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World Input-Output Network.

Cerina F, Zhu Z, Chessa A, Riccaboni M - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: At regional level, we find that the world production is still operated nationally or at most regionally as the communities detected are either individual economies or geographically well defined regions.Finally, at local level, for each industry we compare the network-based measures with the traditional methods of backward linkages.We find that the network-based measures such as PageRank centrality and community coreness measure can give valuable insights into identifying the key industries.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Linkalab, Complex Systems Computational Laboratory, Cagliari, Italy; Department of Physics, Università degli Studi di Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Production systems, traditionally analyzed as almost independent national systems, are increasingly connected on a global scale. Only recently becoming available, the World Input-Output Database (WIOD) is one of the first efforts to construct the global multi-regional input-output (GMRIO) tables. By viewing the world input-output system as an interdependent network where the nodes are the individual industries in different economies and the edges are the monetary goods flows between industries, we analyze respectively the global, regional, and local network properties of the so-called world input-output network (WION) and document its evolution over time. At global level, we find that the industries are highly but asymmetrically connected, which implies that micro shocks can lead to macro fluctuations. At regional level, we find that the world production is still operated nationally or at most regionally as the communities detected are either individual economies or geographically well defined regions. Finally, at local level, for each industry we compare the network-based measures with the traditional methods of backward linkages. We find that the network-based measures such as PageRank centrality and community coreness measure can give valuable insights into identifying the key industries.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Histogram of in-degree, out-degree, and total-degree distributions for selected years.For the selected years 1995, 2003, and 2011, the first row has the in-degree distributions while the second row and the third row have the out-degree and total-degree distributions respectively. The WION is characterized by the highly left-skewed degree distributions. Most nodes enjoy high-degree connections in the WION due to the aggregated industry classification.
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pone.0134025.g006: Histogram of in-degree, out-degree, and total-degree distributions for selected years.For the selected years 1995, 2003, and 2011, the first row has the in-degree distributions while the second row and the third row have the out-degree and total-degree distributions respectively. The WION is characterized by the highly left-skewed degree distributions. Most nodes enjoy high-degree connections in the WION due to the aggregated industry classification.

Mentions: As shown in Fig 6, unlike other network systems such as the internet, where the degree distributions follow the power law, the WION is characterized by the highly left-skewed degree distributions. Most nodes enjoy high-degree connections in the WION because the industries are highly aggregated. Furthermore, the WION is almost complete, i.e., every node is connected with almost every node, if represented by unweighted edges. The same feature is also found in the input-output networks at the national level [12]. Using a single-year (2006) GMRIO table, Carvalho [14] also reports the heavy-tailed but non-power-law degree distributions.


World Input-Output Network.

Cerina F, Zhu Z, Chessa A, Riccaboni M - PLoS ONE (2015)

Histogram of in-degree, out-degree, and total-degree distributions for selected years.For the selected years 1995, 2003, and 2011, the first row has the in-degree distributions while the second row and the third row have the out-degree and total-degree distributions respectively. The WION is characterized by the highly left-skewed degree distributions. Most nodes enjoy high-degree connections in the WION due to the aggregated industry classification.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4519177&req=5

pone.0134025.g006: Histogram of in-degree, out-degree, and total-degree distributions for selected years.For the selected years 1995, 2003, and 2011, the first row has the in-degree distributions while the second row and the third row have the out-degree and total-degree distributions respectively. The WION is characterized by the highly left-skewed degree distributions. Most nodes enjoy high-degree connections in the WION due to the aggregated industry classification.
Mentions: As shown in Fig 6, unlike other network systems such as the internet, where the degree distributions follow the power law, the WION is characterized by the highly left-skewed degree distributions. Most nodes enjoy high-degree connections in the WION because the industries are highly aggregated. Furthermore, the WION is almost complete, i.e., every node is connected with almost every node, if represented by unweighted edges. The same feature is also found in the input-output networks at the national level [12]. Using a single-year (2006) GMRIO table, Carvalho [14] also reports the heavy-tailed but non-power-law degree distributions.

Bottom Line: At regional level, we find that the world production is still operated nationally or at most regionally as the communities detected are either individual economies or geographically well defined regions.Finally, at local level, for each industry we compare the network-based measures with the traditional methods of backward linkages.We find that the network-based measures such as PageRank centrality and community coreness measure can give valuable insights into identifying the key industries.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Linkalab, Complex Systems Computational Laboratory, Cagliari, Italy; Department of Physics, Università degli Studi di Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Production systems, traditionally analyzed as almost independent national systems, are increasingly connected on a global scale. Only recently becoming available, the World Input-Output Database (WIOD) is one of the first efforts to construct the global multi-regional input-output (GMRIO) tables. By viewing the world input-output system as an interdependent network where the nodes are the individual industries in different economies and the edges are the monetary goods flows between industries, we analyze respectively the global, regional, and local network properties of the so-called world input-output network (WION) and document its evolution over time. At global level, we find that the industries are highly but asymmetrically connected, which implies that micro shocks can lead to macro fluctuations. At regional level, we find that the world production is still operated nationally or at most regionally as the communities detected are either individual economies or geographically well defined regions. Finally, at local level, for each industry we compare the network-based measures with the traditional methods of backward linkages. We find that the network-based measures such as PageRank centrality and community coreness measure can give valuable insights into identifying the key industries.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus