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Mathematical Modeling of Intravascular Blood Coagulation under Wall Shear Stress.

Rukhlenko OS, Dudchenko OA, Zlobina KE, Guria GT - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Numerical analysis of the model reveals the existence of two hydrodynamic thresholds for activation of blood coagulation in the system and unveils typical scenarios of thrombus formation.Relevant parametric diagrams are drawn.The results suggest a previously unrecognized role of relatively small plaques (resulting in less than 50% of the lumen area reduction) in atherothrombosis and have important implications for the existing stenting guidelines.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Research Center for Hematology, Moscow, Russia; Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny, Russia; Cherkasy National University, Cherkasy, Ukraine.

ABSTRACT
Increased shear stress such as observed at local stenosis may cause drastic changes in the permeability of the vessel wall to procoagulants and thus initiate intravascular blood coagulation. In this paper we suggest a mathematical model to investigate how shear stress-induced permeability influences the thrombogenic potential of atherosclerotic plaques. Numerical analysis of the model reveals the existence of two hydrodynamic thresholds for activation of blood coagulation in the system and unveils typical scenarios of thrombus formation. The dependence of blood coagulation development on the intensity of blood flow, as well as on geometrical parameters of atherosclerotic plaque is described. Relevant parametric diagrams are drawn. The results suggest a previously unrecognized role of relatively small plaques (resulting in less than 50% of the lumen area reduction) in atherothrombosis and have important implications for the existing stenting guidelines.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Geometry of the vessel fragment.Lx, Ly and H correspond to vessel length, cross section diameter and plaque height. Γin and Γout denote inlet and outlet boundaries respectively. Γ+ and Γ− refer to upper and lower vessel walls respectively.
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pone.0134028.g001: Geometry of the vessel fragment.Lx, Ly and H correspond to vessel length, cross section diameter and plaque height. Γin and Γout denote inlet and outlet boundaries respectively. Γ+ and Γ− refer to upper and lower vessel walls respectively.

Mentions: The geometry of the problem is shown in Fig 1. The vessel walls are assumed to be rigid. For specificity, the vessel profile is approximated with the following formula:f(x)=He-x22d2x∈[-(1/3)Lx;(2/3)Lx],(1)where Lx denotes vessel length, H denotes plaque height and d corresponds to one half of stenosis width (see Fig 1).


Mathematical Modeling of Intravascular Blood Coagulation under Wall Shear Stress.

Rukhlenko OS, Dudchenko OA, Zlobina KE, Guria GT - PLoS ONE (2015)

Geometry of the vessel fragment.Lx, Ly and H correspond to vessel length, cross section diameter and plaque height. Γin and Γout denote inlet and outlet boundaries respectively. Γ+ and Γ− refer to upper and lower vessel walls respectively.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4519339&req=5

pone.0134028.g001: Geometry of the vessel fragment.Lx, Ly and H correspond to vessel length, cross section diameter and plaque height. Γin and Γout denote inlet and outlet boundaries respectively. Γ+ and Γ− refer to upper and lower vessel walls respectively.
Mentions: The geometry of the problem is shown in Fig 1. The vessel walls are assumed to be rigid. For specificity, the vessel profile is approximated with the following formula:f(x)=He-x22d2x∈[-(1/3)Lx;(2/3)Lx],(1)where Lx denotes vessel length, H denotes plaque height and d corresponds to one half of stenosis width (see Fig 1).

Bottom Line: Numerical analysis of the model reveals the existence of two hydrodynamic thresholds for activation of blood coagulation in the system and unveils typical scenarios of thrombus formation.Relevant parametric diagrams are drawn.The results suggest a previously unrecognized role of relatively small plaques (resulting in less than 50% of the lumen area reduction) in atherothrombosis and have important implications for the existing stenting guidelines.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Research Center for Hematology, Moscow, Russia; Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny, Russia; Cherkasy National University, Cherkasy, Ukraine.

ABSTRACT
Increased shear stress such as observed at local stenosis may cause drastic changes in the permeability of the vessel wall to procoagulants and thus initiate intravascular blood coagulation. In this paper we suggest a mathematical model to investigate how shear stress-induced permeability influences the thrombogenic potential of atherosclerotic plaques. Numerical analysis of the model reveals the existence of two hydrodynamic thresholds for activation of blood coagulation in the system and unveils typical scenarios of thrombus formation. The dependence of blood coagulation development on the intensity of blood flow, as well as on geometrical parameters of atherosclerotic plaque is described. Relevant parametric diagrams are drawn. The results suggest a previously unrecognized role of relatively small plaques (resulting in less than 50% of the lumen area reduction) in atherothrombosis and have important implications for the existing stenting guidelines.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus