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The Functional Classification and Field Test Performance in Wheelchair Basketball Players.

Gil SM, Yanci J, Otero M, Olasagasti J, Badiola A, Bidaurrazaga-Letona I, Iturricastillo A, Granados C - J Hum Kinet (2015)

Bottom Line: Also, the 20 m sprint with a ball (r= 0.68) and the T-test (r= -0.57) correlated (p<0.05) with the experience in playing wheelchair basketball.Therefore, in this team the correlations of the performance variables differed when they were related to the disability class, the years of dependence on the wheelchair and the experience in playing wheelchair basketball.These results should be taken into account by the technical staff and coaches of the teams when assessing performance of wheelchair basketball players.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiology. Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry. University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU).

ABSTRACT
Wheelchair basketball players are classified in four classes based on the International Wheelchair Basketball Federation (IWBF) system of competition. Thus, the aim of the study was to ascertain if the IWBF classification, the type of injury and the wheelchair experience were related to different performance field-based tests. Thirteen basketball players undertook anthropometric measurements and performance tests (hand dynamometry, 5 m and 20 m sprints, 5 m and 20 m sprints with a ball, a T-test, a Pick-up test, a modified 10 m Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test, a maximal pass and a medicine ball throw). The IWBF class was correlated (p<0.05) to the hand dynamometry (r= 0.84), the maximal pass (r=0.67) and the medicine ball throw (r= 0.67). Whereas the years of dependence on the wheelchair were correlated to the velocity (p<0.01): 5 m (r= -0.80) and 20 m (r= -0.77) and agility tests (r= -0.77, p<0.01). Also, the 20 m sprint with a ball (r= 0.68) and the T-test (r= -0.57) correlated (p<0.05) with the experience in playing wheelchair basketball. Therefore, in this team the correlations of the performance variables differed when they were related to the disability class, the years of dependence on the wheelchair and the experience in playing wheelchair basketball. These results should be taken into account by the technical staff and coaches of the teams when assessing performance of wheelchair basketball players.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Agility T-test
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f2-jhk-46-219: Agility T-test

Mentions: T-test: The participants began with the wheels 0.5 m from cone A, and completed the circuit as follows (Figure 2) using the protocol by Sassi et al. (2009), modified to perform with a wheelchair and always using forward movements (Yanci et al., 2015). A–B displacement (9.14 m): At his/her own discretion, each subject moved quickly forward to cone B and touched the top with the right hand. B–C displacement (4.57 m): Facing forward they moved to the left to cone D and touched the top with the left hand. C–D displacement (9.14 m): The participants then moved to the right to cone D and touched the top. D–B displacement (4.57 m): They moved back to the left to cone B and touched the top. B-A displacement (9.14 m): Finally, the participants moved as quickly as possible and returned to line A. All participants performed the test 3 times with at least 3 min rest between trials. The total distance covered was 36.56 m and the height of the cones was 0.3 m. Seven days later, the retest was performed under the same conditions. A photocell (Migrogate Polifemo Radio Light®, Bolzano, Italy) located over cone A was used to record the time. Time measurement started and finished when the subject crossed the line between the tripods. The calculated margin of error was ±0.001 s and the sensors were set approximately 0.40 m above the floor. The coefficient of variation was 2.58%.


The Functional Classification and Field Test Performance in Wheelchair Basketball Players.

Gil SM, Yanci J, Otero M, Olasagasti J, Badiola A, Bidaurrazaga-Letona I, Iturricastillo A, Granados C - J Hum Kinet (2015)

Agility T-test
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4519213&req=5

f2-jhk-46-219: Agility T-test
Mentions: T-test: The participants began with the wheels 0.5 m from cone A, and completed the circuit as follows (Figure 2) using the protocol by Sassi et al. (2009), modified to perform with a wheelchair and always using forward movements (Yanci et al., 2015). A–B displacement (9.14 m): At his/her own discretion, each subject moved quickly forward to cone B and touched the top with the right hand. B–C displacement (4.57 m): Facing forward they moved to the left to cone D and touched the top with the left hand. C–D displacement (9.14 m): The participants then moved to the right to cone D and touched the top. D–B displacement (4.57 m): They moved back to the left to cone B and touched the top. B-A displacement (9.14 m): Finally, the participants moved as quickly as possible and returned to line A. All participants performed the test 3 times with at least 3 min rest between trials. The total distance covered was 36.56 m and the height of the cones was 0.3 m. Seven days later, the retest was performed under the same conditions. A photocell (Migrogate Polifemo Radio Light®, Bolzano, Italy) located over cone A was used to record the time. Time measurement started and finished when the subject crossed the line between the tripods. The calculated margin of error was ±0.001 s and the sensors were set approximately 0.40 m above the floor. The coefficient of variation was 2.58%.

Bottom Line: Also, the 20 m sprint with a ball (r= 0.68) and the T-test (r= -0.57) correlated (p<0.05) with the experience in playing wheelchair basketball.Therefore, in this team the correlations of the performance variables differed when they were related to the disability class, the years of dependence on the wheelchair and the experience in playing wheelchair basketball.These results should be taken into account by the technical staff and coaches of the teams when assessing performance of wheelchair basketball players.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiology. Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry. University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU).

ABSTRACT
Wheelchair basketball players are classified in four classes based on the International Wheelchair Basketball Federation (IWBF) system of competition. Thus, the aim of the study was to ascertain if the IWBF classification, the type of injury and the wheelchair experience were related to different performance field-based tests. Thirteen basketball players undertook anthropometric measurements and performance tests (hand dynamometry, 5 m and 20 m sprints, 5 m and 20 m sprints with a ball, a T-test, a Pick-up test, a modified 10 m Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test, a maximal pass and a medicine ball throw). The IWBF class was correlated (p<0.05) to the hand dynamometry (r= 0.84), the maximal pass (r=0.67) and the medicine ball throw (r= 0.67). Whereas the years of dependence on the wheelchair were correlated to the velocity (p<0.01): 5 m (r= -0.80) and 20 m (r= -0.77) and agility tests (r= -0.77, p<0.01). Also, the 20 m sprint with a ball (r= 0.68) and the T-test (r= -0.57) correlated (p<0.05) with the experience in playing wheelchair basketball. Therefore, in this team the correlations of the performance variables differed when they were related to the disability class, the years of dependence on the wheelchair and the experience in playing wheelchair basketball. These results should be taken into account by the technical staff and coaches of the teams when assessing performance of wheelchair basketball players.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus