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Breast Support Garments are Ineffective at Reducing Breast Motion During an Aqua Aerobics Jumping Exercise.

Mills C, Ayres B, Scurr J - J Hum Kinet (2015)

Bottom Line: Underwater video cameras recorded the motion of the trunk and right breast.Key results showed that the swimsuit and sports bra were able to significantly reduce the superioinferior breast range of motion by 0.04 and 0.05 m, respectively, and peak velocity by 0.23 and 0.33 m/s, respectively, during land-based jumping when compared to the bare-breasted condition, but were ineffective at reducing breast kinematics during water-based jumping.Furthermore, the magnitude of the swimsuit superioinferior breast range of motion during water-based jumping was significantly greater than land-based jumping (0.13 m and 0.06 m), yet there were no significant differences in exercise induced breast pain, thus contradicting previously published relationships between these parameters on land.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Sport and Exercise Science, Spinnaker Building, University of Portsmouth, PO1 2ER.

ABSTRACT
The buoyant forces of water during aquatic exercise may provide a form of 'natural' breast support and help to minimise breast motion and alleviate exercise induced breast pain. Six larger-breasted females performed standing vertical land and water-based jumps, whilst wearing three breast support conditions. Underwater video cameras recorded the motion of the trunk and right breast. Trunk and relative breast kinematics were calculated as well as exercised induced breast pain scores. Key results showed that the swimsuit and sports bra were able to significantly reduce the superioinferior breast range of motion by 0.04 and 0.05 m, respectively, and peak velocity by 0.23 and 0.33 m/s, respectively, during land-based jumping when compared to the bare-breasted condition, but were ineffective at reducing breast kinematics during water-based jumping. Furthermore, the magnitude of the swimsuit superioinferior breast range of motion during water-based jumping was significantly greater than land-based jumping (0.13 m and 0.06 m), yet there were no significant differences in exercise induced breast pain, thus contradicting previously published relationships between these parameters on land. Furthermore, the addition of an external breast support garment was able to reduce breast kinematics on land but not in water, suggesting the swimsuit and sports bras were ineffective and improvements in swimwear breast support garments may help to reduce excessive breast motion during aqua aerobic jumping exercises.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Examples of the position and velocity time history of the sternal notch and breast during jumping in water (n=1). Zero at the y axis equals water’s surface.
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f3-jhk-46-49: Examples of the position and velocity time history of the sternal notch and breast during jumping in water (n=1). Zero at the y axis equals water’s surface.

Mentions: An interesting observation of the time normalised vertical trunk and breast position and breast velocity could help to explain the increased superioinferior breast velocity found during the water-based jumps. As the sternal notch (origin of the trunk) moved vertically higher during the jump, initially the breast remained in the water, as the breast approached the water’s surface the relative position between the nipple marker on the breast and the sternal notch marker increased, once the breast breached the water’s surface there was a rapid change in position (and hence velocity) as the breast ‘popped’ out of the water (Figure 3).


Breast Support Garments are Ineffective at Reducing Breast Motion During an Aqua Aerobics Jumping Exercise.

Mills C, Ayres B, Scurr J - J Hum Kinet (2015)

Examples of the position and velocity time history of the sternal notch and breast during jumping in water (n=1). Zero at the y axis equals water’s surface.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4519221&req=5

f3-jhk-46-49: Examples of the position and velocity time history of the sternal notch and breast during jumping in water (n=1). Zero at the y axis equals water’s surface.
Mentions: An interesting observation of the time normalised vertical trunk and breast position and breast velocity could help to explain the increased superioinferior breast velocity found during the water-based jumps. As the sternal notch (origin of the trunk) moved vertically higher during the jump, initially the breast remained in the water, as the breast approached the water’s surface the relative position between the nipple marker on the breast and the sternal notch marker increased, once the breast breached the water’s surface there was a rapid change in position (and hence velocity) as the breast ‘popped’ out of the water (Figure 3).

Bottom Line: Underwater video cameras recorded the motion of the trunk and right breast.Key results showed that the swimsuit and sports bra were able to significantly reduce the superioinferior breast range of motion by 0.04 and 0.05 m, respectively, and peak velocity by 0.23 and 0.33 m/s, respectively, during land-based jumping when compared to the bare-breasted condition, but were ineffective at reducing breast kinematics during water-based jumping.Furthermore, the magnitude of the swimsuit superioinferior breast range of motion during water-based jumping was significantly greater than land-based jumping (0.13 m and 0.06 m), yet there were no significant differences in exercise induced breast pain, thus contradicting previously published relationships between these parameters on land.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Sport and Exercise Science, Spinnaker Building, University of Portsmouth, PO1 2ER.

ABSTRACT
The buoyant forces of water during aquatic exercise may provide a form of 'natural' breast support and help to minimise breast motion and alleviate exercise induced breast pain. Six larger-breasted females performed standing vertical land and water-based jumps, whilst wearing three breast support conditions. Underwater video cameras recorded the motion of the trunk and right breast. Trunk and relative breast kinematics were calculated as well as exercised induced breast pain scores. Key results showed that the swimsuit and sports bra were able to significantly reduce the superioinferior breast range of motion by 0.04 and 0.05 m, respectively, and peak velocity by 0.23 and 0.33 m/s, respectively, during land-based jumping when compared to the bare-breasted condition, but were ineffective at reducing breast kinematics during water-based jumping. Furthermore, the magnitude of the swimsuit superioinferior breast range of motion during water-based jumping was significantly greater than land-based jumping (0.13 m and 0.06 m), yet there were no significant differences in exercise induced breast pain, thus contradicting previously published relationships between these parameters on land. Furthermore, the addition of an external breast support garment was able to reduce breast kinematics on land but not in water, suggesting the swimsuit and sports bras were ineffective and improvements in swimwear breast support garments may help to reduce excessive breast motion during aqua aerobic jumping exercises.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus