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Highest Resolution In Vivo Human Brain MRI Using Prospective Motion Correction.

Stucht D, Danishad KA, Schulze P, Godenschweger F, Zaitsev M, Speck O - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Even with a cooperative and trained subject, involuntary motion due to heartbeat, swallowing, respiration and changes in muscle tone can cause image artifacts that reduce the effective resolution.Prospective motion correction (PMC) at 3T and 7T has proven to increase image quality in case of subject motion.As a result, we present images among the highest, if not the highest resolution of in vivo human brain MRI ever acquired.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biomedical Magnetic Resonance, Otto-von-Guericke University, Magdeburg, Germany; Institute of Biometry and Medical Informatics, Otto-von-Guericke University, Magdeburg, Germany.

ABSTRACT
High field MRI systems, such as 7 Tesla (T) scanners, can deliver higher signal to noise ratio (SNR) than lower field scanners and thus allow for the acquisition of data with higher spatial resolution, which is often demanded by users in the fields of clinical and neuroscientific imaging. However, high resolution scans may require long acquisition times, which in turn increase the discomfort for the subject and the risk of subject motion. Even with a cooperative and trained subject, involuntary motion due to heartbeat, swallowing, respiration and changes in muscle tone can cause image artifacts that reduce the effective resolution. In addition, scanning with higher resolution leads to increased sensitivity to even very small movements. Prospective motion correction (PMC) at 3T and 7T has proven to increase image quality in case of subject motion. Although the application of prospective motion correction is becoming more popular, previous articles focused on proof of concept studies and technical descriptions, whereas this paper briefly describes the technical aspects of the optical tracking system, marker fixation and cross calibration and focuses on the application of PMC to very high resolution imaging without intentional motion. In this study we acquired in vivo MR images at 7T using prospective motion correction during long acquisitions. As a result, we present images among the highest, if not the highest resolution of in vivo human brain MRI ever acquired.

No MeSH data available.


One slice of the highest resolution GRE scan.At a resolution of 0.12 × 0.12 × 0.6 mm structures of one to two pixel in width are identifiable and clearly defined. Magnifications of the marked regions are shown below. See S1 Video for full data set.
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pone.0133921.g006: One slice of the highest resolution GRE scan.At a resolution of 0.12 × 0.12 × 0.6 mm structures of one to two pixel in width are identifiable and clearly defined. Magnifications of the marked regions are shown below. See S1 Video for full data set.

Mentions: High field MRI systems, such as 7 Tesla (T) scanners, can deliver higher signal to noise ratio (SNR) than lower field scanners and thus allow for the acquisition of data with higher spatial resolution, which is often demanded by users in the fields of clinical and neuroscientific imaging. However, high resolution scans may require long acquisition times, which in turn increase the discomfort for the subject and the risk of subject motion. Even with a cooperative and trained subject, involuntary motion due to heartbeat, swallowing, respiration and changes in muscle tone can cause image artifacts that reduce the effective resolution. In addition, scanning with higher resolution leads to increased sensitivity to even very small movements. Prospective motion correction (PMC) at 3T and 7T has proven to increase image quality in case of subject motion. Although the application of prospective motion correction is becoming more popular, previous articles focused on proof of concept studies and technical descriptions, whereas this paper briefly describes the technical aspects of the optical tracking system, marker fixation and cross calibration and focuses on the application of PMC to very high resolution imaging without intentional motion. In this study we acquired in vivo MR images at 7T using prospective motion correction during long acquisitions. As a result, we present images among the highest, if not the highest resolution of in vivo human brain MRI ever acquired.


Highest Resolution In Vivo Human Brain MRI Using Prospective Motion Correction.

Stucht D, Danishad KA, Schulze P, Godenschweger F, Zaitsev M, Speck O - PLoS ONE (2015)

One slice of the highest resolution GRE scan.At a resolution of 0.12 × 0.12 × 0.6 mm structures of one to two pixel in width are identifiable and clearly defined. Magnifications of the marked regions are shown below. See S1 Video for full data set.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4520483&req=5

pone.0133921.g006: One slice of the highest resolution GRE scan.At a resolution of 0.12 × 0.12 × 0.6 mm structures of one to two pixel in width are identifiable and clearly defined. Magnifications of the marked regions are shown below. See S1 Video for full data set.
Mentions: High field MRI systems, such as 7 Tesla (T) scanners, can deliver higher signal to noise ratio (SNR) than lower field scanners and thus allow for the acquisition of data with higher spatial resolution, which is often demanded by users in the fields of clinical and neuroscientific imaging. However, high resolution scans may require long acquisition times, which in turn increase the discomfort for the subject and the risk of subject motion. Even with a cooperative and trained subject, involuntary motion due to heartbeat, swallowing, respiration and changes in muscle tone can cause image artifacts that reduce the effective resolution. In addition, scanning with higher resolution leads to increased sensitivity to even very small movements. Prospective motion correction (PMC) at 3T and 7T has proven to increase image quality in case of subject motion. Although the application of prospective motion correction is becoming more popular, previous articles focused on proof of concept studies and technical descriptions, whereas this paper briefly describes the technical aspects of the optical tracking system, marker fixation and cross calibration and focuses on the application of PMC to very high resolution imaging without intentional motion. In this study we acquired in vivo MR images at 7T using prospective motion correction during long acquisitions. As a result, we present images among the highest, if not the highest resolution of in vivo human brain MRI ever acquired.

Bottom Line: Even with a cooperative and trained subject, involuntary motion due to heartbeat, swallowing, respiration and changes in muscle tone can cause image artifacts that reduce the effective resolution.Prospective motion correction (PMC) at 3T and 7T has proven to increase image quality in case of subject motion.As a result, we present images among the highest, if not the highest resolution of in vivo human brain MRI ever acquired.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biomedical Magnetic Resonance, Otto-von-Guericke University, Magdeburg, Germany; Institute of Biometry and Medical Informatics, Otto-von-Guericke University, Magdeburg, Germany.

ABSTRACT
High field MRI systems, such as 7 Tesla (T) scanners, can deliver higher signal to noise ratio (SNR) than lower field scanners and thus allow for the acquisition of data with higher spatial resolution, which is often demanded by users in the fields of clinical and neuroscientific imaging. However, high resolution scans may require long acquisition times, which in turn increase the discomfort for the subject and the risk of subject motion. Even with a cooperative and trained subject, involuntary motion due to heartbeat, swallowing, respiration and changes in muscle tone can cause image artifacts that reduce the effective resolution. In addition, scanning with higher resolution leads to increased sensitivity to even very small movements. Prospective motion correction (PMC) at 3T and 7T has proven to increase image quality in case of subject motion. Although the application of prospective motion correction is becoming more popular, previous articles focused on proof of concept studies and technical descriptions, whereas this paper briefly describes the technical aspects of the optical tracking system, marker fixation and cross calibration and focuses on the application of PMC to very high resolution imaging without intentional motion. In this study we acquired in vivo MR images at 7T using prospective motion correction during long acquisitions. As a result, we present images among the highest, if not the highest resolution of in vivo human brain MRI ever acquired.

No MeSH data available.