Limits...
The Effect of the Number of Sets on Power Output for Different Loads.

Morales-Artacho AJ, Padial P, García-Ramos A, Feriche B - J Hum Kinet (2015)

Bottom Line: Pmean increased from the first to the third set (from 5.99 ± 0.81 to 6.16 ± 0.96 W·kg(-1), p = 0.017), resulting in a main effect of the set number (p < 0.05).No significant effect was observed at 40 and 50 kg loads (p > 0.05).These results show a positive effect of the number of sets per load on Pmean, affecting Pmax, OL and potentially power training prescription.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Deparment of Physical Education and Sport. Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Granada.

ABSTRACT
There is much debate concerning the optimal load (OL) for power training. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of the number of sets performed for a given load on mean power output (Pmean). Fourteen physically active men performed 3 sets of 3 bench-press repetitions with 30, 40 and 50 kg. The highest mean power value (Pmax) across all loads and Pmean were compared when data were taken from the first set at each absolute load vs. from the best of three sets performed. Pmean increased from the first to the third set (from 5.99 ± 0.81 to 6.16 ± 0.96 W·kg(-1), p = 0.017), resulting in a main effect of the set number (p < 0.05). At the 30 kg load Pmean increased from the first to the third set (from 6.01 ± 0.75 to 6.35 ± 0.85 W·kg(-1); p < 0.01). No significant effect was observed at 40 and 50 kg loads (p > 0.05). Pmax and velocity were significantly affected by the method employed to determine Pmean at each load (p < 0.05). These results show a positive effect of the number of sets per load on Pmean, affecting Pmax, OL and potentially power training prescription.

No MeSH data available.


The procedure carried out to assess the force-velocity profile and power output
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4519205&req=5

f1-jhk-46-149: The procedure carried out to assess the force-velocity profile and power output

Mentions: In a single visit to the laboratory and following a standard warm-up, participants underwent a force-velocity profile assessment. It comprised 3 sets of 2–3 concentric-only bench-press repetitions with three increasing absolute loads (Figure 1). To avoid forward and backwards barbell displacements, testing was performed in a Smith machine (Technogym, Italy).


The Effect of the Number of Sets on Power Output for Different Loads.

Morales-Artacho AJ, Padial P, García-Ramos A, Feriche B - J Hum Kinet (2015)

The procedure carried out to assess the force-velocity profile and power output
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4519205&req=5

f1-jhk-46-149: The procedure carried out to assess the force-velocity profile and power output
Mentions: In a single visit to the laboratory and following a standard warm-up, participants underwent a force-velocity profile assessment. It comprised 3 sets of 2–3 concentric-only bench-press repetitions with three increasing absolute loads (Figure 1). To avoid forward and backwards barbell displacements, testing was performed in a Smith machine (Technogym, Italy).

Bottom Line: Pmean increased from the first to the third set (from 5.99 ± 0.81 to 6.16 ± 0.96 W·kg(-1), p = 0.017), resulting in a main effect of the set number (p < 0.05).No significant effect was observed at 40 and 50 kg loads (p > 0.05).These results show a positive effect of the number of sets per load on Pmean, affecting Pmax, OL and potentially power training prescription.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Deparment of Physical Education and Sport. Faculty of Sport Sciences, University of Granada.

ABSTRACT
There is much debate concerning the optimal load (OL) for power training. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of the number of sets performed for a given load on mean power output (Pmean). Fourteen physically active men performed 3 sets of 3 bench-press repetitions with 30, 40 and 50 kg. The highest mean power value (Pmax) across all loads and Pmean were compared when data were taken from the first set at each absolute load vs. from the best of three sets performed. Pmean increased from the first to the third set (from 5.99 ± 0.81 to 6.16 ± 0.96 W·kg(-1), p = 0.017), resulting in a main effect of the set number (p < 0.05). At the 30 kg load Pmean increased from the first to the third set (from 6.01 ± 0.75 to 6.35 ± 0.85 W·kg(-1); p < 0.01). No significant effect was observed at 40 and 50 kg loads (p > 0.05). Pmax and velocity were significantly affected by the method employed to determine Pmean at each load (p < 0.05). These results show a positive effect of the number of sets per load on Pmean, affecting Pmax, OL and potentially power training prescription.

No MeSH data available.