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Emergence of Leadership within a Homogeneous Group.

Eskridge BE, Valle E, Schlupp I - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: In the simulations presented here, we investigate the emergence of leadership in the extreme situation in which all individuals are initially identical.Most importantly, our results show that small differences in experience can promote the rapid emergence of stable roles for leaders and followers.Our findings have implications for our understanding of adaptive behaviors in initially homogeneous groups, the role experience can play in shaping leadership tendencies, and the use of self-assessment in adapting behavior and, ultimately, self-role-assignment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Computer Science and Network Engineering, Southern Nazarene University, Bethany, Oklahoma, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Large scale coordination without dominant, consistent leadership is frequent in nature. How individuals emerge from within the group as leaders, however transitory this position may be, has become an increasingly common question asked. This question is further complicated by the fact that in many of these aggregations, differences between individuals are minor and the group is largely considered to be homogeneous. In the simulations presented here, we investigate the emergence of leadership in the extreme situation in which all individuals are initially identical. Using a mathematical model developed using observations of natural systems, we show that the addition of a simple concept of leadership tendencies which is inspired by observations of natural systems and is affected by experience can produce distinct leaders and followers using a nonlinear feedback loop. Most importantly, our results show that small differences in experience can promote the rapid emergence of stable roles for leaders and followers. Our findings have implications for our understanding of adaptive behaviors in initially homogeneous groups, the role experience can play in shaping leadership tendencies, and the use of self-assessment in adapting behavior and, ultimately, self-role-assignment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Two representative LT value histories depicting transitions between extremes are shown.Although LT values were relatively stable after the entire group had adapted, transitions between the extremes did occur. The more common transition was (a) from low to high LT value (N = 60 and initially high LT values). However, a few rare (b) high to low LT value transitions were observed (N = 10 and initially high LT values).
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pone.0134222.g006: Two representative LT value histories depicting transitions between extremes are shown.Although LT values were relatively stable after the entire group had adapted, transitions between the extremes did occur. The more common transition was (a) from low to high LT value (N = 60 and initially high LT values). However, a few rare (b) high to low LT value transitions were observed (N = 10 and initially high LT values).

Mentions: Once individual LT values differentiated, the majority remained stable with only minor fluctuations. There were a number of instances of low LT values transitioning to high LT values well after the initial differentiation of personalities, but only two instances of a high LT value transitioning to low (see Fig 6). Fig 7 shows the mean percentage of the evaluation group size in which a LT value transitioned from low to high. Excluding a group size of 15, evaluations with an initially high LT value were more stable than evaluations with initially low and moderate LT values (see S4 Table for a complete statistical analysis).


Emergence of Leadership within a Homogeneous Group.

Eskridge BE, Valle E, Schlupp I - PLoS ONE (2015)

Two representative LT value histories depicting transitions between extremes are shown.Although LT values were relatively stable after the entire group had adapted, transitions between the extremes did occur. The more common transition was (a) from low to high LT value (N = 60 and initially high LT values). However, a few rare (b) high to low LT value transitions were observed (N = 10 and initially high LT values).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4520564&req=5

pone.0134222.g006: Two representative LT value histories depicting transitions between extremes are shown.Although LT values were relatively stable after the entire group had adapted, transitions between the extremes did occur. The more common transition was (a) from low to high LT value (N = 60 and initially high LT values). However, a few rare (b) high to low LT value transitions were observed (N = 10 and initially high LT values).
Mentions: Once individual LT values differentiated, the majority remained stable with only minor fluctuations. There were a number of instances of low LT values transitioning to high LT values well after the initial differentiation of personalities, but only two instances of a high LT value transitioning to low (see Fig 6). Fig 7 shows the mean percentage of the evaluation group size in which a LT value transitioned from low to high. Excluding a group size of 15, evaluations with an initially high LT value were more stable than evaluations with initially low and moderate LT values (see S4 Table for a complete statistical analysis).

Bottom Line: In the simulations presented here, we investigate the emergence of leadership in the extreme situation in which all individuals are initially identical.Most importantly, our results show that small differences in experience can promote the rapid emergence of stable roles for leaders and followers.Our findings have implications for our understanding of adaptive behaviors in initially homogeneous groups, the role experience can play in shaping leadership tendencies, and the use of self-assessment in adapting behavior and, ultimately, self-role-assignment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Computer Science and Network Engineering, Southern Nazarene University, Bethany, Oklahoma, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Large scale coordination without dominant, consistent leadership is frequent in nature. How individuals emerge from within the group as leaders, however transitory this position may be, has become an increasingly common question asked. This question is further complicated by the fact that in many of these aggregations, differences between individuals are minor and the group is largely considered to be homogeneous. In the simulations presented here, we investigate the emergence of leadership in the extreme situation in which all individuals are initially identical. Using a mathematical model developed using observations of natural systems, we show that the addition of a simple concept of leadership tendencies which is inspired by observations of natural systems and is affected by experience can produce distinct leaders and followers using a nonlinear feedback loop. Most importantly, our results show that small differences in experience can promote the rapid emergence of stable roles for leaders and followers. Our findings have implications for our understanding of adaptive behaviors in initially homogeneous groups, the role experience can play in shaping leadership tendencies, and the use of self-assessment in adapting behavior and, ultimately, self-role-assignment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus