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Emotional Valence, Arousal, and Threat Ratings of 160 Chinese Words among Adolescents.

Ho SM, Mak CW, Yeung D, Duan W, Tang S, Yeung JC, Ching R - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: More than 90% of the participants, junior high school students aged between 12 and 17 years, understood the words.The participants were from both mainland China and Hong Kong, thus the words can be applied to adolescents familiar with either simplified (e.g. in mainland China) or traditional Chinese (e.g. in Hong Kong) with a junior secondary school education or higher.Thus, the new emotional word list provides a useful source of information for affective research in the Chinese language.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Psychology Laboratories, Department of Applied Social Sciences, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.

ABSTRACT
This study was conducted to provide ratings of valence/pleasantness, arousal/excitement, and threat/potential harm for 160 Chinese words. The emotional valence classification (positive, negative, or neutral) of all of the words corresponded to that of the equivalent English language words. More than 90% of the participants, junior high school students aged between 12 and 17 years, understood the words. The participants were from both mainland China and Hong Kong, thus the words can be applied to adolescents familiar with either simplified (e.g. in mainland China) or traditional Chinese (e.g. in Hong Kong) with a junior secondary school education or higher. We also established eight words with negative valence, high threat, and high arousal ratings to facilitate future research, especially on attentional and memory biases among individuals prone to anxiety. Thus, the new emotional word list provides a useful source of information for affective research in the Chinese language.

No MeSH data available.


Distribution of the mean values (positive, negative, and neutral types of words) for the ratings of the 160 Chinese words in valence and arousal dimensions.
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pone.0132294.g001: Distribution of the mean values (positive, negative, and neutral types of words) for the ratings of the 160 Chinese words in valence and arousal dimensions.

Mentions: Moors and colleagues [18] did not find a significant correlation between valence and arousal scores (r = -.01). Although we found a significant linear relationship between these two variables in our study (r = -.43, p < .01), a U-shaped pattern fit our data significantly better than a linear relationship (Fig 1). Consistent with other studies [7, 12, 13, 17, 21], words that are very positive or very negative tended to arouse more excitement among our adolescent participants. As expected, more negative words tended to arouse more threat (r = -.79, p < .01) and more threatening words elicited more arousal (r = .62, p < .01). Finally, the correlational results (Table 6) showed that more negative words tended to be perceived as more threatening while more threatening words tended to elicit more arousal, as would be expected.


Emotional Valence, Arousal, and Threat Ratings of 160 Chinese Words among Adolescents.

Ho SM, Mak CW, Yeung D, Duan W, Tang S, Yeung JC, Ching R - PLoS ONE (2015)

Distribution of the mean values (positive, negative, and neutral types of words) for the ratings of the 160 Chinese words in valence and arousal dimensions.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4520557&req=5

pone.0132294.g001: Distribution of the mean values (positive, negative, and neutral types of words) for the ratings of the 160 Chinese words in valence and arousal dimensions.
Mentions: Moors and colleagues [18] did not find a significant correlation between valence and arousal scores (r = -.01). Although we found a significant linear relationship between these two variables in our study (r = -.43, p < .01), a U-shaped pattern fit our data significantly better than a linear relationship (Fig 1). Consistent with other studies [7, 12, 13, 17, 21], words that are very positive or very negative tended to arouse more excitement among our adolescent participants. As expected, more negative words tended to arouse more threat (r = -.79, p < .01) and more threatening words elicited more arousal (r = .62, p < .01). Finally, the correlational results (Table 6) showed that more negative words tended to be perceived as more threatening while more threatening words tended to elicit more arousal, as would be expected.

Bottom Line: More than 90% of the participants, junior high school students aged between 12 and 17 years, understood the words.The participants were from both mainland China and Hong Kong, thus the words can be applied to adolescents familiar with either simplified (e.g. in mainland China) or traditional Chinese (e.g. in Hong Kong) with a junior secondary school education or higher.Thus, the new emotional word list provides a useful source of information for affective research in the Chinese language.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Psychology Laboratories, Department of Applied Social Sciences, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.

ABSTRACT
This study was conducted to provide ratings of valence/pleasantness, arousal/excitement, and threat/potential harm for 160 Chinese words. The emotional valence classification (positive, negative, or neutral) of all of the words corresponded to that of the equivalent English language words. More than 90% of the participants, junior high school students aged between 12 and 17 years, understood the words. The participants were from both mainland China and Hong Kong, thus the words can be applied to adolescents familiar with either simplified (e.g. in mainland China) or traditional Chinese (e.g. in Hong Kong) with a junior secondary school education or higher. We also established eight words with negative valence, high threat, and high arousal ratings to facilitate future research, especially on attentional and memory biases among individuals prone to anxiety. Thus, the new emotional word list provides a useful source of information for affective research in the Chinese language.

No MeSH data available.