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Local Activity and Causal Connectivity in Children with Benign Epilepsy with Centrotemporal Spikes.

Wu Y, Ji GJ, Zang YF, Liao W, Jin Z, Liu YL, Li K, Zeng YW, Fang F - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Granger causality analysis was applied to explore the causal effect between EZ and the whole brain.Compared with controls, the patients showed increased driving effect from the EZ to the right medial frontal cortex and posterior cingulate cortex and decreased causal effects from the EZ to left inferior frontal gyrus.The causal effect of the left inferior frontal gyrus negatively correlated with disease duration, which suggests a relation between the epileptiform activity and language impairment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Beijing Children's Hospital Affiliated to Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
The aim of the current study was to localize the epileptic focus and characterize its causal relation with other brain regions, to understand the cognitive deficits in children with benign childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS). Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was performed in 37 children with BECTS and 25 children matched for age, sex and educational achievement. We identified the potential epileptogenic zone (EZ) by comparing the amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (ALFF) of spontaneous blood oxygenation level dependent fMRI signals between the groups. Granger causality analysis was applied to explore the causal effect between EZ and the whole brain. Compared with controls, children with BECTS had significantly increased ALFF in the right postcentral gyrus and bilateral calcarine, and decreased ALFF in the left anterior cingulate cortex, bilateral putaman/caudate, and left cerebellum. ALFF values in the putaman/caudate were positively correlated with verbal IQ scores in patients. The ALFF values in cerebellum and performance IQ scores were negatively correlated in patients. These results suggest that ALFF disturbances in the putaman/caudate and cerebellum play an important role in BECTS cognitive dysfunction. Compared with controls, the patients showed increased driving effect from the EZ to the right medial frontal cortex and posterior cingulate cortex and decreased causal effects from the EZ to left inferior frontal gyrus. The causal effect of the left inferior frontal gyrus negatively correlated with disease duration, which suggests a relation between the epileptiform activity and language impairment. All together, these findings provide additional insight into the neurophysiological mechanisms of epilepitogenisis and cognitive dysfunction associated with BECTS.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Brain regions showing abnormal ALFF in patients with BECTS.The warm (red) and cold (blue) colors represent higher and lower ALFF, respectively, in patients compared with controls (P<0.05, corrected). Color bar represents t values.
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pone.0134361.g001: Brain regions showing abnormal ALFF in patients with BECTS.The warm (red) and cold (blue) colors represent higher and lower ALFF, respectively, in patients compared with controls (P<0.05, corrected). Color bar represents t values.

Mentions: As compared with the healthy controls, the patients with BECTS showed significantly increased ALFF in the right postcentral gyrus and bilateral calcarine (P < 0.05 corrected) (Table 2 and Fig 1). Brain regions showing decreased ALFF included the left anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), bilateral putamen/caudate and left cerebellum (P < 0.05 corrected) (Table 2 and Fig 1).


Local Activity and Causal Connectivity in Children with Benign Epilepsy with Centrotemporal Spikes.

Wu Y, Ji GJ, Zang YF, Liao W, Jin Z, Liu YL, Li K, Zeng YW, Fang F - PLoS ONE (2015)

Brain regions showing abnormal ALFF in patients with BECTS.The warm (red) and cold (blue) colors represent higher and lower ALFF, respectively, in patients compared with controls (P<0.05, corrected). Color bar represents t values.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4520539&req=5

pone.0134361.g001: Brain regions showing abnormal ALFF in patients with BECTS.The warm (red) and cold (blue) colors represent higher and lower ALFF, respectively, in patients compared with controls (P<0.05, corrected). Color bar represents t values.
Mentions: As compared with the healthy controls, the patients with BECTS showed significantly increased ALFF in the right postcentral gyrus and bilateral calcarine (P < 0.05 corrected) (Table 2 and Fig 1). Brain regions showing decreased ALFF included the left anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), bilateral putamen/caudate and left cerebellum (P < 0.05 corrected) (Table 2 and Fig 1).

Bottom Line: Granger causality analysis was applied to explore the causal effect between EZ and the whole brain.Compared with controls, the patients showed increased driving effect from the EZ to the right medial frontal cortex and posterior cingulate cortex and decreased causal effects from the EZ to left inferior frontal gyrus.The causal effect of the left inferior frontal gyrus negatively correlated with disease duration, which suggests a relation between the epileptiform activity and language impairment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Beijing Children's Hospital Affiliated to Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
The aim of the current study was to localize the epileptic focus and characterize its causal relation with other brain regions, to understand the cognitive deficits in children with benign childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS). Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was performed in 37 children with BECTS and 25 children matched for age, sex and educational achievement. We identified the potential epileptogenic zone (EZ) by comparing the amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (ALFF) of spontaneous blood oxygenation level dependent fMRI signals between the groups. Granger causality analysis was applied to explore the causal effect between EZ and the whole brain. Compared with controls, children with BECTS had significantly increased ALFF in the right postcentral gyrus and bilateral calcarine, and decreased ALFF in the left anterior cingulate cortex, bilateral putaman/caudate, and left cerebellum. ALFF values in the putaman/caudate were positively correlated with verbal IQ scores in patients. The ALFF values in cerebellum and performance IQ scores were negatively correlated in patients. These results suggest that ALFF disturbances in the putaman/caudate and cerebellum play an important role in BECTS cognitive dysfunction. Compared with controls, the patients showed increased driving effect from the EZ to the right medial frontal cortex and posterior cingulate cortex and decreased causal effects from the EZ to left inferior frontal gyrus. The causal effect of the left inferior frontal gyrus negatively correlated with disease duration, which suggests a relation between the epileptiform activity and language impairment. All together, these findings provide additional insight into the neurophysiological mechanisms of epilepitogenisis and cognitive dysfunction associated with BECTS.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus