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Connecting Athletes' Self-Perceptions and Metaperceptions of Competence: a Structural Equation Modeling Approach.

Cecchini JA, Fernández-Rio J, Méndez-Giménez A - J Hum Kinet (2015)

Bottom Line: Competence metaperceptions were strong predictors of competence self-perceptions, confirming the atypical metaperception formation in outcome-dependent contexts such as sport.Therefore, athletes build their competence metaperceptions using all information available from their coaches.Finally, only task-self perfections positively predicted athletes' competence self-perceptions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Oviedo; Faculty of Teacher Training and Education; Department of Educational Sciences, Spain.

ABSTRACT
This study explored the relationships between athletes' competence self-perceptions and metaperceptions. Two hundred and fifty one student-athletes (14.26 ± 1.89 years), members of twenty different teams (basketball, soccer) completed a questionnaire which included the Perception of Success Questionnaire, the Competence subscale of the Intrinsic Motivation Inventory, and modified versions of both questionnaires to assess athletes' metaperceptions. Structural equation modelling analysis revealed that athletes' task and ego metaperceptions positively predicted task and ego self-perceptions, respectively. Competence metaperceptions were strong predictors of competence self-perceptions, confirming the atypical metaperception formation in outcome-dependent contexts such as sport. Task and ego metaperceptions positively predicted athletes' competence metaperceptions. How coaches value their athletes' competence is more influential on what the athletes think of themselves than their own self-perceptions. Athletes' ego and task metaperceptions influenced their competence metaperceptions (how coaches rate their competence). Therefore, athletes build their competence metaperceptions using all information available from their coaches. Finally, only task-self perfections positively predicted athletes' competence self-perceptions.

No MeSH data available.


Hypothesized model containing the parameters of the Path analysis.x1 = Task Metaperception; x2 = Ego Metaperception; z1 = Task Self-perception; z2 = Ego Self-perception; y1 = Competence Metaperception; y2 = Competence Self-perception.
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f1-jhk-46-189: Hypothesized model containing the parameters of the Path analysis.x1 = Task Metaperception; x2 = Ego Metaperception; z1 = Task Self-perception; z2 = Ego Self-perception; y1 = Competence Metaperception; y2 = Competence Self-perception.

Mentions: Previous research has explored the atypical metaperceptive formation in outcome-dependent educational contexts (Kaplan et al., 2009). However, no studies have addressed this issue in sport settings, where coaches are in a powerful position. Moreover, there has been a call to study the coach-athlete relationship to understand motivation in sport (Adie and Jowett, 2010). Based on the aforementioned, the primary goal of this study was to explore, through a path analysis, the relationships between athletes’ competence self-perception and metaperception. The first hypothesis was that task metaperceptions will positively influence task self-perceptions (Cz1x1 +), while ego metaperceptions will positively influence ego self-perceptions (Cz2x2 +). The second hypothesis was that athletes’ competence metaperceptions will be linked to task (Cy1x1 +) and ego metaperceptions (Cy1x2 +). Finally, the third hypothesis was that athletes’ competence self-perceptions will be dependent upon task self-perceptions (Cy2z1 +) but, more important, upon competence metaperceptions (Cy2y1 +). We believed that how others view us is more influential on how we see ourselves than our self-perceptions (Figure 1).


Connecting Athletes' Self-Perceptions and Metaperceptions of Competence: a Structural Equation Modeling Approach.

Cecchini JA, Fernández-Rio J, Méndez-Giménez A - J Hum Kinet (2015)

Hypothesized model containing the parameters of the Path analysis.x1 = Task Metaperception; x2 = Ego Metaperception; z1 = Task Self-perception; z2 = Ego Self-perception; y1 = Competence Metaperception; y2 = Competence Self-perception.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4519209&req=5

f1-jhk-46-189: Hypothesized model containing the parameters of the Path analysis.x1 = Task Metaperception; x2 = Ego Metaperception; z1 = Task Self-perception; z2 = Ego Self-perception; y1 = Competence Metaperception; y2 = Competence Self-perception.
Mentions: Previous research has explored the atypical metaperceptive formation in outcome-dependent educational contexts (Kaplan et al., 2009). However, no studies have addressed this issue in sport settings, where coaches are in a powerful position. Moreover, there has been a call to study the coach-athlete relationship to understand motivation in sport (Adie and Jowett, 2010). Based on the aforementioned, the primary goal of this study was to explore, through a path analysis, the relationships between athletes’ competence self-perception and metaperception. The first hypothesis was that task metaperceptions will positively influence task self-perceptions (Cz1x1 +), while ego metaperceptions will positively influence ego self-perceptions (Cz2x2 +). The second hypothesis was that athletes’ competence metaperceptions will be linked to task (Cy1x1 +) and ego metaperceptions (Cy1x2 +). Finally, the third hypothesis was that athletes’ competence self-perceptions will be dependent upon task self-perceptions (Cy2z1 +) but, more important, upon competence metaperceptions (Cy2y1 +). We believed that how others view us is more influential on how we see ourselves than our self-perceptions (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Competence metaperceptions were strong predictors of competence self-perceptions, confirming the atypical metaperception formation in outcome-dependent contexts such as sport.Therefore, athletes build their competence metaperceptions using all information available from their coaches.Finally, only task-self perfections positively predicted athletes' competence self-perceptions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Oviedo; Faculty of Teacher Training and Education; Department of Educational Sciences, Spain.

ABSTRACT
This study explored the relationships between athletes' competence self-perceptions and metaperceptions. Two hundred and fifty one student-athletes (14.26 ± 1.89 years), members of twenty different teams (basketball, soccer) completed a questionnaire which included the Perception of Success Questionnaire, the Competence subscale of the Intrinsic Motivation Inventory, and modified versions of both questionnaires to assess athletes' metaperceptions. Structural equation modelling analysis revealed that athletes' task and ego metaperceptions positively predicted task and ego self-perceptions, respectively. Competence metaperceptions were strong predictors of competence self-perceptions, confirming the atypical metaperception formation in outcome-dependent contexts such as sport. Task and ego metaperceptions positively predicted athletes' competence metaperceptions. How coaches value their athletes' competence is more influential on what the athletes think of themselves than their own self-perceptions. Athletes' ego and task metaperceptions influenced their competence metaperceptions (how coaches rate their competence). Therefore, athletes build their competence metaperceptions using all information available from their coaches. Finally, only task-self perfections positively predicted athletes' competence self-perceptions.

No MeSH data available.