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Microbial Population Differentials between Mucosal and Submucosal Intestinal Tissues in Advanced Crohn's Disease of the Ileum.

Chiodini RJ, Dowd SE, Chamberlin WM, Galandiuk S, Davis B, Glassing A - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: A variety of organisms of the Phylum Firmicutes were increased in the subjacent submucosa as compared to the parallel mucosal tissue including Ruminococcus spp., Oscillospira spp., Pseudobutyrivibrio spp., and Tumebacillus spp.In addition, Propionibacterium spp. and Cloacibacterium spp. were increased as well as large increases in Proteobacteria including Parasutterella spp. and Methylobacterium spp.Our data demonstrate the existence of a distinct submucosal microbiome and ecosystem that is not well reflected in the mucosa and/or downstream fecal material.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: St. Vincent Healthcare, Sisters of Charity of Leavenworth Health System, Billings, Montana, United States of America; Department of Biological and Physical Sciences, Montana State University-Billings, Billings, Montana, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Since Crohn's disease is a transmural disease, we hypothesized that examination of deep submucosal tissues directly involved in the inflammatory disease process may provide unique insights into bacterial populations transgressing intestinal barriers and bacterial populations more representative of the causes and agents of the disease. We performed deep 16s microbiota sequencing on isolated ilea mucosal and submucosal tissues on 20 patients with Crohn's disease and 15 non-inflammatory bowel disease controls with a depth of coverage averaging 81,500 sequences in each of the 70 DNA samples yielding an overall resolution down to 0.0001% of the bacterial population. Of the 4,802,328 total sequences generated, 98.9% or 4,749,183 sequences aligned with the Kingdom Bacteria that clustered into 8545 unique sequences with <3% divergence or operational taxonomic units enabling the identification of 401 genera and 698 tentative bacterial species. There were significant differences in all taxonomic levels between the submucosal microbiota in Crohn's disease compared to controls, including organisms of the Order Desulfovibrionales that were present within the submucosal tissues of most Crohn's disease patients but absent in the control group. A variety of organisms of the Phylum Firmicutes were increased in the subjacent submucosa as compared to the parallel mucosal tissue including Ruminococcus spp., Oscillospira spp., Pseudobutyrivibrio spp., and Tumebacillus spp. In addition, Propionibacterium spp. and Cloacibacterium spp. were increased as well as large increases in Proteobacteria including Parasutterella spp. and Methylobacterium spp. This is the first study to examine the microbial populations within submucosal tissues of patients with Crohn's disease and to compare microbial communities found deep within the submucosal tissues with those present on mucosal surfaces. Our data demonstrate the existence of a distinct submucosal microbiome and ecosystem that is not well reflected in the mucosa and/or downstream fecal material.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparison of the relative abundance of bacterial Families (A) and Genera (B) within the submucosa of the diseased ileum in Crohn's disease as compared to the ileal submucosa in nIBD controls.There were major changes in 12 families and 20 genera. Legend: Bacteria present in less than 50% of patients are excluded. All data presented are statistically significant (p = <0.05).
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pone.0134382.g008: Comparison of the relative abundance of bacterial Families (A) and Genera (B) within the submucosa of the diseased ileum in Crohn's disease as compared to the ileal submucosa in nIBD controls.There were major changes in 12 families and 20 genera. Legend: Bacteria present in less than 50% of patients are excluded. All data presented are statistically significant (p = <0.05).

Mentions: As found within higher taxonomic levels, there were statistically significant differences in bacterial populations and their prevalence at the Family and Genus levels with increased prevalence within the submucosa of Crohn's disease as compared to nIBD controls in 12 Families and 34 Genera (Fig 8). Organisms of the Genera Gordonibacter spp. (Phylum Actinobacteria) and Trabulsiella spp. (Phylum Proteobacteria) were detected within the submucosa in 12 of 20 (60%; p = 0.02) and 8 of 20 (40%; p = 0.02) patients with Crohn's disease, respectively, but not in the submucosa of a single nIBD control.


Microbial Population Differentials between Mucosal and Submucosal Intestinal Tissues in Advanced Crohn's Disease of the Ileum.

Chiodini RJ, Dowd SE, Chamberlin WM, Galandiuk S, Davis B, Glassing A - PLoS ONE (2015)

Comparison of the relative abundance of bacterial Families (A) and Genera (B) within the submucosa of the diseased ileum in Crohn's disease as compared to the ileal submucosa in nIBD controls.There were major changes in 12 families and 20 genera. Legend: Bacteria present in less than 50% of patients are excluded. All data presented are statistically significant (p = <0.05).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4519195&req=5

pone.0134382.g008: Comparison of the relative abundance of bacterial Families (A) and Genera (B) within the submucosa of the diseased ileum in Crohn's disease as compared to the ileal submucosa in nIBD controls.There were major changes in 12 families and 20 genera. Legend: Bacteria present in less than 50% of patients are excluded. All data presented are statistically significant (p = <0.05).
Mentions: As found within higher taxonomic levels, there were statistically significant differences in bacterial populations and their prevalence at the Family and Genus levels with increased prevalence within the submucosa of Crohn's disease as compared to nIBD controls in 12 Families and 34 Genera (Fig 8). Organisms of the Genera Gordonibacter spp. (Phylum Actinobacteria) and Trabulsiella spp. (Phylum Proteobacteria) were detected within the submucosa in 12 of 20 (60%; p = 0.02) and 8 of 20 (40%; p = 0.02) patients with Crohn's disease, respectively, but not in the submucosa of a single nIBD control.

Bottom Line: A variety of organisms of the Phylum Firmicutes were increased in the subjacent submucosa as compared to the parallel mucosal tissue including Ruminococcus spp., Oscillospira spp., Pseudobutyrivibrio spp., and Tumebacillus spp.In addition, Propionibacterium spp. and Cloacibacterium spp. were increased as well as large increases in Proteobacteria including Parasutterella spp. and Methylobacterium spp.Our data demonstrate the existence of a distinct submucosal microbiome and ecosystem that is not well reflected in the mucosa and/or downstream fecal material.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: St. Vincent Healthcare, Sisters of Charity of Leavenworth Health System, Billings, Montana, United States of America; Department of Biological and Physical Sciences, Montana State University-Billings, Billings, Montana, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Since Crohn's disease is a transmural disease, we hypothesized that examination of deep submucosal tissues directly involved in the inflammatory disease process may provide unique insights into bacterial populations transgressing intestinal barriers and bacterial populations more representative of the causes and agents of the disease. We performed deep 16s microbiota sequencing on isolated ilea mucosal and submucosal tissues on 20 patients with Crohn's disease and 15 non-inflammatory bowel disease controls with a depth of coverage averaging 81,500 sequences in each of the 70 DNA samples yielding an overall resolution down to 0.0001% of the bacterial population. Of the 4,802,328 total sequences generated, 98.9% or 4,749,183 sequences aligned with the Kingdom Bacteria that clustered into 8545 unique sequences with <3% divergence or operational taxonomic units enabling the identification of 401 genera and 698 tentative bacterial species. There were significant differences in all taxonomic levels between the submucosal microbiota in Crohn's disease compared to controls, including organisms of the Order Desulfovibrionales that were present within the submucosal tissues of most Crohn's disease patients but absent in the control group. A variety of organisms of the Phylum Firmicutes were increased in the subjacent submucosa as compared to the parallel mucosal tissue including Ruminococcus spp., Oscillospira spp., Pseudobutyrivibrio spp., and Tumebacillus spp. In addition, Propionibacterium spp. and Cloacibacterium spp. were increased as well as large increases in Proteobacteria including Parasutterella spp. and Methylobacterium spp. This is the first study to examine the microbial populations within submucosal tissues of patients with Crohn's disease and to compare microbial communities found deep within the submucosal tissues with those present on mucosal surfaces. Our data demonstrate the existence of a distinct submucosal microbiome and ecosystem that is not well reflected in the mucosa and/or downstream fecal material.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus