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Association of Visceral Fat Area, Smoking, and Alcohol Consumption with Reflux Esophagitis and Barrett's Esophagus in Japan.

Matsuzaki J, Suzuki H, Kobayakawa M, Inadomi JM, Takayama M, Makino K, Iwao Y, Sugino Y, Kanai T - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Central obesity has been suggested as a risk factor for gastroesophageal reflux disease.A total of 2608 individuals were eligible for the analyses.On the other hand, quantity of alcohol consumption could play a role in the development of severe reflux esophagitis and Barrett's esophagus in Japanese population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Preventive Medicine, Keio University Hospital, Tokyo, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Central obesity has been suggested as a risk factor for gastroesophageal reflux disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of visceral fat area and other lifestyle factors with reflux esophagitis or Barrett's esophagus in Japanese population.

Methods: Individuals who received thorough medical examinations including the measurement of visceral fat area by abdominal computed tomography were enrolled. Factors associated with the presence of reflux esophagitis, the severity of reflux esophagitis, or the presence of Barrett's esophagus were determined using multivariable logistic regression models.

Results: A total of 2608 individuals were eligible for the analyses. Visceral fat area was associated with the presence of reflux esophagitis both in men (odds ratio, 1.21 per 50 cm2; 95% confident interval, 1.01 to 1.46) and women (odds ratio, 2.31 per 50 cm2; 95% confident interval, 1.57 to 3.40). Current smoking and serum levels of triglyceride were also associated with the presence of reflux esophagitis in men. However, significant association between visceral fat area and the severity of reflux esophagitis or the presence of Barrett's esophagus was not shown. In men, excessive alcohol consumption on a drinking day, but not the frequency of alcohol drinking, was associated with both the severity of reflux esophagitis (odds ratio, 2.13; 95% confident interval, 1.03 to 4.41) and the presence of Barrett's esophagus (odds ratio, 1.71; 95% confident interval, 1.14 to 2.56).

Conclusion: Visceral fat area was independently associated with the presence of reflux esophagitis, but not with the presence of Barrett's esophagus. On the other hand, quantity of alcohol consumption could play a role in the development of severe reflux esophagitis and Barrett's esophagus in Japanese population.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Diagram of inclusion of the study population.
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pone.0133865.g001: Diagram of inclusion of the study population.

Mentions: A total of 2,783 individuals underwent thorough medical examinations including EGD during the study period (Fig 1). After we excluded 175 individuals who did not meet the inclusion criteria, 2,608 individuals (1,625 men and 983 women) were evaluated in this analysis. RE and BE were diagnosed in 216 (8.3%) and 139 (5.3%) individuals, respectively. Those with RE were divided into 164 individuals with mild RE and 52 with severe RE. In our study, all of BE were short-segment BE (SSBE). The raw data can be found in Supporting Information (S1 Raw Data).


Association of Visceral Fat Area, Smoking, and Alcohol Consumption with Reflux Esophagitis and Barrett's Esophagus in Japan.

Matsuzaki J, Suzuki H, Kobayakawa M, Inadomi JM, Takayama M, Makino K, Iwao Y, Sugino Y, Kanai T - PLoS ONE (2015)

Diagram of inclusion of the study population.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4520496&req=5

pone.0133865.g001: Diagram of inclusion of the study population.
Mentions: A total of 2,783 individuals underwent thorough medical examinations including EGD during the study period (Fig 1). After we excluded 175 individuals who did not meet the inclusion criteria, 2,608 individuals (1,625 men and 983 women) were evaluated in this analysis. RE and BE were diagnosed in 216 (8.3%) and 139 (5.3%) individuals, respectively. Those with RE were divided into 164 individuals with mild RE and 52 with severe RE. In our study, all of BE were short-segment BE (SSBE). The raw data can be found in Supporting Information (S1 Raw Data).

Bottom Line: Central obesity has been suggested as a risk factor for gastroesophageal reflux disease.A total of 2608 individuals were eligible for the analyses.On the other hand, quantity of alcohol consumption could play a role in the development of severe reflux esophagitis and Barrett's esophagus in Japanese population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Preventive Medicine, Keio University Hospital, Tokyo, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Central obesity has been suggested as a risk factor for gastroesophageal reflux disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of visceral fat area and other lifestyle factors with reflux esophagitis or Barrett's esophagus in Japanese population.

Methods: Individuals who received thorough medical examinations including the measurement of visceral fat area by abdominal computed tomography were enrolled. Factors associated with the presence of reflux esophagitis, the severity of reflux esophagitis, or the presence of Barrett's esophagus were determined using multivariable logistic regression models.

Results: A total of 2608 individuals were eligible for the analyses. Visceral fat area was associated with the presence of reflux esophagitis both in men (odds ratio, 1.21 per 50 cm2; 95% confident interval, 1.01 to 1.46) and women (odds ratio, 2.31 per 50 cm2; 95% confident interval, 1.57 to 3.40). Current smoking and serum levels of triglyceride were also associated with the presence of reflux esophagitis in men. However, significant association between visceral fat area and the severity of reflux esophagitis or the presence of Barrett's esophagus was not shown. In men, excessive alcohol consumption on a drinking day, but not the frequency of alcohol drinking, was associated with both the severity of reflux esophagitis (odds ratio, 2.13; 95% confident interval, 1.03 to 4.41) and the presence of Barrett's esophagus (odds ratio, 1.71; 95% confident interval, 1.14 to 2.56).

Conclusion: Visceral fat area was independently associated with the presence of reflux esophagitis, but not with the presence of Barrett's esophagus. On the other hand, quantity of alcohol consumption could play a role in the development of severe reflux esophagitis and Barrett's esophagus in Japanese population.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus