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Where Next for Genetics and Genomics?

Tyler-Smith C, Yang H, Landweber LF, Dunham I, Knoppers BM, Donnelly P, Mardis ER, Snyder M, McVean G - PLoS Biol. (2015)

Bottom Line: Without exception, the predictions are for more data on a massive scale and of more diverse types.All are optimistic and predict enormous positive impact on scientific understanding, while a recurring theme is the benefit of such data for the transformation and personalization of medicine.Several also point out that the biggest changes will very likely be those that we don't foresee, even now.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridgeshire, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
The last few decades have utterly transformed genetics and genomics, but what might the next ten years bring? PLOS Biology asked eight leaders spanning a range of related areas to give us their predictions. Without exception, the predictions are for more data on a massive scale and of more diverse types. All are optimistic and predict enormous positive impact on scientific understanding, while a recurring theme is the benefit of such data for the transformation and personalization of medicine. Several also point out that the biggest changes will very likely be those that we don't foresee, even now.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Predicting the future can be challenging.Romanet & cie, Paris; Collection 476, 2e série, N°. 2—“Les utopies de la navigation aérienne au siècle dernier.” Image credit: Public domain, from Wikimedia Commons.
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pbio.1002216.g001: Predicting the future can be challenging.Romanet & cie, Paris; Collection 476, 2e série, N°. 2—“Les utopies de la navigation aérienne au siècle dernier.” Image credit: Public domain, from Wikimedia Commons.

Mentions: Predictions about the future of a rapidly developing field are usually doomed to be overtaken by events or proved wrong (Fig 1) but are nonetheless irresistible to both authors and readers. It is difficult to find a parallel for the developments in genomic technology over the last decade, exemplified by the halving of sequencing costs each six months for much of this period. Where will this lead?


Where Next for Genetics and Genomics?

Tyler-Smith C, Yang H, Landweber LF, Dunham I, Knoppers BM, Donnelly P, Mardis ER, Snyder M, McVean G - PLoS Biol. (2015)

Predicting the future can be challenging.Romanet & cie, Paris; Collection 476, 2e série, N°. 2—“Les utopies de la navigation aérienne au siècle dernier.” Image credit: Public domain, from Wikimedia Commons.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4520474&req=5

pbio.1002216.g001: Predicting the future can be challenging.Romanet & cie, Paris; Collection 476, 2e série, N°. 2—“Les utopies de la navigation aérienne au siècle dernier.” Image credit: Public domain, from Wikimedia Commons.
Mentions: Predictions about the future of a rapidly developing field are usually doomed to be overtaken by events or proved wrong (Fig 1) but are nonetheless irresistible to both authors and readers. It is difficult to find a parallel for the developments in genomic technology over the last decade, exemplified by the halving of sequencing costs each six months for much of this period. Where will this lead?

Bottom Line: Without exception, the predictions are for more data on a massive scale and of more diverse types.All are optimistic and predict enormous positive impact on scientific understanding, while a recurring theme is the benefit of such data for the transformation and personalization of medicine.Several also point out that the biggest changes will very likely be those that we don't foresee, even now.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridgeshire, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
The last few decades have utterly transformed genetics and genomics, but what might the next ten years bring? PLOS Biology asked eight leaders spanning a range of related areas to give us their predictions. Without exception, the predictions are for more data on a massive scale and of more diverse types. All are optimistic and predict enormous positive impact on scientific understanding, while a recurring theme is the benefit of such data for the transformation and personalization of medicine. Several also point out that the biggest changes will very likely be those that we don't foresee, even now.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus