources. We discuss how different life histories and environmental pressures, such as food availability, parasitism, and competition for resources can explain our contrasting findings in male and female spiders. By studying animal physiology in restoration experiments it is possible to understand the mechanistic basis of ecological and evolutionary processes that determine success of ecological restoration.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Relation between body size and body condition in Nephila clavipes female spiders.Condition was measured as a) body dry mass, b) lipid mass, and c) muscle mass. Data on the y axis are square root transformed.
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pone.0133551.g002: Relation between body size and body condition in Nephila clavipes female spiders.Condition was measured as a) body dry mass, b) lipid mass, and c) muscle mass. Data on the y axis are square root transformed.

Mentions: In females, body dry mass, lipid and muscle mass were dependent on restoration treatment and body size (Table 1). In general, contrary to our predictions, female body condition (body, lipid, and muscle mass) was higher in disturbed than in conserved plots (Table 2, Fig 1A, 1B and 1C). As predicted, female body condition was higher in planted than in excluded plots (Table 2, Fig 1A, 1B and 1C). Females from excluded and disturbed plots did not differ in any of the physiological variables tested (Table 2). Body size was positively related with body, lipid and muscle mass (Fig 2A, 2B and 2C).


Effect of Ecological Restoration on Body Condition of a Predator.

González-Tokman D, Martínez-Garza C - PLoS ONE (2015)

Relation between body size and body condition in Nephila clavipes female spiders.Condition was measured as a) body dry mass, b) lipid mass, and c) muscle mass. Data on the y axis are square root transformed.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4520667&req=5

pone.0133551.g002: Relation between body size and body condition in Nephila clavipes female spiders.Condition was measured as a) body dry mass, b) lipid mass, and c) muscle mass. Data on the y axis are square root transformed.
Mentions: In females, body dry mass, lipid and muscle mass were dependent on restoration treatment and body size (Table 1). In general, contrary to our predictions, female body condition (body, lipid, and muscle mass) was higher in disturbed than in conserved plots (Table 2, Fig 1A, 1B and 1C). As predicted, female body condition was higher in planted than in excluded plots (Table 2, Fig 1A, 1B and 1C). Females from excluded and disturbed plots did not differ in any of the physiological variables tested (Table 2). Body size was positively related with body, lipid and muscle mass (Fig 2A, 2B and 2C).

Bottom Line: We predicted (1) better body condition in spiders of conserved and restored sites, compared to disturbed sites, and (2) better body condition in plots with maximal intervention than in plots with minimal intervention.We discuss how different life histories and environmental pressures, such as food availability, parasitism, and competition for resources can explain our contrasting findings in male and female spiders.By studying animal physiology in restoration experiments it is possible to understand the mechanistic basis of ecological and evolutionary processes that determine success of ecological restoration.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centro de Investigación en Biodiversidad y Conservación, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos. Cuernavaca, Morelos, México; Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología, Cátedras CONACYT, México, D. F., México.

ABSTRACT
Ecological restoration attempts to recover the structure and function of ecosystems that have been degraded by human activities. A crucial test of ecosystem recovery would be to determine whether individuals in restored environments are as healthy as those in conserved environments. However, the impact of restoration on physiology of terrestrial animals has never been tested. Here, we evaluated the effect of two restoration methods on body condition measured as body size, body mass, lipid and muscle content of the spider Nephila clavipes in a tropical dry forest that has suffered chronic disturbance due to cattle grazing. We used experimental plots that had been excluded from disturbance by cattle grazing during eight years. Plots were either planted with native trees (i. e. maximal intervention), or only excluded from disturbance (i. e. minimal intervention), and were compared with control conserved (remnants of original forest) and disturbed plots (where cattle is allowed to graze). We predicted (1) better body condition in spiders of conserved and restored sites, compared to disturbed sites, and (2) better body condition in plots with maximal intervention than in plots with minimal intervention. The first prediction was not supported in males or females, and the second prediction was only supported in females: body dry mass was higher in planted than in conserved plots for spiders of both sexes and also higher that in disturbed plots for males, suggesting that plantings are providing more resources. We discuss how different life histories and environmental pressures, such as food availability, parasitism, and competition for resources can explain our contrasting findings in male and female spiders. By studying animal physiology in restoration experiments it is possible to understand the mechanistic basis of ecological and evolutionary processes that determine success of ecological restoration.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus