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The Relationship Between Foot and Pelvic Alignment While Standing.

Khamis S, Dar G, Peretz C, Yizhar Z - J Hum Kinet (2015)

Bottom Line: A significant (p<0.05) bi-variate relationship was found between the anterior pelvic tilt and thigh internal rotation, in all four standing positions (.41≤r≤.46, in all p<0.014).A combined effect of rotational alignment between segments and the cumulative effect of foot hyperpronation on pelvic tilt revealed that only the shank significantly affected pelvic alignment, acting as a mediator between a foot and a thigh with the thigh having a crude significant effect on the pelvis.It can be concluded that in response to induced hyperpronation, the shank is a pivotal segment in postural adjustment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Gait and Motion Analysis Laboratory, Dana Children's Hospital, Tel-Aviv Medical Center, Tel-Aviv, Israel.

ABSTRACT
A normal motion and segmental interrelationship has been determined as a significant factor in normal function. Yet, the relationship between distal segments and pelvic alignment needs further investigation. The aim of this study was to investigate the interrelationship between distal and proximal lower extremity segments while standing and during induced feet hyperpronation. Changes in alignment of the pelvis and lower extremities were measured at a gait laboratory using the VICON 612 computerized motion analysis system. Thirty-five healthy volunteer subjects were recruited. Four randomized repeated-measure standing modes were used: standing directly on the floor and then on three wedges angled at 10°, 15° and 20° to induce bilateral hyperpronation for 20 seconds. A significant (p<0.05) bi-variate relationship was found between the anterior pelvic tilt and thigh internal rotation, in all four standing positions (.41≤r≤.46, in all p<0.014). A combined effect of rotational alignment between segments and the cumulative effect of foot hyperpronation on pelvic tilt revealed that only the shank significantly affected pelvic alignment, acting as a mediator between a foot and a thigh with the thigh having a crude significant effect on the pelvis. When internal rotation of the shank occurs, calcaneal eversion couples with thigh internal rotation and anterior pelvic tilt. It can be concluded that in response to induced hyperpronation, the shank is a pivotal segment in postural adjustment.

No MeSH data available.


1a. A flow chart describing the combined effect of the rotational alignment between the foot and the pelvis mediated by the shank. A crude effect of the foot or shank relates to their individual direct effect on the pelvis, while simultaneously an adjusted effect relates to their effect on the pelvis taking into account one another. p value indicates significance of effect.Crude effect of the foot on the pelvis;Crude effect of the foot on the shank;Crude effect of the shank on the pelvis;Adjusted effect of the foot on the pelvis;Adjusted effect of the shank on the pelvis.1b. A flow chart describing the combined effect of the rotational alignment between the foot and the pelvis mediated by the thigh. A crude effect of the foot or thigh relates to their individual direct effect on the pelvis, while simultaneously an adjusted effect relates to their effect on the pelvis taking into account one another. p value indicates significance of effect.Crude effect of the foot on the pelvis;Crude effect of the foot on the thigh;Crude effect of the thigh on the pelvis;Adjusted effect of the foot on the pelvis;Adjusted effect of the thigh on the pelvis.
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f1-jhk-46-85: 1a. A flow chart describing the combined effect of the rotational alignment between the foot and the pelvis mediated by the shank. A crude effect of the foot or shank relates to their individual direct effect on the pelvis, while simultaneously an adjusted effect relates to their effect on the pelvis taking into account one another. p value indicates significance of effect.Crude effect of the foot on the pelvis;Crude effect of the foot on the shank;Crude effect of the shank on the pelvis;Adjusted effect of the foot on the pelvis;Adjusted effect of the shank on the pelvis.1b. A flow chart describing the combined effect of the rotational alignment between the foot and the pelvis mediated by the thigh. A crude effect of the foot or thigh relates to their individual direct effect on the pelvis, while simultaneously an adjusted effect relates to their effect on the pelvis taking into account one another. p value indicates significance of effect.Crude effect of the foot on the pelvis;Crude effect of the foot on the thigh;Crude effect of the thigh on the pelvis;Adjusted effect of the foot on the pelvis;Adjusted effect of the thigh on the pelvis.

Mentions: Foot alignment had a non-significant crude and adjusted to shank effect on the pelvis (p=.15, p=.36, accordingly) (Figure 1a, Table 3). Shank alignment had a highly significant effect, both crude and adjusted to foot (p<.001) on the pelvis. However, the foot had a borderline effect on the shank (p=.09). Thus, we demonstrated in this model that the shank was not a mediator between foot and pelvis; since the crude effect of the foot on the pelvis, did not change and also remained non-significant when adjusting to the shank segment.


The Relationship Between Foot and Pelvic Alignment While Standing.

Khamis S, Dar G, Peretz C, Yizhar Z - J Hum Kinet (2015)

1a. A flow chart describing the combined effect of the rotational alignment between the foot and the pelvis mediated by the shank. A crude effect of the foot or shank relates to their individual direct effect on the pelvis, while simultaneously an adjusted effect relates to their effect on the pelvis taking into account one another. p value indicates significance of effect.Crude effect of the foot on the pelvis;Crude effect of the foot on the shank;Crude effect of the shank on the pelvis;Adjusted effect of the foot on the pelvis;Adjusted effect of the shank on the pelvis.1b. A flow chart describing the combined effect of the rotational alignment between the foot and the pelvis mediated by the thigh. A crude effect of the foot or thigh relates to their individual direct effect on the pelvis, while simultaneously an adjusted effect relates to their effect on the pelvis taking into account one another. p value indicates significance of effect.Crude effect of the foot on the pelvis;Crude effect of the foot on the thigh;Crude effect of the thigh on the pelvis;Adjusted effect of the foot on the pelvis;Adjusted effect of the thigh on the pelvis.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4519225&req=5

f1-jhk-46-85: 1a. A flow chart describing the combined effect of the rotational alignment between the foot and the pelvis mediated by the shank. A crude effect of the foot or shank relates to their individual direct effect on the pelvis, while simultaneously an adjusted effect relates to their effect on the pelvis taking into account one another. p value indicates significance of effect.Crude effect of the foot on the pelvis;Crude effect of the foot on the shank;Crude effect of the shank on the pelvis;Adjusted effect of the foot on the pelvis;Adjusted effect of the shank on the pelvis.1b. A flow chart describing the combined effect of the rotational alignment between the foot and the pelvis mediated by the thigh. A crude effect of the foot or thigh relates to their individual direct effect on the pelvis, while simultaneously an adjusted effect relates to their effect on the pelvis taking into account one another. p value indicates significance of effect.Crude effect of the foot on the pelvis;Crude effect of the foot on the thigh;Crude effect of the thigh on the pelvis;Adjusted effect of the foot on the pelvis;Adjusted effect of the thigh on the pelvis.
Mentions: Foot alignment had a non-significant crude and adjusted to shank effect on the pelvis (p=.15, p=.36, accordingly) (Figure 1a, Table 3). Shank alignment had a highly significant effect, both crude and adjusted to foot (p<.001) on the pelvis. However, the foot had a borderline effect on the shank (p=.09). Thus, we demonstrated in this model that the shank was not a mediator between foot and pelvis; since the crude effect of the foot on the pelvis, did not change and also remained non-significant when adjusting to the shank segment.

Bottom Line: A significant (p<0.05) bi-variate relationship was found between the anterior pelvic tilt and thigh internal rotation, in all four standing positions (.41≤r≤.46, in all p<0.014).A combined effect of rotational alignment between segments and the cumulative effect of foot hyperpronation on pelvic tilt revealed that only the shank significantly affected pelvic alignment, acting as a mediator between a foot and a thigh with the thigh having a crude significant effect on the pelvis.It can be concluded that in response to induced hyperpronation, the shank is a pivotal segment in postural adjustment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Gait and Motion Analysis Laboratory, Dana Children's Hospital, Tel-Aviv Medical Center, Tel-Aviv, Israel.

ABSTRACT
A normal motion and segmental interrelationship has been determined as a significant factor in normal function. Yet, the relationship between distal segments and pelvic alignment needs further investigation. The aim of this study was to investigate the interrelationship between distal and proximal lower extremity segments while standing and during induced feet hyperpronation. Changes in alignment of the pelvis and lower extremities were measured at a gait laboratory using the VICON 612 computerized motion analysis system. Thirty-five healthy volunteer subjects were recruited. Four randomized repeated-measure standing modes were used: standing directly on the floor and then on three wedges angled at 10°, 15° and 20° to induce bilateral hyperpronation for 20 seconds. A significant (p<0.05) bi-variate relationship was found between the anterior pelvic tilt and thigh internal rotation, in all four standing positions (.41≤r≤.46, in all p<0.014). A combined effect of rotational alignment between segments and the cumulative effect of foot hyperpronation on pelvic tilt revealed that only the shank significantly affected pelvic alignment, acting as a mediator between a foot and a thigh with the thigh having a crude significant effect on the pelvis. When internal rotation of the shank occurs, calcaneal eversion couples with thigh internal rotation and anterior pelvic tilt. It can be concluded that in response to induced hyperpronation, the shank is a pivotal segment in postural adjustment.

No MeSH data available.