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Effects of a Low-Load Gluteal Warm-Up on Explosive Jump Performance.

Comyns T, Kenny I, Scales G - J Hum Kinet (2015)

Bottom Line: Research by Crow et al. (2012) found that a low-load gluteal warm-up could be effective in enhancing peak power output during a countermovement jump.Repeated measures analysis of variance found a number of significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) between baseline and post warm-up scores.Height jumped decreased significantly in both jumps at all rest intervals excluding 8 minutes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biomechanics Research Unit, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland. ; Irish Institute of Sport, Abbotstown, Dublin 15, Ireland.

ABSTRACT
The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a low-load gluteal warm-up protocol on countermovement and squat jump performance. Research by Crow et al. (2012) found that a low-load gluteal warm-up could be effective in enhancing peak power output during a countermovement jump. Eleven subjects performed countermovement and squat jumps before and after the gluteal warm-up protocol. Both jumps were examined in separate testing sessions and performed 30 seconds, and 2, 4, 6 & 8 minutes post warm-up. Height jumped and peak ground reaction force were the dependent variables examined in both jumps, with 6 additional variables related to fast force production being examined in the squat jump only. All jumps were performed on a force platform (AMTI OR6-5). Repeated measures analysis of variance found a number of significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) between baseline and post warm-up scores. Height jumped decreased significantly in both jumps at all rest intervals excluding 8 minutes. Improvement was seen in 7 of the 8 recorded SJ variables at the 8 minute interval. Five of these improvements were deemed statistically significant, namely time to peak GRF (43.0%), and time to the maximum rate of force development (65.7%) significantly decreased, while starting strength (63.4%), change of force in first 100 ms of contraction (49.1%) and speed strength (43.6%) significantly increased. The results indicate that a gluteal warm-up can enhance force production in squat jumps performed after 8 minutes recovery. Future research in this area should include additional warm-up intervention groups for comparative reasons.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Timeline of Testing Sessions 2 and 3.
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f1-jhk-46-177: Timeline of Testing Sessions 2 and 3.

Mentions: In the second testing session the subjects completed the general warm-up followed by recording of three baseline CMJs. The baseline jumps were separated with ninety seconds rest. The subjects then performed the gluteal warm-up followed by a further five CMJs, one at each of the pre-determined rest intervals (30 s, 2 min, 4 min, 6 min and 8 min). Subjects then completed a cool-down consisting of light jogging and static stretching of each of the major lower body muscle groups. Testing session three followed the same procedure as session two except the CMJs were replaced by SJs. A timeline of testing sessions 2 and 3 is illustrated in Figure 1.


Effects of a Low-Load Gluteal Warm-Up on Explosive Jump Performance.

Comyns T, Kenny I, Scales G - J Hum Kinet (2015)

Timeline of Testing Sessions 2 and 3.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4519208&req=5

f1-jhk-46-177: Timeline of Testing Sessions 2 and 3.
Mentions: In the second testing session the subjects completed the general warm-up followed by recording of three baseline CMJs. The baseline jumps were separated with ninety seconds rest. The subjects then performed the gluteal warm-up followed by a further five CMJs, one at each of the pre-determined rest intervals (30 s, 2 min, 4 min, 6 min and 8 min). Subjects then completed a cool-down consisting of light jogging and static stretching of each of the major lower body muscle groups. Testing session three followed the same procedure as session two except the CMJs were replaced by SJs. A timeline of testing sessions 2 and 3 is illustrated in Figure 1.

Bottom Line: Research by Crow et al. (2012) found that a low-load gluteal warm-up could be effective in enhancing peak power output during a countermovement jump.Repeated measures analysis of variance found a number of significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) between baseline and post warm-up scores.Height jumped decreased significantly in both jumps at all rest intervals excluding 8 minutes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biomechanics Research Unit, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland. ; Irish Institute of Sport, Abbotstown, Dublin 15, Ireland.

ABSTRACT
The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a low-load gluteal warm-up protocol on countermovement and squat jump performance. Research by Crow et al. (2012) found that a low-load gluteal warm-up could be effective in enhancing peak power output during a countermovement jump. Eleven subjects performed countermovement and squat jumps before and after the gluteal warm-up protocol. Both jumps were examined in separate testing sessions and performed 30 seconds, and 2, 4, 6 & 8 minutes post warm-up. Height jumped and peak ground reaction force were the dependent variables examined in both jumps, with 6 additional variables related to fast force production being examined in the squat jump only. All jumps were performed on a force platform (AMTI OR6-5). Repeated measures analysis of variance found a number of significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) between baseline and post warm-up scores. Height jumped decreased significantly in both jumps at all rest intervals excluding 8 minutes. Improvement was seen in 7 of the 8 recorded SJ variables at the 8 minute interval. Five of these improvements were deemed statistically significant, namely time to peak GRF (43.0%), and time to the maximum rate of force development (65.7%) significantly decreased, while starting strength (63.4%), change of force in first 100 ms of contraction (49.1%) and speed strength (43.6%) significantly increased. The results indicate that a gluteal warm-up can enhance force production in squat jumps performed after 8 minutes recovery. Future research in this area should include additional warm-up intervention groups for comparative reasons.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus