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Differences in Early Stages of Tactile ERP Temporal Sequence (P100) in Cortical Organization during Passive Tactile Stimulation in Children with Blindness and Controls.

Ortiz Alonso T, Santos JM, Ortiz Terán L, Borrego Hernández M, Poch Broto J, de Erausquin GA - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: On the other hand, they are equally proficient in recognizing stimuli with semantic content (letters).The last observation is consistent with the role of P100 on somatosensory-based recognition of complex forms.The cortical differences between seeing control and blind groups, during spatial tactile discrimination, are associated with activation in visual pathway (occipital) and task-related association (temporal and frontal) areas.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Complutense, Madrid, Spain.

ABSTRACT
Compared to their seeing counterparts, people with blindness have a greater tactile capacity. Differences in the physiology of object recognition between people with blindness and seeing people have been well documented, but not when tactile stimuli require semantic processing. We used a passive vibrotactile device to focus on the differences in spatial brain processing evaluated with event related potentials (ERP) in children with blindness (n = 12) vs. normally seeing children (n = 12), when learning a simple spatial task (lines with different orientations) or a task involving recognition of letters, to describe the early stages of its temporal sequence (from 80 to 220 msec) and to search for evidence of multi-modal cortical organization. We analysed the P100 of the ERP. Children with blindness showed earlier latencies for cognitive (perceptual) event related potentials, shorter reaction times, and (paradoxically) worse ability to identify the spatial direction of the stimulus. On the other hand, they are equally proficient in recognizing stimuli with semantic content (letters). The last observation is consistent with the role of P100 on somatosensory-based recognition of complex forms. The cortical differences between seeing control and blind groups, during spatial tactile discrimination, are associated with activation in visual pathway (occipital) and task-related association (temporal and frontal) areas. The present results show that early processing of tactile stimulation conveying cross modal information differs in children with blindness or with normal vision.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Statistical Mapping (SM) independent Hotelling T2 significant differences in P100 peak intensity between children with blindness and their seeing controls following presentation of non-target stimuli in the letter recognition (panel a) and line orientation (panel b) tasks.Red color represents p < .05. For description of individual anatomical areas see Table 4.
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pone.0124527.g005: Statistical Mapping (SM) independent Hotelling T2 significant differences in P100 peak intensity between children with blindness and their seeing controls following presentation of non-target stimuli in the letter recognition (panel a) and line orientation (panel b) tasks.Red color represents p < .05. For description of individual anatomical areas see Table 4.

Mentions: At the peak amplitude of P100 during tactile presentation of lines, children with blindness had greater activation (compared to seeing children) in right occipital, inferior frontal and medial temporal cortex (see below), whereas seeing children had greater activation of right medial frontal and superior temporal cortex (Table 4). During the tactile presentation of letters, on the other hand, children with blindness had greater P100 activations in right frontal, supramarginal and temporal cortex (Table 4), as well as the left inferior temporal gyrus. In children with blindess, in summary, during tactile stimulation the areas of maximal activation during P100 were located in right visual and association areas regardless of the stimuli (Fig 4). Differences between the patterns of activation specific for each task are shown in statistical maps in Fig 5.


Differences in Early Stages of Tactile ERP Temporal Sequence (P100) in Cortical Organization during Passive Tactile Stimulation in Children with Blindness and Controls.

Ortiz Alonso T, Santos JM, Ortiz Terán L, Borrego Hernández M, Poch Broto J, de Erausquin GA - PLoS ONE (2015)

Statistical Mapping (SM) independent Hotelling T2 significant differences in P100 peak intensity between children with blindness and their seeing controls following presentation of non-target stimuli in the letter recognition (panel a) and line orientation (panel b) tasks.Red color represents p < .05. For description of individual anatomical areas see Table 4.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4520520&req=5

pone.0124527.g005: Statistical Mapping (SM) independent Hotelling T2 significant differences in P100 peak intensity between children with blindness and their seeing controls following presentation of non-target stimuli in the letter recognition (panel a) and line orientation (panel b) tasks.Red color represents p < .05. For description of individual anatomical areas see Table 4.
Mentions: At the peak amplitude of P100 during tactile presentation of lines, children with blindness had greater activation (compared to seeing children) in right occipital, inferior frontal and medial temporal cortex (see below), whereas seeing children had greater activation of right medial frontal and superior temporal cortex (Table 4). During the tactile presentation of letters, on the other hand, children with blindness had greater P100 activations in right frontal, supramarginal and temporal cortex (Table 4), as well as the left inferior temporal gyrus. In children with blindess, in summary, during tactile stimulation the areas of maximal activation during P100 were located in right visual and association areas regardless of the stimuli (Fig 4). Differences between the patterns of activation specific for each task are shown in statistical maps in Fig 5.

Bottom Line: On the other hand, they are equally proficient in recognizing stimuli with semantic content (letters).The last observation is consistent with the role of P100 on somatosensory-based recognition of complex forms.The cortical differences between seeing control and blind groups, during spatial tactile discrimination, are associated with activation in visual pathway (occipital) and task-related association (temporal and frontal) areas.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Complutense, Madrid, Spain.

ABSTRACT
Compared to their seeing counterparts, people with blindness have a greater tactile capacity. Differences in the physiology of object recognition between people with blindness and seeing people have been well documented, but not when tactile stimuli require semantic processing. We used a passive vibrotactile device to focus on the differences in spatial brain processing evaluated with event related potentials (ERP) in children with blindness (n = 12) vs. normally seeing children (n = 12), when learning a simple spatial task (lines with different orientations) or a task involving recognition of letters, to describe the early stages of its temporal sequence (from 80 to 220 msec) and to search for evidence of multi-modal cortical organization. We analysed the P100 of the ERP. Children with blindness showed earlier latencies for cognitive (perceptual) event related potentials, shorter reaction times, and (paradoxically) worse ability to identify the spatial direction of the stimulus. On the other hand, they are equally proficient in recognizing stimuli with semantic content (letters). The last observation is consistent with the role of P100 on somatosensory-based recognition of complex forms. The cortical differences between seeing control and blind groups, during spatial tactile discrimination, are associated with activation in visual pathway (occipital) and task-related association (temporal and frontal) areas. The present results show that early processing of tactile stimulation conveying cross modal information differs in children with blindness or with normal vision.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus