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Comparative Pharmacokinetics and Allometric Scaling of Carboplatin in Different Avian Species.

Antonissen G, Devreese M, De Baere S, Hellebuyck T, Van de Maele I, Rouffaer L, Stemkens HJ, De Backer P, Martel A, Croubels S - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Despite this, literature reports regarding dosing strategies and pharmacokinetic behaviour of chemotherapeutics in avian species are lacking.Non-compartmental pharmacokinetic analysis and allometric scaling demonstrated a significant correlation (R² = 0.9769) between body weight (BW) and elimination half-life (T1/2el).T1/2el is a good parameter for dose optimization of carboplatin in other avian species, since also the previously reported T1/2el in cockatoos (average BW: 769 ± 68 g) of 1.00 h corresponds to the results obtained in the present study.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Biochemistry, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Merelbeke, Belgium; Department of Pathology, Bacteriology and Avian Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Merelbeke, Belgium.

ABSTRACT
The use of chemotherapeutics as a possible treatment strategy in avian oncology is steadily increasing over the last years. Despite this, literature reports regarding dosing strategies and pharmacokinetic behaviour of chemotherapeutics in avian species are lacking. The aim of the present study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics of carboplatin in a representative species of the order of Galliformes, Anseriformes, Columbiformes and Psittaciformes. Eight chickens, ducks and pigeons and twenty-eight parakeets were administered carboplatin intravenously (5 mg/kg body weight). A specific and sensitive liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method was developed and validated for quantification of the free carboplatin in plasma of the four birds species (limit of quantification: 20 ng/mL for chicken and duck, 50 ng/mL for pigeon and 100 ng/mL for parakeets). Non-compartmental pharmacokinetic analysis and allometric scaling demonstrated a significant correlation (R² = 0.9769) between body weight (BW) and elimination half-life (T1/2el). T1/2el ranged from 0.41 h in parakeets (BW: 61 ± 8 g) to 1.16 h chickens (BW: 1909 ± 619 g). T1/2el is a good parameter for dose optimization of carboplatin in other avian species, since also the previously reported T1/2el in cockatoos (average BW: 769 ± 68 g) of 1.00 h corresponds to the results obtained in the present study.

No MeSH data available.


Allometric scaling of the elimination half-life of free carboplatin in different avian species derived from the present study (a) and in all species for which literature data are available (b).Elimination half-life values of rat, cockatoo, cat, dog and human were derived from [13, 22–25].
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pone.0134177.g002: Allometric scaling of the elimination half-life of free carboplatin in different avian species derived from the present study (a) and in all species for which literature data are available (b).Elimination half-life values of rat, cockatoo, cat, dog and human were derived from [13, 22–25].

Mentions: The plasma concentration-time profile and the main PK characteristics after IV administration of CPT to the different avian species are presented in Fig 1 and Table 1, respectively. There were no significant gender differences within one species (results not shown). Between avian species, significant differences were detected for AUC0-t, AUC0-inf, ke and T1/2el, but not for Vd and Cl. Allometric scaling revealed a good correlation between T1/2el and BW of the bird species (R² > 0.97), as depicted in Fig 2a. Furthermore, allometric scaling of the T1/2el was performed in different avian species derived from this study and in all species for which literature data are available, namely rat [22], cockatoo [13], cat [23], dog [24] and human [25]. Results are presented in Fig 2b. A moderate correlation between T1/2el and BW of the different species (R² > 0.82) was demonstrated.


Comparative Pharmacokinetics and Allometric Scaling of Carboplatin in Different Avian Species.

Antonissen G, Devreese M, De Baere S, Hellebuyck T, Van de Maele I, Rouffaer L, Stemkens HJ, De Backer P, Martel A, Croubels S - PLoS ONE (2015)

Allometric scaling of the elimination half-life of free carboplatin in different avian species derived from the present study (a) and in all species for which literature data are available (b).Elimination half-life values of rat, cockatoo, cat, dog and human were derived from [13, 22–25].
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4519271&req=5

pone.0134177.g002: Allometric scaling of the elimination half-life of free carboplatin in different avian species derived from the present study (a) and in all species for which literature data are available (b).Elimination half-life values of rat, cockatoo, cat, dog and human were derived from [13, 22–25].
Mentions: The plasma concentration-time profile and the main PK characteristics after IV administration of CPT to the different avian species are presented in Fig 1 and Table 1, respectively. There were no significant gender differences within one species (results not shown). Between avian species, significant differences were detected for AUC0-t, AUC0-inf, ke and T1/2el, but not for Vd and Cl. Allometric scaling revealed a good correlation between T1/2el and BW of the bird species (R² > 0.97), as depicted in Fig 2a. Furthermore, allometric scaling of the T1/2el was performed in different avian species derived from this study and in all species for which literature data are available, namely rat [22], cockatoo [13], cat [23], dog [24] and human [25]. Results are presented in Fig 2b. A moderate correlation between T1/2el and BW of the different species (R² > 0.82) was demonstrated.

Bottom Line: Despite this, literature reports regarding dosing strategies and pharmacokinetic behaviour of chemotherapeutics in avian species are lacking.Non-compartmental pharmacokinetic analysis and allometric scaling demonstrated a significant correlation (R² = 0.9769) between body weight (BW) and elimination half-life (T1/2el).T1/2el is a good parameter for dose optimization of carboplatin in other avian species, since also the previously reported T1/2el in cockatoos (average BW: 769 ± 68 g) of 1.00 h corresponds to the results obtained in the present study.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Biochemistry, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Merelbeke, Belgium; Department of Pathology, Bacteriology and Avian Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Merelbeke, Belgium.

ABSTRACT
The use of chemotherapeutics as a possible treatment strategy in avian oncology is steadily increasing over the last years. Despite this, literature reports regarding dosing strategies and pharmacokinetic behaviour of chemotherapeutics in avian species are lacking. The aim of the present study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics of carboplatin in a representative species of the order of Galliformes, Anseriformes, Columbiformes and Psittaciformes. Eight chickens, ducks and pigeons and twenty-eight parakeets were administered carboplatin intravenously (5 mg/kg body weight). A specific and sensitive liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method was developed and validated for quantification of the free carboplatin in plasma of the four birds species (limit of quantification: 20 ng/mL for chicken and duck, 50 ng/mL for pigeon and 100 ng/mL for parakeets). Non-compartmental pharmacokinetic analysis and allometric scaling demonstrated a significant correlation (R² = 0.9769) between body weight (BW) and elimination half-life (T1/2el). T1/2el ranged from 0.41 h in parakeets (BW: 61 ± 8 g) to 1.16 h chickens (BW: 1909 ± 619 g). T1/2el is a good parameter for dose optimization of carboplatin in other avian species, since also the previously reported T1/2el in cockatoos (average BW: 769 ± 68 g) of 1.00 h corresponds to the results obtained in the present study.

No MeSH data available.