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Effects of a Low-Load Gluteal Warm-Up on Explosive Jump Performance.

Comyns T, Kenny I, Scales G - J Hum Kinet (2015)

Bottom Line: Research by Crow et al. (2012) found that a low-load gluteal warm-up could be effective in enhancing peak power output during a countermovement jump.Repeated measures analysis of variance found a number of significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) between baseline and post warm-up scores.Height jumped decreased significantly in both jumps at all rest intervals excluding 8 minutes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biomechanics Research Unit, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland. ; Irish Institute of Sport, Abbotstown, Dublin 15, Ireland.

ABSTRACT
The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a low-load gluteal warm-up protocol on countermovement and squat jump performance. Research by Crow et al. (2012) found that a low-load gluteal warm-up could be effective in enhancing peak power output during a countermovement jump. Eleven subjects performed countermovement and squat jumps before and after the gluteal warm-up protocol. Both jumps were examined in separate testing sessions and performed 30 seconds, and 2, 4, 6 & 8 minutes post warm-up. Height jumped and peak ground reaction force were the dependent variables examined in both jumps, with 6 additional variables related to fast force production being examined in the squat jump only. All jumps were performed on a force platform (AMTI OR6-5). Repeated measures analysis of variance found a number of significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) between baseline and post warm-up scores. Height jumped decreased significantly in both jumps at all rest intervals excluding 8 minutes. Improvement was seen in 7 of the 8 recorded SJ variables at the 8 minute interval. Five of these improvements were deemed statistically significant, namely time to peak GRF (43.0%), and time to the maximum rate of force development (65.7%) significantly decreased, while starting strength (63.4%), change of force in first 100 ms of contraction (49.1%) and speed strength (43.6%) significantly increased. The results indicate that a gluteal warm-up can enhance force production in squat jumps performed after 8 minutes recovery. Future research in this area should include additional warm-up intervention groups for comparative reasons.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean ± 95% CI Peak Ground Reaction Force difference between the baseline CMJs and SJs and the CMJs and SJs at each different rest interval.*p<0.05.
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f3-jhk-46-177: Mean ± 95% CI Peak Ground Reaction Force difference between the baseline CMJs and SJs and the CMJs and SJs at each different rest interval.*p<0.05.

Mentions: The results for FT and peak GRF are presented in Figures 2 and 3. The mean baseline scores for FT and GRF were subtracted from their corresponding post intervention scores at each rest interval. Thus in Figures 2 and 3 the x-axis represents the baseline scores. Figure 2 illustrates the results for height jumped for the CMJ and SJ. The GLM ANOVA CMJ results showed a significant reduction in performance after 30 s (p<0.0001; d=0.305, small), 2 min (p=0.006; d=0.177, trivial), 4 min (p=0.05; d=0.218, small) and 6 min (p=0.049; d=0.227, small) rest. Similar to the CMJ, the analysis of height jumped for the SJ showed a significant decrease in performance after 30 s (p=0.023; d=0.367, small), 2 min (p=0.001; d=0.326, small), 4 min (p=0.002; d=0.436, small) and 6 min (p=0.001; d=0.379, small) rest, as shown in Figure 2.


Effects of a Low-Load Gluteal Warm-Up on Explosive Jump Performance.

Comyns T, Kenny I, Scales G - J Hum Kinet (2015)

Mean ± 95% CI Peak Ground Reaction Force difference between the baseline CMJs and SJs and the CMJs and SJs at each different rest interval.*p<0.05.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4519208&req=5

f3-jhk-46-177: Mean ± 95% CI Peak Ground Reaction Force difference between the baseline CMJs and SJs and the CMJs and SJs at each different rest interval.*p<0.05.
Mentions: The results for FT and peak GRF are presented in Figures 2 and 3. The mean baseline scores for FT and GRF were subtracted from their corresponding post intervention scores at each rest interval. Thus in Figures 2 and 3 the x-axis represents the baseline scores. Figure 2 illustrates the results for height jumped for the CMJ and SJ. The GLM ANOVA CMJ results showed a significant reduction in performance after 30 s (p<0.0001; d=0.305, small), 2 min (p=0.006; d=0.177, trivial), 4 min (p=0.05; d=0.218, small) and 6 min (p=0.049; d=0.227, small) rest. Similar to the CMJ, the analysis of height jumped for the SJ showed a significant decrease in performance after 30 s (p=0.023; d=0.367, small), 2 min (p=0.001; d=0.326, small), 4 min (p=0.002; d=0.436, small) and 6 min (p=0.001; d=0.379, small) rest, as shown in Figure 2.

Bottom Line: Research by Crow et al. (2012) found that a low-load gluteal warm-up could be effective in enhancing peak power output during a countermovement jump.Repeated measures analysis of variance found a number of significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) between baseline and post warm-up scores.Height jumped decreased significantly in both jumps at all rest intervals excluding 8 minutes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biomechanics Research Unit, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland. ; Irish Institute of Sport, Abbotstown, Dublin 15, Ireland.

ABSTRACT
The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a low-load gluteal warm-up protocol on countermovement and squat jump performance. Research by Crow et al. (2012) found that a low-load gluteal warm-up could be effective in enhancing peak power output during a countermovement jump. Eleven subjects performed countermovement and squat jumps before and after the gluteal warm-up protocol. Both jumps were examined in separate testing sessions and performed 30 seconds, and 2, 4, 6 & 8 minutes post warm-up. Height jumped and peak ground reaction force were the dependent variables examined in both jumps, with 6 additional variables related to fast force production being examined in the squat jump only. All jumps were performed on a force platform (AMTI OR6-5). Repeated measures analysis of variance found a number of significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) between baseline and post warm-up scores. Height jumped decreased significantly in both jumps at all rest intervals excluding 8 minutes. Improvement was seen in 7 of the 8 recorded SJ variables at the 8 minute interval. Five of these improvements were deemed statistically significant, namely time to peak GRF (43.0%), and time to the maximum rate of force development (65.7%) significantly decreased, while starting strength (63.4%), change of force in first 100 ms of contraction (49.1%) and speed strength (43.6%) significantly increased. The results indicate that a gluteal warm-up can enhance force production in squat jumps performed after 8 minutes recovery. Future research in this area should include additional warm-up intervention groups for comparative reasons.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus